Finance Minister, Ken Ofori-Atta: 2022 Budget Statement and Economic Policy

2022 Budget Statement & Economic Policy

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The Finance Minister of Ghana, Ken Ofori-Atta has today, Wednesday, November 17th, 2021, presented the 2022 Budget Statement and Economic Policy of government in Parliament.

This is in accordance with Article 179 of the 1992 constitution and section 21 of the Public Financial Management Act, 2016 (Act 921).

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Mr Ken Ofori-Atta announced, during his presentation, that the government of Ghana has proposed the abolishment of all road tolls in the country.

Yours Truly, BieGyaNation.Com presents the full text of the 2022 Budget.

2022 Budget Statement and Economic Policy by Ken Ofori-Atta

INTRODUCTION

  1. Right Honourable Speaker, Honourable Members of Parliament, on the authority of His Excellency, The President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo, I beg to move that this august House approves the Financial Policy of the Government of Ghana for the year ending 31st December,
  2. On the authority of H.E. The President, and in accordance with Articles 179 and 180 of the 1992 Constitution, I present to this House, the Budget of The President of the Republic of Ghana for the 2022 Financial Year.
  3. I also submit to this House the following statutory reports:
    • The 2021 Annual Report on the Petroleum Funds, in accordance with Section

48 of the Petroleum Revenue Management Act, 2011 (Act 815), (as amended); and

  • The 2021 Report on the Utilisation of the African Union Levies in accordance with Section 7 of the African Union Import Levies Act, 2017 (Act 952).

 

  1. Speaker, almost two years ago, Ghana confirmed its first case of COVID-19. Since then, efforts to contain the virus and its impact on our lives have dominated the actions of Governments – not only here in Ghana, but across the globe. The COVID-19 pandemic, which swept through the world, has upended and exposed the weaknesses in some of the critical structures and systems in education, health, economic life, communities and everyday family life.

 

  1. The pandemic triggered a sharp and heavy disruption in global supply chains as lockdowns and restrictions led to reductions in demand and production levels. The pick-up in demand for goods this year has also created a new inflationary challenge with the continuous rise in the cost of shipping. The price for ocean freight has shot up with the average price for a container some 250 percent higher than a year

 

  1. Speaker, the spiraling costs of shipping have hit businesses hard, particularly small and medium scale enterprises. SMEs have had to struggle with the economic fallout from the pandemic and furthermore they are now being forced to cope with the rising cost of shipping. This is making the lives of traders and consumers very difficult.

 

  1. The hardship Ghanaians have experienced due to COVID-19 is not lost on the We have been there with the people, playing the difficult but necessary balancing act of managing an economy put under extreme distress by the pandemic and, at the same time, supporting households and businesses to cope.

 

  1. We empathise with:
    • families who lost loved ones during the pandemic;
    • private school teachers who lost income for 12 months;
    • business owners who lost earnings;
    • the thousands of hospitality and tourism sector workers who were laid off;
    • the slump in businesses built around our traditional and other social events;
    • the jobless young people whose strenuous efforts to find work have been further compromised by the pandemic; and
    • the impact on our mental health and wellbeing which has also been

 

  1. Speaker, we had to address both the immediate as well as persisting health and economic impacts of the pandemic. Our response was bold, decisive and compassionate, but also costly. As a responsible Government, we have had no choice but to implement critical interventions to save lives and jobs, including feeding nearly 2.8 million people with hot meals and a further 470,000 families with dry food packages.

 

  1. To mitigate the health impact of the pandemic, Government also employed additional 38,000 nurses. Tax exemptions worth GH¢36.8 million were also granted to our frontline staff while 1 million and 4.78 million households were provided with free water and electricity, respectively.

 

  1. Speaker, to facilitate the mass reopening of schools, Government provided 11 million students and staff with essential supplies such as face masks, paper towels, liquid soap, and hand sanitisers, all at great cost. Cooked meals were also provided to final year JHS Students in both public and private schools.

 

  1. Speaker, these have been very costly but necessary. We knew that the cost of doing nothing and disrupting the education of our children for an entire academic year would have been even greater.

 

  1. Speaker, I am proud to announce that not a single Ghanaian public sector worker was laid off as a result of the pandemic. We paid them monthly with regularity and we are grateful to the Unions for their cooperation.

 

  1. Under the Coronavirus Alleviation Programme Business Support Scheme (CAPBuSS), Ghana Enterprises Agency provided 302,001 successful applicants, across various sectors and regions, with loans amounting to GH¢523.11

 

  1. Speaker, we also ensured prompt payment of our obligations to contractors and provided payroll support to some State-owned Enterprises to guarantee jobs.

 

 

  1. Our President led and acted, decisively and intelligently, and his leadership paved the way for many other countries in Africa and

 

  1. Speaker, let me assure the House that we are working hard to get back quickly to the pre-pandemic fiscal and debt trajectory. The fiscal policies implemented to provide relief during the pandemic have led to an increase in total public debt. The situation was made worse by the big drop in revenue collections last year resulting from the pandemic. Total revenues in 2020 fell by GH¢11.93 billion, equivalent to 3.1 percent of GDP, while total expenditures increased by GH¢14.08 billion, equivalent to 3.7 percent of GDP.

 

  1. As a result, a budget deficit of 7 percent of GDP was recorded against a target of 4.7 percent of GDP. The pandemic accounted for 58 percent of this deficit (equivalent to 6.8 percent of GDP).

 

  1. Including the financial sector and energy sector related expenditures, the budget deficit was 15.0 percent of GDP. GDP growth also dropped to 0.4 percent, compared to a projected growth rate of 6.8 percent before the pandemic. This growth, however, compares favourably with the sub-Saharan African average of negative 7 percent.

 

  1. Speaker, we are under no illusions as to the economic challenges facing our country today. How to ease the sufferings of Ghanaians, transform the economy to create jobs and share the expected wealth across all households, are what keeps the President awake at night. How to broaden the revenue base, keep a grip on expenditure, protect the public purse and at the same time build with urgency the needed infrastructure, pay the bills and stimulate economic activity are the orders he has given to us, his Ministers and other appointees, to carry out over the next three years.

 

  1. Speaker, we know we can get the job done. It is well-known that prior to the pandemic, we had stabilised and turned around the economy between January 2017 and March 2020. We had reversed the worrying economic trend we inherited and placed the country on a path of fiscal sustainability and growth. We almost doubled the economic growth rate from 3.4 percent to 6.5 percent during that period. It is undisputed that:
    • We brought down the fiscal deficit below the 5 percent threshold;
    • We improved our gross international reserves from US$4.9 billion (2.8 months of imports) to US$9.9 billion (4.7 months of imports);
    • We provided free SHS for 2 million Ghanaian students;
    • We provided free hot meals for 4 million pupils in basic schools;
    • We supported 9 million farmers with improved seedlings and fertilizers through our Planting for Food and Jobs programme;

 

  • We provided temporary employment to 100,000 of our young people through the NABCo programme;
  • We abolished several nuisance taxes; and
  • We set the nation on its biggest private sector-owned industrialisation programme in the history of Ghana with the 1D1F programme; and
  • We registered the biggest foreign exchange earnings from tourists during our historic 2019 Year of Return

 

  1. By March, 2020 our first quarter macro-fiscal indicators reflected the turnaround we had accomplished over the three and a half years. Indeed, we had just experienced an oversubscription of our US$3.0 billion bond issuance on the International Capital Market as a result of strong investor confidence. The transaction comprised US$525 million for a 4-Year Zero Coupon, US$1 billion for 7-year tenor priced at 7.75 percent, US$1 billion for a 12-year at 8.625 percent and US$500 million for 20-year tenor with a coupon of 875 percent.

 

  1. Speaker, then COVID struck! And the health and economic impacts have been devastating.

 

  1. The focus of the 2021 Budget Statement and Economic Policy presented on 12th March, 2021 was anchored on debt sustainability and consolidation while providing some fiscal We set out to complete ongoing programmes and projects, consolidate the gains from the recovery efforts and continue our agenda towards the revitalization and transformation of the economy.

 

  1. Today, 17th November, 2021, I am here, on behalf of H.E. The President to provide this House with an update on progress made towards post-pandemic economic recovery following the confidence Ghanaians reposed in him with a renewed mandate on 7th December,

 

  1. Speaker, the pandemic has reminded us of the urgent need to chart a new path of disciplined self-reliance to transform our lives. We need to raise more domestic resources to develop our country and support our youth to realise their potential to innovate and find solutions to address our needs.

 

  1. Speaker, the Ghana Statistical Service has completed the preliminary report on the 2021 Population and Housing Census. The Census provided critical information that will inform the effective planning and implementation of Government policies. However, the data presented also shows some trends that need to be addressed to build a more equitable society.

 

  1. The Census results put Ghana’s population figure at 30.8 million and of this number, 8 percent constitutes the adult population above 18 years while 58.2

 

percent constitutes the population below 18 years. Interestingly, out of the total population of 30.8 million:

  • only 2,364,348 persons (less than 10 percent of the total population) are registered as tax payers as at August 2021;
  • only 1,643,839 persons (about 5 percent of the total population) are captured by SSNIT as active contributors to Tier 1 pensions and 2,107,322 (less than 10 percent of the total population) as active contributors to Tier 2 as at June 2021;
  • only 45,109 entities are registered as corporate taxpayers while 54,364 persons are registered as self-employed taxpayers at the Ghana Revenue Authority; and
  • only 136,198 entities are registered businesses at the Registrar-General’s Department as at August 2021 of which 80 percent are classified as self-

 

  1. Speaker, compared to our peers within the middle-income bracket, these statistics are a poor reflection on us and we need to change the narrative. We must urgently work together to simplify our processes to ensure that the millions of our fellow Ghanaians both in the informal and formal sectors contribute their quota towards our transformation agenda.

 

  1. Speaker, the need for solutions has become even more heightened when we observe that every year, over 100,000 young people graduate from our tertiary institutions onto the job market. We have also witnessed the depressingly long queues for jobs in the public sector.

 

  1. Speaker, over the past 15 years, successive Governments have endeavoured to implement various employment schemes to partially address the unemployment situation in the country. In 2006, Former President J. A. Kufuor initiated the Youth Employment scheme which provided meaningful employment avenues to many of our youth. Since then, we have implemented a number of such schemes with the current ones being:
    • Nation Builders Corps (NABCo – 100,000 youth covered);
    • Youth Employment Agency (YEA – 80,538 beneficiaries);
    • National Afforestation Programme (44,682 youth engaged); and
    • National Alternative Employment and Livelihood Programme (NAELP).

 

  1. In addition, Government has employed almost 300,000 onto the public payroll since 2017 in key essential services sectors. In 2021 alone, financial clearance totalling 72,825 has been granted. Government will selectively continue to employ the needed manpower within the public sector to boost

 

  1. Speaker, while these efforts have helped to close the manpower gaps, we continue to have a huge number of our young people who are without jobs and

 

the requisite competencies. It is expected that 6 million young people will join the labour force by 2024 while 9 million jobs in Ghana will require digital skills by 2030.

 

  1. Speaker, clearly, we need a more sustainable strategy. It is obvious that we have to review the curriculum in our universities and other tertiary institutions. We will need to train 50 percent of our graduates to acquire the needed skills required for the job market in future. For those who are out of school, we will provide them with opportunities to gain the needed skills for employment or start a business. The “future begins with our youth”, meaning, the surest way for each of us to be “self-sufficient”, comes not from “waiting for a job” but rather by encouraging ourselves to apply our creativity and skills towards manifesting opportunities across various fields.

 

  1. Speaker, this Budget outlines our plan to sustain the recovery efforts from the socio-economic impact of the pandemic and get us quickly back to our pre- pandemic growth trajectory and a sustainable debt path. It also outlines the strategies to address one of the major problems of our time, which is youth unemployment. Furthermore, it outlines Government’s efforts at improving the quality of living standards while ensuring peace and security.

 

  1. Speaker, a new Medium-Term National Development Policy Framework (2022-2025), has been prepared as a successor to the current Medium-Term National Development Policy Framework (MTNDPF) – An Agenda for Jobs: Creating Prosperity and Equal Opportunity for All (2018-2021), to provide the overall framework for medium-term economic recovery and transformation for the country.

 

  1. More specifically, Government prepared the Ghana COVID-19 Alleviation and Revitalisation of Enterprises Support (GhanaCARES “Obaatan Pa”) Programme as a direct response to the COVID-19 pandemic to revitalise and transform the economy to enable us “build forward better”. Government will continue to support the productive sectors of the economy, as well as the vulnerable through the implementation of the “Obaatan Pa” Programme, Government’s key flagship interventions, and targeted social intervention programmes. The protection of lives and livelihoods is still of the highest priority as we recover from the

 

  1. Against this background, this Budget is anchored on the following broad macroeconomic objectives for the medium-term:
    • Ensuring restoration and sustained macroeconomic stability with a focus on debt sustainability;

 

  • Maintaining a good balance between the implementation of the revitalisation and transformation programme and fiscal consolidation to promote growth within a stable macroeconomic environment;
  • Providing a supportive private sector environment (including promoting entrepreneurship) for domestic businesses and for Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) to thrive;
  • Building a robust financial sector to support growth and development; and
  • Deepening structural reforms to make the machinery of Government work more efficiently and effectively to support socio-economic In particular, implementing reforms to increase revenue mobilisation and the efficiency of public expenditure.

 

  1. Speaker, the YouStart initiative was originally announced as YouBanc in my special message to the youth in the 2021 Mid-Year Review. This initiative forms part of the “Obaatan Pa” programme launched in November 2020 to spearhead our revitalisation and recovery from the pandemic.

 

  1. Under the “Obaatan Pa” programme, we expect a fully operational Development Bank Ghana (DBG) by end-December The DBG will ease the constraints of long-term financing at competitive rates for entrepreneurs to propel economic growth, create jobs, and expand the domestic revenue base.

 

  1. With the recent restructuring of the financial sector, the financial ecosystem has been repositioned with significant depth and scope to extend the needed support to businesses. That is how we are transforming the financial architecture and landscape to drive a new age of entrepreneurship, job creation and wealth

 

  1. Speaker, this rich tapestry of coordinated support is meant to ignite and unleash the innovative and entrepreneurial spirit of our young people. It is to mark a conscious departure from job seeking towards job creation and job ownership. We are nurturing a self-confident and business savvy generation which leverages the AfCFTA for economic transformation. With the anticipated multiplier effect of YouStart, we will become an entrepreneurial nation with a great army of curious, competent and compassionate actors empowered to conquer opportunities at home and beyond.

 

  1. Speaker, we will also support other targeted and youth employment focused interventions such as the Community Improvement Initiative and the National Alternative Employment and Livelihood Programme (NAELP) which was launched by the President on 25th October, 2021. Through the NAELP, we will protect the environment and our water bodies from illegal mining activities by providing

 

alternatives such as support and skills training for small-scale illegal miners and other people affected by illegal mining.

 

  1. This programme will help conserve our natural environment now and for future It will also support efforts to leverage the natural environment as an asset to access climate finance for programmes at both the local and central levels of Government. Through our programmes to revitalise the economy, we will prioritise and finance innovations that optimise our climate advantage and drive our adoption of renewable energy technologies.

 

  1. Speaker, we will continue to work with Parliament as a partner for development to make this endeavour a success. This Budget is about changing mindsets. We will consolidate our gains, boost revenue mobilisation, keep Ghana on the cutting edge of digital advancement, and build an entrepreneurial nation.

 

  1. Towards that effort, the theme for this budget is “Building a sustainable entrepreneurial nation: Fiscal Consolidation and Job creation”. A key focus of the 2022 budget is fiscal consolidation to enhance debt and fiscal sustainability as we implement our economic revitalisation and transformation programme post COVID-19 to save more lives from the COVID-19 pandemic and better the lives of Ghanaians. It is for this reason that Government is proposing for the consideration and approval of Parliament the revenue enhancing and expenditure rationalisation measures in this budget. In deed the approval and implementation of the measures will lead to significant fiscal adjustment from a projected fiscal deficit (including Energy IPP Payments and Finsec Clean-up cost) of 12.1% of GDP in 2021 to 7.4% in 2022, representing an adjustment of 4.7 percentage points in just one year. Mr. Speaker not only are we significantly bringing the fiscal deficit down, we are posting a primary surplus of 0.1% of GDP in 2022 from a negative primary balance of 7% in 2021.

 

  1. Speaker, I now proceed to give details of the 2021 budget performance for the first nine months of the year and the 2022-2025 medium-term budget proposals. Mr. Speaker these measures will no doubt slow down debt accumulation and will put the debt to GDP ratio on a declining path.

The sections will focus on the:

  • Global economic developments and outlook;
  • Macroeconomic performance;
  • Medium-term objectives and targets;
  • Transforming the economy beyond COVID-19 pandemic; and
  • Sectoral performance and

 

SECTION TWO: GLOBAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENTS AND OUTLOOK

Economic Growth
  1. Speaker, the Covid-19 pandemic—with its associated health and economic risks, fuelled by the new Delta variant—continues to weaken the global recovery momentum. Information from the Worldodometer COVID-19 Dashboard indicates that the global death toll from the pandemic has surpassed the 5 million—specifically 5,126,659 as at 17:42 GMT, 16th November, 2021.

 

  1. Speaker, data from the IMF’s October 2021 World Economic Outlook (WEO) indicate that the global economy is estimated to grow at 5.9 percent in 2021. Although this is a 0.1 percentage point lower compared to the July 2021 WEO update, it is still a significant improvement over the 3.1 percent contraction recorded in 2020. However, the global economic growth forecast for 2022 remains unchanged at 4.9 percent from the July 2021 projection.

 

  1. Speaker, the 2021 global growth projection reflects an expected increase in vaccine rollout powered by economic activity and stronger financial conditions from advanced economies. So far, according to the WHO, almost 7.2 billion doses of COVID-19 vaccines have been rolled out globally as at 11th November, 2021.

 

  1. Speaker, the growth prospects, however, remain varied across regional blocs and differ significantly between countries and across sectors, reflecting the different pace of vaccinations and removal of COVID-19 restrictions. While advanced economies have achieved 60 percent full vaccination of their population, only 4 percent of the population in low-income countries have been vaccinated. The continued spread of the Delta variant, amid stalled vaccination efforts across emerging market and developing economies, would additionally continue to heighten uncertainty about the global growth outlook, especially in those countries.

 

  1. Speaker, growth in advanced economies is projected at 5.2 percent in 2021, up from the 4.5 percent contraction experienced in 2020. In the United States, growth is expected to hit 6.0 percent in 2021, reflecting the impact of a new infrastructure bill and a social spending budget equivalent to USD$4 trillion over a 10-year period. Similarly, growth rates in the Euro Area and Japan are expected to pick up to 5.0 percent and 2.4 percent, respectively in 2021, reflecting robust recovery powered by the continuous and increasing access to vaccines.

 

  1. Speaker, economic performance in emerging markets and developing economies is forecasted to increase from the 2.1 percent contraction in 2020 to

6.4 percent growth in 2021, before moderating slightly to 5.1 percent in 2022. Much of this growth is underpinned by improved activity for commodity exporters

 

(in Latin America and the Caribbean, Middle East and Central Asia, sub-Saharan Africa) and stronger-than-anticipated domestic demand in parts of emerging and developing Europe.

 

  1. Speaker, the Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) region — home of the world’s least vaccinated population — remains in the grip of the ongoing pandemic. According to the IMF’s October 2021 edition of the Regional Economic Outlook for Sub- Saharan Africa, the COVID-19 pandemic has thrown about 30 million people into extreme poverty in the region and has worsened inequality across income groups amidst already existing social tensions and political instability.

 

  1. Speaker, growth in the SSA region is expected to recover from the 1.7 percent contraction recorded in 2020 to 3.7 percent in 2021, albeit the slowest growth compared to recoveries in other parts of the world. Rising commodity prices and improved economic activity in the first 6 months of 2021 will account for this growth. In 2022, the region is projected to grow at 3.8 percent. There is, however, much uncertainty about SSA’s growth prospects, given the latest wave of the pandemic in its deadlier Delta variant.

 

  1. Speaker, tourism-dependent SSA countries (Cabo Verde, Comoros, The Gambia, Mauritius, São Tomé and Príncipe, Seychelles) continue to face recovery challenges in the wake of the pandemic, and some (particularly Cabo Verde and Mauritius) have been projected to lose incomes close to about 15 percent of their GDP as a result. Nonetheless, a few countries (Comoros and The Gambia) have fared relatively better because of significant remittance inflows, which have supported private consumption.

 

Inflation
  1. Speaker, global inflation has been declining over the past half century. However, since January 2021, headline inflation has generally trended upwards in most parts of advanced and emerging markets economies, driven by strong demand, rising commodity prices, input shortages, and supply chain disruptions. Inflation in advanced economies is projected at 2.8 percent for 2021, up from the 0.7 percent recorded in 2020.

 

  1. In emerging markets and developing economies, inflation is expected to increase by 4 percentage points to 5.5 percent in 2021. Looking ahead, headline inflation is projected to peak in the final months of 2021, with inflation expected back to pre-pandemic levels by mid-2022 for both advanced economies and emerging markets country groups.

 

  1. As emphasized in the October 2021 Regional Economic Outlook for SSA, higher food prices have impacted headline inflation expectations in the region. Average food price inflation has been on the ascendency from 2 percent year-on-year in

 

2019 to about 11 percent in 2021, reflecting poor weather conditions and conflict- related supply disruptions. Annual average inflation in SSA is, nonetheless, projected to decline to 8.6 percent in 2022.

 

  1. However, inflation is expected to be lower in the region’s two monetary unions (West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU), and Central African Economic and Monetary Community (CEMAC)), despite heightened inflationary pressures caused by supply disruptions and a pickup in economic

 

  1. There is a mixed reaction to Whereas countries facing rising inflationary pressures have increased central bank policy rates (Mozambique, Zambia), others with relatively stable inflation (Ghana, Nigeria, Uganda) have maintained or reduced rates to ensure economic stability in the COVID-19 era.

 

Commodity Prices
  1. Commodity prices have surpassed pre-pandemic levels, supported by favourable global trade recovery and strong demand from advanced countries in That notwithstanding, merchandise trade has recovered swiftly with service trade lagging behind due to COVID-19 pandemic-related restrictions.

 

  1. Crude oil prices rose by 9 percent between February and August 2021 on the back of rapid economic recovery in advanced economies. According to the October 2021 IMF WEO, crude oil prices will average US$65.68 per barrel (close to 60 percent above the 2020 base price) for 2021 and US$64.52 per barrel for 2022 and will remain unchanged over the medium-term. This is in line with market tightness and oil demand recovery projections.

 

  1. However, beyond 2022, it is expected that lower global production capacity (due to a decline in investment over the past year), prolonged price support by OPEC+, rise of the Delta COVID-19 variant, increased output from uncommitted OPEC+ members (Iran, Libya, Venezuela), as well as US shale oil producers will moderate crude oil prices.

 

  1. The World Bank’s Precious Metals Index decreased by 3 percent year-on-year in the third quarter of 2021 due to declining investor sentiment stemming from higher real interest rates and a stronger U.S. dollar, as well as lower physical According to the Commodity Markets Outlook of the World Bank, October 2021 edition, gold prices declined by 1.4 percent in the third quarter driven by a slump in investment demand amid a rise in interest rate yields. Gold prices are anticipated to average US$1,788 per troy oz in 2021, before falling to US$1,711 per troy oz in 2022 due to higher interest rate yields in the United States.

 

  1. Global cocoa production for the just ended 2020/21 crop season increased by about 10 percent compared to the 2019/20 crop season, occasioned mainly by favourable weather conditions in West Africa, especially in Côte d’Ivoire, the world’s largest cocoa supplier. Cocoa prices have been generally stable since October 2020, within a band of US$2,300 per tonne and US$2,550 per tonne and is expected to remain stable in 2021 and 2022, as the global market is adequately supplied and as COVID-19 related disruptions gradually ease. Data from the International Cocoa Organization (ICCO) also show that the average daily price of cocoa futures contract stood at US$2,322 per tonne in London during the 2020/21 crop season, down by almost 2 percent year-on-year from US$2,358 per tonne recorded in the preceding

 

Mid –Year 2021 Macroeconomic Developments – ECOWAS Sub- Region
  1. The COVID-19 pandemic negatively impacted ECOWAS economies and reversed major economic gains recorded in recent years. According to the IMF’s October 2021 edition of the Regional Economic Outlook for SSA, GDP growth in the ECOWAS sub-region contracted by 0.6 percent in 2020 against the 3.5 percent growth rate recorded in both 2018 and 2019. Growth is, however, expected to rebound to pre-pandemic levels to 6 percent in 2021 and increase further to

4.0 percent in 2022, mainly due to COVID-19 containment measures and improving trade activities.

 

  1. In the WAEMU bloc of ECOWAS, GDP growth slowed down considerably to 1.8 percent in 2020 from the 7 percent growth recorded in 2019 but has rebounded to 5.5 percent in 2021.

 

  1. Major economies in the region including Nigeria, Ghana, and Cote d’Ivoire recorded slower growth rates in 2020 compared to 2019, while the economy of Cape Verdi recorded the worst contraction of nearly 15 percent from a 7 percent growth in 2019. However, Guinea’s growth improved to 7.1 percent in 2020, up from 5.6 percent in 2019, mainly attributable to a boost in production in the mining sub-sector and improvement in power supply. All countries in the sub- regional bloc are projected to rebound from the ravages of the pandemic and record healthy growth rates in both 2021 and 2022, as shown in Table 1.

 

Table 1: ECOWAS Growth Rates (% Annual)

Country

2018

2019

2020

2021*

2022*

ECOWAS Average

3.5

3.5

-0.6

3.6

4.0

WAEMU Average

6.4

5.7

1.8

5.5

6.1

Ghana

6.2

6.5

0.4

4.7

6.2

Cote d’Ivoire

6.9

6.2

2.0

6.0

6.5

Senegal

6.2

4.4

1.5

4.7

5.5

Guinea

6.4

5.6

7.1

5.2

6.3

Burkina Faso

6.7

5.7

1.9

6.7

5.6

 

 

Benin

6.7

6.9

3.8

5.5

6.5

 

Guinea Bissau

3.4

4.5

-1.4

3.3

4.0

Mali

4.7

4.8

-1.6

4.0

5.3

Niger

7.2

5.9

3.6

5.4

6.6

Togo

5.0

5.5

1.8

4.8

5.9

Cape Verde

4.5

5.7

-14.8

4.0

6.5

Gambia

7.2

6.2

0.2

4.9

6.0

Sierra Leone

3.5

5.5

-2.2

3.2

5.9

Liberia

1.2

-2.5

-3.0

3.6

4.7

Nigeria

1.9

2.2

-1.8

2.6

2.7

Source: IMF, Regional Economic Outlook Sub-Saharan Africa October 2021 *projections

 

  1. In the ECOWAS sub-region, annual average inflation increased to 2 percent in 2020 from 8.2 percent in 2019 and is poised to edge up further to 12.4 percent 2021, before easing down to 9.9 percent in 2022. This reflects the supply-side constraints and shortages of foodstuff and other essential commodities, arising mainly from closure of national borders and other measures imposed to contain the spread of the coronavirus through importation.

 

  1. Inflation edged up to 2.2 percent in the CFA Zone of ECOWAS in 2020 from a deflation of 6 percent in 2019 and is expected to increase further to 2.9 in 2021, the highest rate in 13 years as indicated in Table 2. However, inflation is expected to moderate to 2.3 percent in the CFA Zone in 2022.

 

  1. Of the five Anglophone countries in the sub-region, only Ghana’s inflation rate of

9.9 percent was below the regional average in 2020. Ghana’s annual average inflation rate is projected to decline further to 9.3 percent and 8.8 percent in 2021 and 2022, respectively.

 

Table 2: ECOWAS Consumer Price Inflation (annual averages)

Country

2018

2019

2020

2021*

2022*

ECOWAS Average

9.3

8.2

10.2

12.4

9.9

WAEMU Average

1.1

-0.6

2.2

2.9

2.3

Togo

0.9

0.7

1.8

2.7

2.5

Benin

0.8

-0.9

3.0

3.0

2.0

Burkina Faso

2.0

-3.2

1.9

3.0

2.6

Cape Verde

1.3

1.1

0.6

1.5

1.6

Cote d’Ivoire

0.4

0.8

2.4

3.0

2.5

Guinea Bissau

0.4

0.3

1.5

1.9

2.0

Senegal

0.5

1.0

2.5

2.4

2.0

Mali

1.7

-2.9

0.5

3.0

2.0

Niger

2.8

-2.5

2.9

2.9

2.5

Gambia

6.5

7.1

5.9

7.0

6.3

 

 

Guinea

9.8

9.5

10.6

11.6

9.9

Ghana

9.8

7.1

9.9

9.3

8.8

Liberia

23.5

27.0

17.0

5.9

11.8

Nigeria

12.1

11.4

13.2

16.9

13.3

Sierra Leone

16.0

14.8

13.4

11.3

13.3

Source: IMF, Regional Economic Outlook Sub-Saharan Africa October 2021

*projection

 

Performance on Rationalised ECOWAS Convergence Criteria
  1. The COVID-19 pandemic has also undermined the progress made in previous years in the ECOWAS region regarding performance under macroeconomic convergence criteria. Due to the impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on lives and livelihoods, the ECOWAS Authority of Heads of State and Government suspended the convergence criteria for 2020 and As at end-2020, no ECOWAS member state had met any of the six rationalised convergence criteria, taking both the primary and secondary criteria into consideration. The general performance under the primary criteria worsened in 2020, as no member state satisfied any of the four primary convergence criteria, compared to 2019 where seven (7) member states met the criteria (Benin, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Cote d’Ivoire, Mali, Niger and Togo).

 

  1. Out of the 15 member states, only 2 (Liberia and Guinea) satisfied the criteria on budget deficit in 2020 compared to eight (Benin, Cabo Verde, Cote d’Ivoire, The Gambia, Guinea, Liberia, Mali, and Togo) in 2019, mainly due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on revenue generation and expenditure rationalisation. Apart from Liberia, the budget deficit worsened in all member states, with the highest recorded by Ghana and Cape Verde.

 

  1. Performance on the inflation criterion remained unchanged as nine (9) member states satisfied the target at end-December 2019 and 2020 as indicated in Table
  2. Liberia remained the worst performer in the last three years, recording the highest inflation rate of 17.0 percent in the region, followed by Sierra Leone and Nigeria.

 

  1. Outturn on the Central Bank Financing of Budget Deficit criterion declined as nine

(9) member states met the target at end-December 2020, compared to thirteen in the same period of 2019. The Criterion on Gross External Reserves was met by thirteen (13) countries in 2020 compared to fourteen (14) countries in 2019.

 

  1. With respect to the secondary criteria, all member states met the criterion on nominal exchange rate stability, while performance on public debt declined. The criterion on nominal exchange rate stability was met by all member states at end- December 2020 compared with fourteen at end-December 2019. Liberia missed this criterion between 2017 and However, due to the proactive monetary

 

policy stance and subdued demand for foreign exchange, the country was able to meet this criterion in 2020.

 

  1. Compliance with public debt criteria dropped in 2020, as twelve (12) member states met the target at end-December 2020 compared to thirteen (13) in 2019, reflecting COVID-19-related funding needs of member states.

 

  1. Projections based on data from the West African Monetary Agency, Regional Analysis Report, Volume 1 indicate that in 2021 no member state will meet all the macroeconomic convergence criteria, same as in 2020. Two (2) countries (Guinea and Liberia) are expected to satisfy the budget deficit criteria while eleven (11) countries are expected to meet the central bank financing of budget deficit Performance on average inflation is expected to remain unchanged at nine (9) member states in 2021. The WAMZ countries are expected to miss the target mainly occasioned by exchange rate pass-through effect to inflation. Concerning gross external reserves in months of import cover, fourteen (14) member states are expected to meet the target in 2021, supported by increased foreign exchange earnings from trade after relaxation of Covid-19 restrictions in 2021, an improvement over thirteen (13) Member States in 2020.

 

  1. Projections for the benchmarks under the secondary criteria show that all fifteen

(15) member states are expected to satisfy the target on exchange rate stability, while performance on the public debt criterion will slip in 2021, as eleven (11) countries are expected to comply with the target against twelve in 2020. This will be occasioned by the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic, which is narrowing fiscal space and expanding debt levels due to the heightened recourse to borrowing to finance the widening fiscal deficits.

 

  1. The short-term outlook is, however, promising as growth is expected to recover in all member states of the ECOWAS, premised on ongoing efforts aimed at vaccinating the populace against the coronavirus, gradual easing of the restrictions, and progressive resumption of economic activities. The forecasts show that aggregate output of the Community will expand, supported by significant recoveries in Ghana, Benin, Cote d’Ivoire, and Nigeria. However, the downside risk to this favourable prospect is the uncertainties regarding the third wave of the pandemic, which is projected to be potentially very dangerous.

 

Ghana’s First Half 2021 Performance on Rationalised ECOWAS Convergence Criteria
  1. According to the 2021 Half-Year ECOWAS Multilateral Surveillance report, Ghana achieved three (3) out of the six (6) ECOWAS Rationalised Macroeconomic Convergence Criteria in 2021 as presented below in Table 2. Ghana met two (2) out of the four (4) Primary Convergence Criteria in 2021, namely, zero central

 

bank financing and the gross international reserves cover of at least three months of imports.

 

  1. With regards to the secondary criteria, Ghana met one out of the two criteria, specifically, the nominal exchange rate variation of within ±10 percent

 

  1. In the near term, Government, through its economic revitalisation programme will seek to expand the economy with the provision of targeted fiscal stimuli while also ensuring fiscal sustainability to cushion the impact of COVID-19 on businesses and to facilitate a quick and strong recovery of our economy. Thus, this will be done without undermining fiscal consolidation

 

Table 3: ECOWAS Rationalized Convergence Criteria (June 2021)

 

 

 

 

No.

 

 

 

Convergence Criteria

 

 

 

Target

 

Number of Countries that met Criteria in 2019

 

Number of Countries that met Criteria in 2020

Number of Countries that    are expected to     meet the Criteria

2021*

 

 

 

Ghana June 2021

 

Primary Criteria

1

Budget Deficit (Incl. Grants)/GDP

≤ 3%

8

2

2

5.1% (Not achieved)

2

Inflation (annual average)

≤ 5%

9

9

9

7.8% (Not achieved)

3

Central Bank Budget Deficit Financing

10%

14

13

14

zero financing (Achieved)

4

Gross External Reserves

≥3 months

13

9

12

5.0 Months (Achieved)

 

Secondary Criteria

5

Nominal Exchange Rate

± 10%

14

15

15

0.0% (Achieved)

6

Public Debt /GDP

≤ 70%

13

12

11

76.2% (Not Achieved)

Source: GoG, BOG, MoF

 

Implementation of ECOWAS Brown Card Insurance Scheme
  1. Speaker, the ECOWAS Brown Card Insurance Scheme was established in May 1982 by Protocol A/P1/5/82 to promote trade and services, facilitate tourism, and ensure the free movement of people across the borders of member states of ECOWAS. This Protocol has been revised and subsequently repealed by Supplementary Act A/SA.01/06/20, which was signed by the Authority of the Heads of State and Government of ECOWAS, under the Chairmanship of His Excellency President Nana Addo Dankwah Akuffo-Addo, in Accra on 17th June, 2021.

 

  1. The Brown Card Insurance Scheme provides insurance covers against Third Party liabilities that visiting motorists from other member states may incur while driving across various national borders of ECOWAS member states, and ensures prompt and fair payment of compensation to victims of motor accidents caused by motorists visiting territories of other ECOWAS Member

 

  1. The Ghana National Bureau of the ECOWAS Brown Card Insurance Scheme (Bureau) implements the scheme in Ghana. Since January 2021, despite the COVID-19 Pandemic, the Bureau has been able to organise orientation programmes for personnel of the Motor Traffic and Transport Department (MTTD) of the Ghana Police Service for all the Command posts in the regions

 

through which the two major international road corridors pass through, namely: Elubo to Aflao and Tema to Paga.

 

  1. The Bureau held five meetings with the National Bureaux of other member countries on cross-border accident cases and the emanating claims between those countries and Ghana, resulting in the successful settlement of many of the long outstanding claims on the books of the Bureau, both in favour and against Despite the success of the Scheme, differences in legal regimes governing insurance operations in various member states, harassment of visiting motorists by security personnel and other government agencies, and low-key stakeholder awareness on ECOWAS Brown Card Insurance is adversely affecting the smooth operationalisation of the scheme.

 

  1. It is, however, imperative that these challenges are resolved through strict implementation of the new Supplementary Act A/SA.01/06/20 of the Brown Card Insurance Scheme. Government remains very supportive of the Scheme and will advocate through appropriate channels for strict adherence to the protocol by member

 

Implementation of ECOWAS Common External Tariff (CET)
  1. Speaker, the Authority of Heads of State and Government of ECOWAS, at the close of its Extraordinary Session held on 25th October, 2013 in Dakar, adopted the implementation of the ECOWAS Common External Tariff (CET) by member states effective from 1st January, 2015.

 

  1. The implementation of the ECOWAS Common External Tariff is intended to boost ECOWAS economic integration, increase intra-regional trade, and improve domestic production, while also addressing the challenge of cross-border smuggling and

 

  1. All member states are currently applying the ECOWAS CET in its Harmonised System (HS) 2017 version, except for the Gambia. The actual implementation of the ECOWAS CET is the obligation of member states. As such, differences exist in several member states with regards to the tariffs applied both in terms of nomenclature and applied

 

  1. CET implementation in Ghana offers more protection to the agricultural sector relative to other sectors. Thus, more than 50 percent of Ghana’s agricultural products are protected under the 20 percent and 35 percent tariff Bands. According to the latest Evaluation Report on the Implementation of the ECOWAS CET in member states, the introduction of CET has positively impacted national revenue of member Also, eight (8) out of the fourteen (14) member states that are currently applying the CET recorded economic growth rates of more than 5 percent in 2018.

 

 

  1. Despite the success of the ECOWAS CET, insufficient training and awareness in member states means that private sector stakeholders do not have a clear understanding of how to take ownership of the ECOWAS CET. Another major concern is in respect of the Coding and varied Tax Rates under the HS Heading, which often give rise to abuses in determining the appropriate customs duties applicable on a particular

 

  1. Bearing in mind the challenges identified, we urge the ECOWAS Commission to take all necessary measures to build the capacity of the various stakeholders and carry out communication and awareness actions on the ECOWAS CET and its subsequent

 

  1. Government, through Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Trade and Industry, and Customs Division of the Ghana Revenue Authority will be tasked to review all relevant processes for the benefit of Ghanaian businesses.

 

ECOWAS Trade Liberalisation Scheme (ETLS)
  1. The ECOWAS Trade Liberalisation Scheme (ETLS) provides the framework for the elimination of trade barriers on intra-regional trade in the ECOWAS It also has the objectives to increase intra-regional exports, improve trade links, and facilitate free movement of unprocessed goods, traditional handicraft, and industrial products.

 

  1. According to the latest Evaluation Report on the Implementation of the ECOWAS Trade Liberalisation Scheme, the implementation of ETLS has led to a significant increase in the number of ECOWAS products and enterprises registered under the scheme. Between January and October 2021, the Ghana National Approvals Committee approved 65 products from 31 enterprises to benefit under the

 

  1. The major constraint of the scheme is the presence of many trade regulatory agencies at various ECOWAS borders which cause delays at the border and limits the objective of ETLS of reducing the number of days of moving imports and exports across national The existence of multiple preferential tariffs and multiple approval processes creates confusion for customs personnel, exporters, and importers, leading to unnecessary detention of goods. The lack of commitment by some sovereign member states to ensure full compliance with the protocols, particularly along neighbouring borders, continues to affect operations of Ghanaian companies adversely.

 

  1. ETLS can considerably augment the levels of intra-community trade through digitalising and making user-friendly the ETLS application procedures. There is the need for the region to simplify, strengthen and harmonise the implementation of the various Rules of Origin in the region.

 

 

  1. Finally, Government will ensure regular monitoring, evaluation, and revision of the performance of the ETLS process. Government has already constituted an inter-ministerial taskforce to address the trade facilitation and transit issues and will also empower the National Approvals Committee to embark on sensitisation programmes to inform businesses and enterprises, particularly companies under the One-District-One-Factory (1D1F) Initiative, about the benefits of the

 

Implications of Global Developments for Ghana’s Economy
  1. Given the global growth recovery momentum, the Ghanaian economy is likely to be impacted positively through trade spill overs, supported by strong recoveries in advanced economies. With the boost in export and commodity prices, Ghana is expected to fare better since international prices of its three   major export commodities (gold, cocoa, and crude oil) have been projected to edge These expected price developments will have implications for the trade balance and the current account in the near term. Global merchandise trade has now returned to pre-pandemic levels with the global economy opening and global COVID-restrictions easing up. This uptick in international trade activities will propel an improvement in revenue generation through port activities in the economy.

 

  1. Despite the global recovery, the pandemic has caused outbreaks in critical links of global supply chains which have resulted in longer-than-expected supply disruptions, further feeding into higher inflation rates in many Average inflation is expected to edge up slightly in 2021 on the back of supply disruptions and a pickup in economic activity, but with differences in the intensity of inflationary pressures across countries.

 

  1. For those countries experiencing heightened inflationary pressures, monetary policy has had to be tightened to contain With inflation levels in Ghana expected to be relatively stable for the year 2021, it is prudent that the policy rate is adjusted appropriately in a bid to continue to offer support to complement overall economic policies of Government to boost economic growth.

 

  1. This optimism about the prospects of global growth comes on the back of efforts the global community is putting in place to ensure equitable vaccine access for every country, overcome vaccine hesitancy where there is adequate supply, and secure better economic prospects for Given that Ghana has been selected as a possible manufacturing hub for COVID-19 vaccines in Africa, plans that are already underway should be intensified in other to realise the initiative which has a potential to boost the pharmaceutical industry in Ghana.

 

  1. With the pandemic still dragging on, uncertainty in the tourism sector remains unsettled, and the outlook for tourism-dependent economies and cross-border services remains Travel restrictions and lingering fears of contagion are likely to weigh on cross-border tourist activity until the virus transmission declines substantially. Smart strategies and initiatives need to be put in place to move and maintain the tourism sector at pre-COVID levels since tourism and travel contribute a sizable share to GDP. This will help avert dwindling interest and activity as well as loss of revenues in the sector.

 

SECTION THREE: MACROECONOMIC PERFORMANCE FOR JANUARY-SEPTEMBER 2021

Overview of Macroeconomic Performance
  1. Speaker, I now present to this august House the provisional macroeconomic performance for the first three quarters of 2021 based on available data for the period.

 

  1. Speaker, to better evaluate the macroeconomic developments for the first three quarters of the year, permit me to restate the macroeconomic targets set for 2021 as presented in the 2021 Mid-Year Review documents as follows:
  2. Overall real GDP growth rate of 1 percent;
  3. Overall non-oil real GDP growth rate of 0 percent;
  • End-period December year-on-year inflation of 0 percent;
  1. Overall budget deficit (on cash basis) of 4 percent of GDP;
  2. Primary balance of -2.0 percent of GDP; and
  3. Gross International Reserves to cover at least 4.0 months of imports of goods and

 

  1. Speaker, available data on the performance of the economy as at end- September 2021 indicate that the implementation of the 2021 budget is largely on track. A summary of this performance is as follows:
  2. GDP data released by the Ghana Statistical Service in September 2021 indicate that Overall Real GDP grew by 3.1 percent in Q1 and 3.9 percent in Q2, averaging 5 percent in the first half of 2021 against the 0.8 percent growth in same period 2020;
  3. Non-Oil Real GDP grew at 4.6 percent in Q1 and 5.2 percent in Q2, averaging 9 percent in the first half year of 2021 compared to 1.2 percent in the same period 2020;
  • End-October 2021 inflation was 0 percent, compared to the 10.1 percent same period in 2020;
  1. Overall budget deficit (cash) of 7 percent of GDP against the target of 7.4 percent of GDP. The budget deficit for same period in 2020 was 8.6 percent of GDP;
  2. Primary balance registered a deficit of 9 percent of GDP, compared to the target deficit of 1.7. The primary balance for same period in 2020 was a deficit of 3.7 percent of GDP;
  3. The Public Debt as percentage of GDP stood at 77.8 percent at the end of September 2021, up from 76.1 percent at the end of December 2020. The elevated public debt ratio reflects the impact of COVID-19 pandemic, Financial Sector clean-up costs, and energy sector IPP payments;
  • The Monetary Policy Rate was maintained at 13.5 percent in the last round of MPC meeting held in October 2021. The 91-day Treasury bill rate, which fell from 1 percent at end-December 2020 to 13.2 percent at the end of

 

September 2021, declined further to 12.5 percent as of 15th November, 2021;

  • Gross International Reserves at end-September 2021 stood at US$10,694.4 million, sufficient to cover 4.9 months of imports, compared to US$8,624.4 million covering 0 months of imports recorded at end-December 2020;
  1. The exchange rates across the major international currencies remained stable for the three quarters of In particular, the Ghana cedi depreciated cumulatively by 1.79 percent against the US Dollar by the end of September 2021 compared to a 2.97 percent depreciation in the same period in 2020.

 

  1. Speaker, I will now provide the details on the performance of the economy in the Real, Fiscal, External, and Monetary sectors.

 

Real Sector Developments
  1. Speaker, provisional GDP data from Ghana Statistical Service published in September 2021, show that the year-on-year Real GDP growth rates for the first and second quarters of 2021 were 3.1 percent and 3.9 percent respectively, compared with 7.0 percent and -5.7 percent in the corresponding periods of 2020. Overall real GDP growth rates for the first half of 2021 averaged 3.5 percent, compared with 0.8 percent for the same period in 2020.

 

  1. GDP, excluding oil, grew by 4.6 percent and 5.2 percent in the first and second quarters, respectively, compared with 9 and -5.8 percent over the same periods in 2020. The average growth of non-oil GDP for the first half of 2021 was 4.8 percent compared with 1.2 percent in 2020 as shown in Figure 1.

 

  1. The pick-up in growth performance largely reflects recovery in economic activities in all sectors of the economy except in the mining and quarrying sub-sector where negative growth rates were recorded in both the first and second quarters of 2021 following the protracted lingering adverse effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the extractive activities.

 

Figure 1: Real GDP Growth (Oil and Non-Oil)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Data source: GSS, 2021 Agriculture

  1. Speaker, the Agriculture Sector recorded an average growth of 4.9 percent in the first half of 2021 compared with 8.1 percent for the same period in 2020. The sector grew by 4.3 percent and 5.6 percent in the first and second quarters respectively, compared with 10.2 percent and 5.6 percent in the corresponding quarters of 2020.

 

  1. The Forestry and logging subsector recorded the highest average growth performance of 5.8 percent in the first half of 2021, representing a significant increase from the average contraction of 1 percent recorded in the corresponding period in 2020.

 

  1. The Crops (including Cocoa) subsector grew by an average of 4.7 percent over the first half of 2021, based on growth performances of 4.9 percent and 4.5 percent in the first and second quarters, respectively. This average growth is a significant slowdown from the 5 percent recorded over the same period in 2020. However, the Cocoa subsector performed strongly, with an average growth of

11.2 percent over the first half of 2021, compared to 0.9 percent in the corresponding period of the previous year.

 

  1. Fishing contracted in the first quarter by 3.6 percent but recovered considerably in the second quarter with a growth of 12.7 percent, resulting in an average growth of 4.6 percent over the first half of 2021. This, however, represents a slowdown compared with the average of 18.1 percent recorded over the same period in 2020, as shown in Table

 

 

 

 

No.

 

 

 

Sector/Subsectors

 

 

 

2014

 

 

 

2015

 

 

 

2016

 

 

 

2017

 

 

 

2018

 

 

 

2019

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2020

H1

Ave

 

 

2021

H1

Ave

1

AGRICULTURE

0.9

2.1

2.7

6.2

4.9

4.7

7.4

8.1

4.9

1.1

Crops

28

1.7

2.2

7.2

5.8

5.3

8.7

9.5

4.7

 

o/w Cocoa

4.3

-8

-7

9.2

3.7

5.4

1.9

0.9

11.2

1.2

Livestock

5.1

5.2

5.4

5.7

5.4

5.4

5.4

5.6

5.6

1.3

Forestry and Logging

-1.5

-3.9

2.9

3.4

2.4

-1.7

-9.2

-8.1

5.8

1.4

Fishing

-23.3

8.5

3.1

-1.4

-6.8

1.7

14.4

18.1

4.6

 

 

Table 4: GDP Growth in the Agriculture Sector and Subsectors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: GSS, September 2021 Industry

  1. Speaker, the Industry sector recorded an average contraction of 1.3 percent in the first Half of 2021, compared with an average contraction of 3.2 percent over the same period in 2020. The sector recorded growth rates of 1.3 percent and -4.3 percent in the first and second quarters, respectively.

 

  1. The Mining and Quarrying subsector contracted by 2 percent and 18.9 percent in the first and second quarters of 2021, respectively, compared to contractions of 8.8 percent and 11.6 percent in the corresponding periods of 2020. The contraction reflects a decline in the production of oil and gas, as well as gold, over the period. Oil and Gas recorded an average growth of -13.4 percent for the first two quarters, compared with -4.2 percent recorded for the same period in 2020.

 

  1. Speaker, the Industry subsector with the highest average growth was Water Supply, Sewerage, Waste Management & Remediation Activities (13.6%), followed by Construction (8.1%), Manufacturing (7.0%), and Electricity (4.8%) as shown in Table 5.

 

Table 5: GDP Growth in the Industry Sector and Subsectors

 

 

No.

 

 

Sector/Subsectors

 

 

2014

 

 

2015

 

 

2016

 

 

2017

 

 

2018

 

 

2019

 

 

2020

 

2020

H1

Ave

 

2021

H1

Ave

2

INDUSTRY

1.1

1.2

4.3

15.6

10.5

6.4

-3.6

-3.2

-1.3

2.1

Mining and Quarrying

5.4

-8.3

-0.2

30.8

23.3

12.6

-11

-10.3

-15.2

 

o/w Oil***

9.3

2

-15.6

80.3

7.9

14.4

-4.6

-4.2

-13.4

2.2

Manufacturing

-2.6

3.7

7.9

9.5

4.1

6.3

1.4

0.7

7.0

2.3

Electricity

1.3

17.7

-5.8

19.4

5.5

6

7.9

16.3

4.8

2.4

Water and Sewerage

5.9

13.9

-11.8

6.1

-3.6

-4.4

2.2

5.3

13.6

2.5

Construction

-0.4

9.5

8.4

5.1

1.1

-4.4

2.9

1.6

8.2

Source: GSS, 2021

 

Services

  1. Speaker, the Services sector, in the first Half of 2021, recorded an average growth rate of 7.2 percent, compared with 2.3 percent in the same period of 2020. The sector recorded growth rates of 4.0 percent and 11.0 percent in the first and second quarters respectively, compared to 12.3 percent and -7.7 percent for the same period in 2020.

 

  1. Speaker, the subsector with the highest growth in the Services sector was Information and Communication (average of 21.0%), followed by Health and Social Work (average of 14.7%), and Real Estate (average of 11.8%). The Hotels and Restaurants subsector, which contracted by an average of 23.9 percent in the first two quarters of 2020, stemming from COVID-19 related restrictions in the period, further contracted by 5.4 percent during the same period in 2021, reflective of an industry that is still struggling to recover from the adverse economic effects of the pandemic.

 

Table 6: GDP Growth in the Services Sector and Subsectors

 

No.

 

Sector/Subsectors

 

2014

 

2015

 

2016

 

2017

 

2018

 

2019

 

2020

2020

H1

Ave

2021

H1

Ave

3

SERVICES

5.2

2.9

2.8

3.4

2.7

7.6

1.5

2.3

7.2

 

3.01

Trade; Repair of Vehicles, Household

Goods

 

2

 

0.5

 

-0.4

 

8.2

 

2.8

 

3.7

 

-1.1

 

0.7

 

5.8

3.02

Hotels and Restaurants

1.5

4.1

2.3

7.6

3.2

6

-34.8

-23.9

-5.4

3.03

Transport and Storage

5.8

2.6

1.1

8.9

1.1

4.3

3.7

2.0

5.2

3.04

Information and communication

29.7

11.9

5.6

4.2

13.1

46.5

22.5

17.2

21.0

3.05

Financial and Insurance Activities

21.4

12.9

8

-17.7

-8.2

1.6

5.5

9.9

5.0

3.06

Real Estate

-0.3

3.1

3.2

3.8

-6.5

19.9

12.5

16.9

11.8

 

3.07

Professional, Administrative & Support Service activities

 

6.8

 

1.4

 

-4.2

 

2.9

 

0.3

 

5.1

 

-5.9

 

-5.0

 

0.0

 

3.08

Public Administration & Defence;

Social Security

 

-3.5

 

-2.6

 

8.9

 

4.2

 

4.3

 

3.7

 

7.3

 

4.3

 

6.2

3.09

Education

-0.3

-0.5

2.3

6.3

3.9

9.4

7.8

5.8

9.2

3.1

Health and Social Work

2.7

-4.4

4

14.1

22.6

10.4

8.2

5.7

14.7

3.11

Other Service Activities

1.4

2.7

-0.1

5.3

3.1

2.6

1.1

1.1

4.9

Source: GSS, 2021

Structure of the Economy in the First Half of 2021

  1. The Services sector remains dominant in terms of sectoral distribution of nominal output, although its relative share over the first half-year has shown a marginal The sector accounted for an average share of 51.9 percent over the first two quarters of 2021, compared with an average of 52.8 percent over the same period in 2020. The average share of the Agriculture Sector increased from 19.1 percent in the first half of 2020 to 21.3 percent for the same period in 2021, while the Industry sector’s share decreased from 28.0 percent in the first half of 2020 to 26.7 percent in the corresponding period in 2021 as shown in Figure 2.

 

Figure 2: GDP Growth in the Services Sector and Subsectors

Data source: GSS, 2021

Monetary Sector Developments
  1. Speaker, monetary policy in 2021 has focused on steering inflation towards the medium-term target band of 8±2 percent, following the surge in inflation at the onset of the COVID-19 Pandemic. Accordingly, the monetary aggregates were projected to increase at a moderate pace during the period, with sufficient accumulation of international reserves to cover at least 4 months of import of goods and services. So far, monetary policy performance in 2021 has been broadly in line with expectations, with significantly stable exchange rate developments, increased reserves accumulation, and generally low inflation.

 

Price Developments
  1. Speaker, earlier this year, between January and May, price developments were characterised by sharp disinflation on the back of well-anchored inflation expectations, exchange rate stability, and favourable food price base drifts carried over from a year ago. Consequently, headline inflation declined sharply from 10.4 percent in December 2020 to 7.5 percent in May 2021. However, inflation picked up to 10.6 percent in September 2021 on account of shocks from domestic fuel price adjustments and increasing domestic food prices arising partly from climate-related factors, input supply bottlenecks, delayed harvests, and world food price increases. Inflation rose further to 11.0 percent in October, driven by non-food inflation mainly on account of price increases in the transport and housing & utility components of the consumer price index (CPI).

 

  1. Underlying inflation pressures broadly tracked the movement in the headline inflation numbers. The Bank of Ghana’s core inflation measure, which excludes energy and utility prices, fell from 9 percent in December 2020 to 7.3 percent

 

in May before rising to 10.0 percent in September 2021, reflecting elevated inflationary pressures in recent months.

 

Monetary Aggregates and Credit Developments
  1. Speaker, developments in the monetary aggregates in September 2021 showed a slower pace of growth in broad money supply (M2+). Growth in M2+ moderated from 27.1 percent (GH¢23,261 million) in September 2020 to 14.2 percent (GH¢15,462 million) in September 2021. The observed moderation was mainly on account of contraction in Net Foreign Assets (NFA) of the depository corporations sector. Net Domestic Assets (NDA), on the other hand, expanded over the same comparative period, albeit, at a moderated pace.

 

  1. In line with the slowdown in money supply growth, developments in banking sector credit also showed sluggish pace of growth, on year-on-year basis, in September The annual growth of outstanding credit slowed to 9.0 percent in September 2021 from 14.4 percent in September 2020, on the back of constrained demand for credit and supply-side risk aversion induced by the COVID-19 pandemic. Total outstanding credit was GH¢50,049 million at the end of September 2021, compared with GH¢45,916 million recorded during the same period in 2020. Similarly, private sector credit growth slowed to 10.5 percent in September 2021 from 12.6 percent in September 2020.

 

Interest Rate Developments
  1. Speaker, the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) of Bank of Ghana reduced the Monetary Policy Rate (MPR) by 100 basis points to 13.50 percent in May 2021 on account of generally favourable inflation expectations, and as an additional measure to support the incipient recovery of activity from the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

  1. Money market rates also broadly declined in line with easing inflation expectations and the cut in the monetary policy rate. The 91-day and 182-day Treasury bill rates declined to 12.47 percent and 13.20 percent, respectively in September 2021, from 02 percent and 14.12 percent, respectively, in September 2020. Similarly, the rate on the 364-day instrument decreased marginally to 16.12 percent from 16.95 percent over the same comparative period. Rates on medium- to long-term instruments also generally declined, except for rates on the 15-year and 20-year bonds which remained unchanged at 19.75 percent and 20.20 percent, respectively during, the period. Rates on the 2-year, 3-year, 5-year, 6-year, 7-year, and 10-year bonds decreased by 75bps, 130bps, 95bps, 70bps, 190bps, and 5bps, respectively, to settle at 17.50 percent,

17.70 percent, 18.30 percent, 18.80 percent, 18.10 percent, and 19.75 percent, respectively, over the review period.

 

  1. The weighted average interbank rate declined to 12.61 percent from 13.58 percent, largely reflecting the cut in the monetary policy rate in May 2021, which transmitted to lending rates. Consequently, average lending rates of banks declined marginally to 20.23 percent in September 2021 from 21.30 percent recorded in the corresponding period of 2020. Similarly, the spread between the average lending rate and the rate on the 3-month time deposits narrowed from

9.80 percent to 8.73 percent over the same comparative period.

 

Outlook for Monetary Sector for end-2021
  1. Speaker, in the outlook, monetary policy will continue to hinge on sustaining price stability with a view to firmly anchor inflation expectations and create conditions conducive to broad-based growth. Inflation is expected to return to the medium-term target band in the near-term, despite the successive upticks in July through October 2021, and remain within the target band over the medium- term. However, continued rise in food prices, upward petroleum price adjustments and their possible second-round effects on the non-food basket, and pass-through effects of exchange rate depreciation, could pose upside risks to the inflation outlook.

 

  1. In line with developments in the year through September 2021, growth of the monetary aggregates is projected to moderate in 2021 and remain stable in the medium-term under the baseline assumption of zero monetary financing by the Bank of Ghana, while private sector credit recovers gradually to pre-pandemic

 

Banking Sector Developments
  1. Speaker, the banking sector remains well-capitalised, liquid, and profitable, backed by strong buffers to support the recovery process. Banks reported a strong balance sheet position as at end-September 2021, albeit with marginal declines in the annual growth rates of some key balance sheet indicators this year compared to the same period last year. Total assets of the banking industry increased by 16.9 percent year-on-year to GH¢170.3 billion as at end-September 2021. This represents a decline in growth from the 22.2 percent in September 2020, attributed to the lingering impact of COVID-19. Year-to-date growth in assets of 14.0 percent in 2021, however, marginally exceeded the corresponding growth of 13.0 percent in 2020, reflecting the gradual rebound in economic activities this year.

 

  1. Speaker, growth in Investments moderated in September 2021, as banks redirected a portion of additional liquidity flows into credit in the third quarter of 2021. Investments in bills and securities grew by 30.0 percent year-on-year to GH¢81.2 billion as at end-September 2021 compared to a growth of 36.6 percent in September 2020. Similarly, year-to-date growth in Investments moderated to

26.1 percent at end of third quarter of 2021 compared to a growth of 29.4 percent

 

in the same corresponding period last year. Investments, however, remained the largest component of banks’ assets with a share of 47.7 percent as at end- September 2021.

 

  1. Speaker, banks reported a gradual rebound in credit growth in September 2021, in line with projections of a net ease in the stance on loans to enterprises and households and an increase in credit demand, as reported during the August 2021 round of credit conditions survey. Gross loans and advances in the year- to-September 2021 increased by 4.8 percent compared to a lower growth of 1.7 percent in the corresponding period last year. The annual growth rate of gross loans and advances, however, declined from 14.4 percent to 9.0 percent during the review period.

 

  1. The industry continued to record strong and sustained growth in deposits attributed to liquidity flows within the domestic economy. Deposits recorded a robust albeit lower growth of 16.4 percent to GH¢113.8 billion as at end- September 2021, relative to the 8 percent growth recorded a year earlier. The COVID-19 fiscal stimulus packages, payments to contractors, SDI depositors, and clients of SEC-licensed fund managers, as well as increased savings by individuals and firms from the pandemic-induced slowdown in consumer and investment spending in some sectors, contributed to the observed growth in total deposits.

 

  1. Speaker, the financial soundness indicators remained healthy in September 2021, reflecting robust solvency, liquidity, and profitability indicators. The industry solvency position remained robust with a CAR of 19.9 percent in September 2020, marginally lower than the CAR of 20.3 percent in September 2020, reflecting the recent gradual rebound in credit. The CAR was, however, well above the regulatory minimum of 11.5 percent, pointing to the ability of banks to further deepen intermediation and shows that banks have adequate buffers to moderate potential losses from such increased lending during the current uncertain operating environment.

 

  1. Speaker, general repayment challenges associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as some bank specific challenges with recoveries on the loan portfolio, contributed to a marginal increase in the NPL ratio from 15.8 percent in September 2020 to 16.8 percent in September 2021. This was attributed to the combined effect of an increase in the stock of NPLs by 16.4 percent to GH¢8.4 billion, as well as a modest growth in the stock of gross loans by 9.0 percent over the period. The adjusted NPL ratio (excluding the fully provisioned loan loss category), however, improved from 6.7 percent to 6.5 percent over the review period.

 

  1. The industry’s profitability performance remained robust but represented a moderation in September 2021 compared with the same period last Profit

 

after tax growth for the first three quarters of the year compared to the same period last year moderated from 22.0 percent to 18.9 percent on account of a moderation in growth of banks’ net interest income from 20.0 percent to 18.2 percent. This was on the back of higher growth in interest expenses during the review period (from 8.1 percent to 15.9 percent), which partially offset the increase in banks’ interest income (from 16.0 percent to 17.5 percent).

 

  1. Speaker, growth in operating expenses was marginally lower at 10.3 percent in September 2021 relative to the 10.4 percent growth a year earlier, reflecting the sustained cost minimisation strategies of banks. Despite the moderation in profit growth, the sector’s profitability indicators improved during the review period, reflecting the moderation in growth in assets and equity. Banks’ Return on Assets (ROA) improved to 4.6 percent from 4.2 percent while Return on Equity (ROE) increased barely marginally to 21.1 percent in September 2021 from 21.0 percent September in August 2020.

 

  1. The assessment indicates that the banking sector remains strong, with key financial indicators pointing to a solvent, liquid, and profitable Banks also continue to hold adequate buffers to moderate any credit and liquidity shocks.

 

  1. Speaker, in summary, the regulatory reforms embarked on during 2017-2019 strengthened the banking sector and cushioned it from the severe effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, the policy support and regulatory reliefs put in place at the height of the pandemic also contributed positively to the sector’s performance. The banking sector, therefore, continues to improve and remains resilient with strong capital buffers to withstand shocks and support the nation’s continued recovery from the shackles of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

External Sector Developments

Trade performance (January – September 2021)

  1. Speaker, Ghana’s export performance for the first nine months of 2021 was shaped by favourable terms of trade for the three main export commodities— gold, cocoa, and crude oil. Total export receipts for the period grew by 2.2 percent on year-on-year basis to US$11,034 million supported by higher prices realised from the three major exports. Price increases of 4.4 percent for gold,

60.4 percent for crude oil, and 3.8 percent for cocoa beans were recorded during the period under review. However, the impact of the higher prices for gold and crude oil on export receipts was moderated by sharp declines in the exported volumes of gold and crude oil by 26.6 and 21.2 percent, respectively. By contrast, the volume of cocoa beans exports during the period increased by 31.9 percent.

 

  1. Merchandise imports for the first nine months of 2021, on the other hand, increased by 9.2 percent to US$10,096 million, mainly due to increased demand for refined petroleum products as economic activity picked Oil imports

 

(including crude, gas, refined petroleum products, and other oil products) increased by 41.6 percent while non-oil merchandise imports bill grew by 3.8 percent.

 

  1. The higher growth in the import bill relative to export receipts resulted in a lower trade surplus of US$926 million compared with a surplus of US$1,556 million in the same period in 2020.

 

Balance of Payments (January – June 2021)

  1. Speaker, the current account deficit for the first half of 2021 was estimated at US$926.1 million (1.3% of GDP) compared with US$548.0 million (0.8% of GDP) for the same period in 2020. This was on the back of the lower trade surplus and higher net investment income outflows. Private individual transfers, however, remained resilient with net inflows of US$1,600.0 million in the first half of the year, despite the uncertain global environment.

 

  1. The capital and financial accounts recorded a net inflow of US$3.3 billion compared with US$1.6 billion for the same period in 2020, driven by higher portfolio and foreign direct investments As a result of these developments, the overall balance of payments recorded a surplus of US$2.4 billion in the first half of 2021, against a surplus of US$1.0 billion in the corresponding period of 2020.

 

International Reserves

  1. Speaker, Gross International Reserves stood at US$10,694.4 million equivalent to 4.9 months of import cover at the end of September 2021, compared with 4.0 months of import cover recorded at the end of December 2020.

 

Exchange Rate Developments

  1. Speaker, the foreign exchange market was relatively stable, and the local currency performed better in 2021 than in 2020. Pressures from corporate demand, energy-related forex demand, and pandemic-induced portfolio outflows were offset by improved forex inflows, mainly from the substantial reserve build- up in 2020, and the 2021 Eurobond issuance. Cumulatively, the Ghana Cedi depreciated against the US Dollar and the Pound Sterling by 1.79 and 0.80 percent, respectively, but appreciated by 3.16 percent against the Euro in September 2021. These compare with depreciation of 2.97, 0.19 and 7.19 percent for the US Dollar, Pound Sterling, and the Euro, respectively, over the same period in 2020.

 

Outlook for External Sector for end-2021
  1. Speaker, the trade account is projected to close the year with a lower surplus on account of lower gold export receipts due to the declining volumes of exports. Moreover, increased economic activity is expected to drive up demand for both non-oil and oil imports, partly contributing to the lower trade balance. These developments in the trade account, coupled with higher interest payments, are expected to widen the current account deficit in 2021 relative to levels recorded in 2020. On the other hand, the capital and financial account is projected to record significant net inflows, sufficient to finance the current account deficit and significantly improve the overall balance of payment outturn.

 

Fiscal Developments
  1. Speaker, the 2021 and medium-term fiscal policy framework was based on Government’s broad macroeconomic objective of restoring and sustaining macroeconomic stability with a focus on fiscal consolidation and debt sustainability over the medium-term. This objective was to be accomplished through deepening of structural reforms to support socio-economic transformation, especially through the implementation of reforms to increase revenue mobilisation and ensure efficiency and effectiveness of public finances.

 

  1. Speaker, as you may recall, the 2021 Mid-Year Fiscal Policy Review of the 2021 Budget revised the fiscal deficit target to 9.4 percent of GDP down from the

9.5 percent set in the 2021 Budget. Similarly, the primary balance target was revised to -2.0 percent of GDP from -1.3 percent. This was on the back of revisions in GDP projections, adjustment in interest payments, and adjustments

 

in the allocation for compensation of employees to reflect the 2021 negotiated public sector wage adjustments.

 

  1. Speaker, preliminary data for the first nine months of the year indicate that, both revenue and expenditure were below their respective targets for the period. However, the short fall in revenue was higher than that of expenditure, resulting in a fiscal deficit of 7.7 percent of GDP against the target of 7.4 percent of GDP as shown in Table 7. This compares favourably to the deficit of 8.6 percent of GDP for the same period in 2020. The corresponding primary balance registered a deficit of 1.9 percent against a targeted deficit of 1.7 percent.

 

Table 7: Summary of Fiscal Performance, January-September, 2021

 

No.

 

Indicators (GH₵ million)

Jan-Sept 2020

2021

Rev. Budget

Jan-Sept 2021

Prov. Outturn

y/y (%)

Prog.

Prov. Outturn

Dev (GH₵)

Dev (%)

y/y (%)

1

Total Revenue & Grants

37,445

1.7

72,477

51,314

47,235

-4,079

-7.9

26.1

 

% of GDP

9.8

 

16.5

11.7

10.8

 

 

 

 

2

Total Exp. (incl. Arrears &

Discrepancy)

 

70,316

 

37.0

 

113,750

 

83,890

 

81,093

 

-2,797

 

-3.3

 

15.3

 

% of GDP

18.3

 

25.9

19.1

18.5

 

 

 

 

3

Overall Fiscal Balance (excl. Finsec Bailout

& IPP Cost)

 

-32,871

 

 

-41,273

 

-32,576

 

-33,858

 

-1,282

 

3.9

 

3.0

 

% of GDP

-8.6

 

-9.4

-7.4

-7.7

 

 

 

 

4

Primary Balance (excl. Finsec Bailout

& IPP Cost)

 

-14,045

 

 

-8,745

 

-7,417

 

-8,464

 

-1,047

 

14.1

 

– 39.7

 

% of GDP

-3.7

 

-2.0

-1.7

-1.9

 

 

 

5

Nominal GDP

383,486

 

439,381

439,381

439,381

 

 

 

Memo Item

 

6

Overall Fiscal Balance (incl. Finsec Bailout &

IPP Cost)

 

-39,935

 

-53,373

 

-43,414

 

-40,775

 

2,639

 

-6.1

 

% of GDP

-10.4

-12.1

-9.9

-9.3

 

 

 

7

Primary Balance (incl. Finsec Bailout & IPP

Cost)

 

-21,109

 

-20,845

 

-18,256

 

-15,381

 

2,875

 

-15.7

 

% of GDP

-5.5

-4.7

-4.2

-3.5

 

 

Source: MoF

Revenue Performance

 

  1. Speaker, Total Revenue and Grants for the first three quarters of 2021 amounted to GH¢47,235 million (10.8% of GDP), against the revised target of GH¢51,314 million (11.7% of GDP) for the period. The end-September outturn, nonetheless, compares favourably with the GH¢37,445 million recorded in the same period in 2020 as indicated in Table 8. The two broad components both contributed to the subpar performance: Grants fell short of the period target by

29.0 percent, while Domestic Revenue underperformed by about 7.4 percent.

 

Table 8: Revenue Performance, January-September, 2021

 

 

 

No.

 

 

Indicators (GH₵

million)

Jan-Sept 2020

 

 

2021

Rev. Budget

Jan-Sept 2021

 

Prov. Outturn

 

y/y (%)

 

 

Prog.

 

Prov. Outturn

 

Dev (GH₵)

 

Dev (%)

 

y/y (%)

 

1

Total Revenue &

Grants

 

37,445

 

1.7

 

72,477

 

51,314

 

47,235

 

4,079

 

-7.9

 

26.1

 

% of GDP

9.8

 

16.5

11.7

10.8

 

 

 

2

Domestic Revenue

36,588

2.0

71,012

50,121

46,388

-3,733

-7.4

26.8

 

 

9.5

 

16.2

11.4

10.6

 

 

 

 

3

Non-oil

Tax Revenue

 

28,595

 

5.2

 

53,632

 

37,856

 

34,889

 

-2,967

 

-7.8

 

22.0

 

% of GDP

7.5

 

12.2

8.6

7.9

 

 

 

 

4

Non-Oil Non-Tax

Revenue

 

3,567

 

-3.6

 

7,078

 

5,199

 

4,260

 

-939

 

-18.1

 

19.4

 

% of GDP

0.9

 

1.6

1.2

1.0

 

 

 

5

Oil and Gas Receipt

2,417

-30.3

5,427

3,619

4,079

460

12.7

68.7

 

% of GDP

0.6

 

1.2

0.8

0.9

 

 

 

6

Other Revenue

2,010

31.1

4,875

3,447

3,160

-287

-8.3

57.2

 

% of GDP

0.5

 

1.1

0.8

0.7

0.1

 

 

7

Grants

857

-6.7

1,465

1,194

847

-346

-29.0

-1.1

 

% of GDP

0.2

 

0.3

0.3

0.2

0.1

 

 

Source: MoF

 

  1. Speaker, Non-Oil Tax Revenue, comprising taxes on Income and Property, Domestic Goods and Services, and International Trade, amounted to GH¢34,889 million (7.9% of GDP) against the revised target of GH¢37,856 million (8.6% of GDP), representing a shortfall of 7.8 percent. The shortfall in Non-Oil Tax Revenue is attributable mainly to the lower than anticipated performance in Corporate Income Tax, Personal Income Tax, Mineral Royalties, Domestic Excise Duty, and Communications Services Tax occasioned largely by the economic scarring from the COVID-19 Pandemic. Specifically:

 

  • Companies’ profits remain low despite the momentum in activity, and this has impacted negatively on withholding tax payments for Corporate Income Tax and lower Personal Income tax. Additionally, field operations by the revenue collecting agencies were also constrained by the impact of the
  • Low production levels and non-achievement of expected rise in gold price; and
  • Lower than anticipated collections from the Communication Service Tax due mainly to relatively lower usage of data as more physical meetings are

 

  1. Speaker, Non-Tax Revenue (excluding oil) amounted to GH¢4,260 million (1.0% of GDP), compared to the revised target of GH¢5,199 million (1.2% of GDP). The lower outturn was largely on account of the lower than expected Internally Generated Fund (IGF) collection by MDAs due to the impact of the pandemic on service delivery.

 

  1. Total upstream oil revenue from January to September 2021 amounted to GH¢4,079 million (0.9% of GDP), against a target of GH¢3,619 million (0.8% of GDP).

 

  1. Other Revenue comprising of the Energy Sector Levies (ESL) and SSNIT Contribution to NHIL altogether amounted to GH¢3,160 million (0.7% of GDP),

8.3 percent below the target of GH¢3,447 million (0.8% of GDP). The ESL include the Sanitation and Pollution Levy and the Energy Sector Recovery Levy (Delta Fund) which were implemented from May this year. The Sanitation and Pollution Levy, however, exceeded target by 16.4 percent.

 

  1. Speaker, disbursements of Grants by Development Partners for the period was mainly from Project Grants and amounted to GH¢847 million (0.2% of GDP), GH¢347 million below the revised target of GH¢1,194 million (0.3% of GDP).

 

Expenditure Performance

  1. Speaker, the execution of expenditures for the period was broadly contained within the Budget’s Appropriation, notwithstanding overages registered in Wages and Salaries, Interest Payment, and Capital Expenditure.

 

  1. Total Expenditures (including arrears clearance and discrepancy) for the period amounted to GH¢81,093 million (18.5% of GDP) against the target of GH¢83,890 million (19.1% of GDP). The end-September provisional outturn was 3 percent above the GH¢70,316 million recorded for the same period 2020 as shown in Table 9.

 

Table 9: Expenditure Performance, January-September, 2021

 

 

No

.

 

 

Indicators (GH₵ million)

Jan-Sept 2020

 

 

2021

Rev. Budget

Jan-Sept 2021

 

Prov. Outturn

 

y/y (%)

 

 

Prog.

 

Prov. Outtur n

 

Dev (GH₵

)

 

Dev (%)

 

y/y (%)

 

1

Total Exp. (incl. Arrears &

Discrepancy)

 

70,316

 

37.0

113,75

0

83,89

0

 

81,093

– 2,797

 

-3.3

 

15.3

 

% of GDP

18.3

 

25.9

19.1

18.5

 

 

 

2

Compensation of Employees

20,448

23.3

31,491

23,32

4

23,394

70

0.3

14.4

 

% of GDP

5.3

 

7.2

5.3

5.3

 

 

 

3

Use of Goods and Services

 

5,579

1.8

8,523

5,504

3,346

– 2,158

– 39.2

-40.0

 

% of GDP

1.5

 

1.9

1.3

0.8

 

 

 

4

Interest Payment

18,826

27.6

32,528

25,15

8

25,394

236

0.9

34.9

 

% of GDP

4.9

 

7.4

5.7

5.8

 

 

 

5

Grants to Other Gov’t Units

9,258

2.3

18,081

12,89

4

11,128

– 1,765

– 13.7

20.2

 

% of GDP

2.4

 

4.1

2.9

2.5

 

 

 

6

Capital Expenditure

8,978

65.1

12,222

8,532

9,074

541

6.3

1.1

 

% of GDP

2.3

 

2.8

1.9

2.1

 

 

 

7

Other Expenditure

8,102

392.

5

7,205

5,448

4,163

– 1,285

– 23.6

-48.6

 

o/w ESLA

1,964.1

 

2,979.5

2,267.

0

2,135.4

-131.6

-5.8

8.7

 

o/w Covid-19 Related

4,856.9

 

3,812.4

2,877.

1

1,891.8

-985.3

-34.2

 

8

Arrears

-1,439

97.8

-3,700

– 3,030

-2,339

691

– 22.8

62.6

 

% of GDP

-0.4

 

-0.8

-0.7

-0.5

 

 

 

9

Discrepancy

2,314

-2.1

0

0

-2,255

– 2,255

 

 

 

% of GDP

0.6

 

0.0

0.0

-0.5

 

 

 

Source: MoF

 

  1. Speaker, expenditure on Compensation of Employees amounted to GH¢23,394 million, 0.3 percent above the revised target of GH¢23,323 million and 14.4 percent above the outturn in the corresponding period 2020.

 

  1. Use of Goods and Services amounted to GH¢3,346 million (0.8% of GDP), 39.2 percent below the revised target of GH¢5,504 million. The outturn on a year-to- year basis, represents a decrease of about 0 percent over the 2020 outturn.

 

This is in line with the use of the quarterly allotment system to constrain discretionary expenditures to match revenue inflows.

 

  1. Speaker, Capital Expenditure (CAPEX) amounted to GH¢9,074 million (2.1% of GDP) compared with the revised target of GH¢8,532 million (1.9% of GDP), reflecting an overrun of 6.3 percent. The higher than programmed performance is due to the higher Foreign financed CAPEX driven mainly by the faster disbursement of Project Loans. Domestically financed CAPEX was contained within target and was below it by 17.4 percent.

 

  1. Speaker, Interest Payment, was marginally above the target for the period by 0.9 percent, totalling GH¢25,394 million against a revised target of GH¢25,158 million. Of this amount, domestic interest payment amounted to GH¢20,576 million, 4.9 percent higher than the revised target, while external interest payment of GH¢4,818 million was below the programme for the period by 13.2 percent.

 

  1. Grants to Other Government Units amounted to GH¢11,128 million, 7 percent below the revised target of GH¢12,894 million. The shortfall emanates from the lower-than-programmed revenue outturn of the tax handles linked to the various grants.

 

  1. Speaker, Other Expenditure comprising mainly Energy Sector Levies (ESL) transfers and COVID-19-related expenditures amounted to GH¢4,163 million,

23.6 percent below the programmed target of GH¢5,448 million. Of this amount, COVID-19-related expenditures accounted for GH¢1,892 million. However, COVID-19 vaccines procured through a loan of GH¢753.8 million are reported as part of Foreign financed CAPEX. This brings total COVID-19 related expenditures to GH¢2,646 million against the target of GH¢2,877 million.

 

  1. Arrears clearance for the period amounted to GH¢2,339 million, 22.8 percent below the revised target of GH¢3,030 million for the period, as shown in Table

 

Overall Budget Balance and Financing Operations

  1. Speaker, as shown in Table 10, Government’s fiscal operations resulted in a cash deficit of GH¢33,858 million (7.7% of GDP), compared to the revised target of GH¢32,576 million (7.4% of GDP). The corresponding Primary Balance was a deficit of GH¢8,464 million (1.9% of GDP) against the target deficit of GH¢7,417 million (1.7% of GDP).

 

  1. Speaker, the deficit was financed from both domestic and external sources. Total Domestic Financing amounted to GH¢20,388 million (4.6% of GDP), constituting 60.2 percent of the total financing, against the target of GH¢14,061

 

million. Total Domestic Financing included drawdowns in Government deposits at the Central Bank, domestic bond market operations, and other sources of domestic financing. On the other hand, Foreign Financing amounted to GH¢13,470 million, against the target of GH¢18,514 million. The foreign financing for the period includes the 2021 Eurobond issued earlier this year. Table 10 gives summary of financing of Government’s fiscal operations.

 

  1. Speaker, you recall that in 2020, approval was given for Government to use an amount of GH¢1,204 million in the Contigency Fund from the excess over Ghana Stabilisation Fund after lowering the cap on the Stabilisation Fund from US$300 million to US$100 million to fund the Coronavirus Alleviation Programme. Mr. Speaker, in line with Section 23 (4) of the Petroleum Revenue Management Act (PRMA), Government is happy to inform you that, as at the end of October 2021, Government has repleninshed the Contigency Fund with an amount of GH¢660 million. Government opted to use transfers of the excess over the cap from the Ghana Stabilisation Fund to replenish the Contingency Fund.

 

Table 10: Financing, January-September

 

 

 

No.

 

 

Indicators (GH₵

million)

Jan-Sept 2020

 

 

2021

Rev. Budget

Jan-Sept 2021

 

Prov. Outturn

 

 

Prog.

 

Prov. Outturn

 

Dev (GH₵)

 

Dev (%)

 

y/y (%)

1

Total Financing

32,871

41,273

32,576

33,858

1,282

3.9

3.0

 

% of GDP

8.6

9.4

7.4

7.7

 

 

 

2

Foreign Financing

1,816

15,874

18,514

13,470

-5,044

-27.2

641.6

 

% of GDP

0.5

3.6

4.2

3.1

 

 

 

3

Domestic Financing

31,054

25,399

14,061

20,388

6,326

45.0

-34.3

 

% of GDP

8.1

5.8

3.2

4.6

 

 

 

4

Primary Balance

-14,045

-8,745

-7,417

-8,464

-1,047

14.1

-39.7

 

% of GDP

-3.7

-2.0

-1.7

-1.9

 

 

 

5

Nominal GDP

383,486

439,381

439,381

439,381

 

 

 

Source: MoF

 

Outlook for End-year 2021
  1. Speaker, based on the provisional fiscal outturn for January-September, 2021 presented above, projected fiscal outturns for the full 2021 year are as follows:
  2. Total Revenue and Grants of GH¢70,347 million (16.0% of GDP), 9 percent lower than the revised target for the year. The Ghana Revenue

 

Authority (GRA) is, however, stepping up its revenue mobilisation efforts to achieve the GH¢57,055 million tax revenue target as originally envisioned in the 2021 Mid-Year Review of Fiscal Policy. Preliminary data in October indicates a significant narrowing of the cumulative shortfall in Non-Oil Tax Revenue;

  1. Total Expenditure (including arrears clearance) of GH¢111,645 million (25.3% of GDP), 9 percent lower than the revised target; and
  • A resulting fiscal deficit of GH¢41,297 million (9.4% of GDP). The corresponding Primary Balance is projected at a deficit of GH¢8,769 million (2.0% of GDP) as shown in Figure 3

 

  1. Speaker, Government remains fully committed to achieving the fiscal deficit target of 9.4 percent of GDP to drive a faster pace of consolidation that will ensure that the objective of returning to the Fiscal Responsibility Act (FRA) threshold of a deficit not exceeding 5 percent of GDP and positive primary balance by 2024 is achieved.

 

Figure 3: Fiscal Outlook for 2021

Source: MoF

Public Debt Developments for 2021
  1. Speaker, the COVID-19 pandemic continues to exert a toll on the global economy. The cyclical fiscal adjustments effected to save lives and livelihood, although well-intentioned, have had some negative effects on global debt developments. According to the IMF’s October 2021 Fiscal Monitor report, global public debt as a ratio of GDP is expected to decline only slightly from the 98.6 percent of GDP recorded in 2020 to 97.8 percent of GDP in 2021.

 

  1. Speaker, coming back home, the provisional nominal debt stock, including financial sector bailout costs and energy sector IPPs payments, stood at

 

GH¢341,762.7 million (US$58,239.8 million) as at end-September 2021, from end-December 2020 stock of GH¢291,630.7 million (US$50,832.4 million). Expressed as ratios of nominal GDP, the end-September 2021 debt stock was

77.8 percent when the cost of the financial sector bailouts and energy sector IPP payments are included, but 72.0 percent when they are excluded.

 

  1. Speaker, the elevation in the debt stock in 2021 arising from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic seemed to be stabilising as at end-September 2021. Without any further large issuances expected to take place before the end of the year, we expect a tapering of the debt dynamics.

 

  1. The composition of public debt comprises external debt of GH¢163,652.2 million (US$27,888.0 million) and domestic debt of GH¢178,110.5 million (US$30,351.8 million) as shown in Figure This represents a foreign-domestic share split of

47.9 percent and 52.1 percent, respectively.

 

 
   


Figure 4: Public Debt Stock (in GH¢ Billion)

Source: MoF

 

2021 International Capital Funding Programme

  1. Speaker, this Honourable House granted approval for Government to raise US$3,000.0 million from the International Capital Market (ICM), with the option to increase the amount to US$5,000.0 million based on favourable market conditions. The various options for raising the said amount included Eurobonds, sustainable bonds, diaspora bonds, and/or syndicated loans.

 

  1. Speaker, in line with this, Government issued a 4-tranche Eurobond with a face value of US$3,025.0 million in March 2021 on the ICM. Significant in the issuance was the innovative zero-coupon bond, which is a market response to

 

the creation of a medium-term fiscal space, while Government revitalises the economy through the Ghana CARES ‘Obaatanpa’ Programme (See Table 11 for details of the transaction).

 

Table 11: Transaction Details

Bond Type

Zero Coupon

Conventional (Coupon Paying)

Maturity Date

25-Apr

29-Apr

Apr-34

May-42

Issue Size

US$525m

US$1,000m

US$1,000m

US$500m

Weighted Average Life

(Yrs.)

 

4 years

 

7 years

 

12 years

 

20 years

Coupon (%)

Zero

7.75%

8.63%

8.88%

Repayment

Bullet

3 Equal Instalments in Final 3 Years

Order Book

Peak Orders in excess of US$6,000m

Subscription

~2x

Source: MoF

 

  1. Speaker, Government, through the 2021 Eurobond programme, bought back US$117.3 million of the 2023 maturing Eurobonds and used an amount of US$1,300.0 million for domestic and external liability management operations. The remaining Eurobonds proceeds were used to support the implementation of the 2021 Budget.

 

  1. Speaker, the success of this historic Eurobond transaction reflects Ghana’s ability to raise multi-billion-dollar financing. It is also a testament to Ghana’s hard- won credibility with investors, underpinned by solid growth prospects and disciplined fiscal consolidation efforts since 2017. In addition, the transaction marks the first and largest sub-Saharan African Sovereign USD bond issuance since the onset of COVID-19 pandemic, and enhances the nation’s market access through the pioneering, innovative use of a zero-coupon tranche.

 

Sustainable Financing Framework under the ICM Programme

  1. Speaker, barely 9 years to the Agenda 2030 deadline, Government, in spite of the progress made with the Sustainable Development Goals, is keenly reminded of how much more is left to be done and the magnitude of resources required to enable us to attain the Sustainable Development Goals holistically.

 

  1. Speaker, to accelerate and guide the process, Government has developed a Sustainable Financing Framework (SFF) to provide the appropriate vehicle for the country to incorporate sovereign Sustainable Financing instruments into its capital markets borrowing programme.

 

  1. Speaker, the Sustainable Financing Framework and the Second Party Opinion, which reflects an independent opinion on the alignment of the Framework with current market standards, have been published on the Ministry of Finance website and we encourage our international and local private sector partners to review and engage Government on it as we navigate the decade of action and crank up our national efforts to accelerate climate change mitigation, and adaptation.

 

  1. Speaker, another objective is to diversify Ghana’s investor base and financing sources. In this vein, Government would like to take this opportunity to affirm its commitment to the tenets and principles of ESG financing.

 

Developments in Credit Rating Actions for 2021

  1. Speaker, the global episode of credit stress brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic and its attendant rating downgrades persisted in 2021, albeit at a subdued pace, on account to increased measures to combat the impact of the pandemic. This is again partly explained by the steady rollout of COVID-19 vaccines worldwide, although with significant disparities among countries.

 

  1. Speaker, Ghana’s ratings remained relatively stable in 2021 mainly due to the robust measures initiated by Government in 2020 to address the COVID situation—including a credible fiscal consolidation plan and a steady progress in vaccine rollout which have resulted in a quicker pace of economic rebound.

 

  1. Speaker, for 2021, three (3) rating actions have so far been conducted on Ghana. On 22nd June, 2021, Fitch Ratings revised Ghana’s Long-Term Foreign- Currency Issuer Default Rating (IDR) outlook to negative from stable and affirmed the IDR at “B”. In September 2021, Moody’s and S&P affirmed Ghana’s ratings at B3 and B-, respectively, and also maintained Ghana’s outlook at negative and stable, respectively.

 

  1. As summarised in Table 12, Ghana is currently rated B3 with a negative outlook by Moody’s, B- with a stable outlook by S&P, and B with a negative outlook by

 

Table 12: Ghana’s Current Credit Ratings

Rating Agency

Rating Outcome

Outlook

Rating Action

 

Moody’s

 

B3

 

Negative

Ghana’s long-term issue & senior

unsecured bond ratings maintained at B3 & outlook at negative

 

S&P

 

B-

 

Stable

Ghana’s long-term foreign & local currency sovereign credit ratings maintained at B- with stable outlook

 

 

 

Fitch

 

B

 

Negative

Ghana’s Long-Term Foreign-Currency IDR at B with negative outlook

Source: MoF

 

Ghana Stock Exchange Performance for 2021

Equity Market Performance in 2021

  1. Speaker, as shown in Figure 5, the Ghana Stock Exchange’s equities market main indices—GSE Composite Index (GSE-CI) and the Financial Stock Index (GSE-FSI) — rallied strongly to close the period with a year-to-date gain of 47 percent and 15 percent, respectively, as at end-September 2021. The GSE-CI is on track to record one of its best years in the Exchange’s history. For the review period, the GSE was also recognised as the best performing market in Africa.

 

  1. Despite the uncertainty surrounding the global capital markets, the GSE continued its run of impressive performance from last year through this year to record 400 million and GH¢411 million in volume and value traded,

 

  1. The outstanding performance of the index was because of price appreciation across the breadth of the market. These included FML (198%), SOGEGH (95%), MTNGH (94%), GGBL (83%), TOTAL (64%), EGL (64%), BOPP (43%), GCB (33%), SCB (25%), GOIL (13%), and CAL (7 %), among

 

  1. The participation of domestic investors has also increased to 32 percent from 16 percent recorded in 2020. However, foreign investors continued to dominate trading on the market, accounting for 68 percent and 74 percent of value and volume traded,

 

 
   


Figure 5: Ghana Stock Exchange Equity Market

Source: MoF

 

 

Ghana Fixed Income Market Performance for 2021
  1. The year 2021 has been an excellent one for the Ghana Fixed Income Market (GFIM). The market is likely to double the 2020 traded value of GHȼ108.4 As at the end of September 2021, the market has traded GHȼ155 billion, which is already 43 percent more than the 2020 total annual value traded, giving a cumulative total traded value of GHȼ409.5 billion since inception of the market in 2015.

 

  1. Out of the GHȼ155 billion traded, GHȼ17.2 billion were trades done on the corporate bonds market, which represented 11 percent of the total trades. The end-September 2021 performance was a 1.9 percent improvement over the corporate debts traded in the same period in 2020.

 

  1. As at end-September 2021, liquidity on the market has increased by 0 percent compared to 63.6 percent during same period last year. Figure 6 below illustrates the performance of the market since its inception in August 2015 to September 2021.

 

 
   


Figure 6: Volume Traded on the GFIM (Million)

Source: MoF

 

  1. In the latest publication of the Absa Africa Financial Market Index 2021, Ghana ranked 4th out of the 23 ranked financial markets. This indicates that the market is geared to grow and develop amidst the competition from the other markets in the sub-region.

 

  1. The Absa Africa Financial Markets Index assesses countries based on six pillars: market depth; access to foreign exchange; market transparency, tax, and regulatory environment; capacity of local investors; macroeconomic opportunity; and enforceability of financial These are areas where Ghana is

 

performing admirably and has been internationally recognised as a haven for investment as a result.

 

Petroleum Receipts and Utilisation in 2021
  1. Speaker, total crude oil production for January to September 2021 was 41.53 million barrels. Greater Jubilee output was 19.94 million barrels, Tweneboa- Enyenra-Ntomme (TEN) was 9.48 million barrels, and Sankofa-Gye Nyame (SGN) was 12.12 million barrels, representing 48.0 percent, 22.8 percent, and 29.2 percent of the total output, respectively, as shown in Table 13.

 

Table 13: Total Crude Oil Production (Jan-Sept 2021) in Barrels

No.

Month

Jubilee Production

TEN

Production

SGN

Production

Total Production

1

Jan-21

2,255,226

1,226,811

1,500,247

4,982,284

2

Feb-21

1,975,758

1,070,128

1,315,371

4,361,257

3

Mar-21

2,102,802

1,199,090

1,399,778

4,701,670

4

Apr-21

2,155,621

1,093,932

1,382,376

4,631,929

5

May-21

2,182,699

1,121,622

1,402,449

4,706,770

6

Jun-21

2,109,221

972,682

1,302,046

4,383,949

7

Jul-21

2,379,739

967,207

1,284,008

4,630,954

8

Aug-21

2,389,790

949,750

1,314,393

4,653,933

9

Sep-21

2,389,622

875,267

1,214,873

4,479,762

 

Total

19,940,478

9,476,489

12,115,541

41,532,508

Source: GNPC
  1. The Q1-Q3 2021 crude oil production of 41.53 million is 19.2 percent lower than the production of 43 million barrels for the same period in 2020. The reduction in crude oil production is because of the adverse impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on upstream operations in 2020 which caused the Greater Jubilee and TEN Fields approved work programme for 2020 to be deferred to 2021.

 

  1. Speaker, out of the total crude oil production achieved for January to September 2021 of 41.53 million barrels, 7.59 million barrels, made up of 3.84 million barrels from the Jubilee field, 1.89 million barrels from TEN field and 1.85 million barrels from SGN field were lifted by the Ghana National Petroleum Corporation (GNPC) on behalf of the State.

 

Petroleum Receipts for Jan-Sept 2021

  1. Speaker, total receipts from crude oil liftings by GNPC for January-September 2021 was US$496.88 million (GH₵2,867.28 million), comprising the 58th – 61st Jubilee liftings, 18th -19th TEN liftings, and the 7th – 8th liftings from the Sankofa Gye-Nyame field, as shown in Table 14.

 

Table 14: Petroleum Receipts from Jan-Sept 2021 Liftings

 

 

No.

Item

Unit

Jubilee Liftings

TEN

Liftings

SGN

Liftings

TOTAL

Liftimgs

1

Volume of lift

barrels

3,844,097

1,892,070

1,853,127

7,589,294

2

Selling Price

US$

62.56

67.98

69

66.442

 

3

Pricing Option Fees

 

US$

 

0.0725

 

0.05

 

 

0.06

4a

Value of Lift

US$

240,847,990

128,723,697

127,304,415

496,876,102

4b

GH¢

1,388,099,928

743,777,632

735,404,643

2,867,282,203

Source: GNPC
  1. A total of 77,196.45 MMscf of gas was delivered for power generation and non- power gas users between January and September 2021, of which 48,143.47 MMScf was from SGN Field, 26,548.81 MMScf from Greater Jubilee Field and 2,504.17 MMScf from TEN This translates to an average daily gas export of

282.77 MMScf compared to the annualised daily target of 278.04 MMScf which is

1.70 percent above target. GNPC transported a total of 26,548.81 MMscf of gas from the Jubilee field to the Ghana National Gas Company Atuabo Gas Processing Plant for power generation. An additional 48,143.47 MMScf of gas was transported from the SGN Field to power producers via the Onshore Receiving Facility (ORF) for power generation as well.

 

  1. Total petroleum receipts (i.e. proceeds from liftings and other petroleum receipts) for January to September, 2021, was US$618.46 million (GH¢3,627.47 million), as shown in Table 15. This compares with the receipts of US$387 million (GH¢2,151.58 million) for the same period in 2020.

 

Table 15: Petroleum Receipts from all Sources (Jan-Sept 2021)

 

No.

 

ITEM

 

UNIT

 

JUBILEE

 

TEN

 

SGN

OTHER RECEIPTS

 

TOTAL

1

Royalties

US$

67,055,728

33,434,726

65,699,704

166,190,159

 

2

Carried and

Participating Interest

 

US$

 

173,792,262

 

95,288,970

 

61,604,710

 

 

330,685,943

3

Corporate Income Tax

US$

120,741,337

120,741,337

4

Surface Rentals

US$

826,816

826,816

5

PHF Income

US$

19,217

19,217

 

Total Petroleum

Receipts

US$

240,847,990

128,723,697

127,304,415

121,587,370

618,463,472

GH¢

1,412,645,717

755,003,099

746,678,585

713,146,401

3,627,473,801

Source: MoF & BoG

 

  1. Speaker, actual petroleum receipts for the first nine months of 2021 was US$618.46 million as shown in Table 16. This is higher than the realised receipts of US$387 million for the same period in 2020 by US$231.46 million. The surge

 

in receipts was mainly because of a higher average achieved crude oil price of US$65.47, compared to US$44.19 for the same period in 2020.

 

  1. The Carried and Participating Interest contributed the highest (53.5%) to total petroleum receipts for the period, followed by Royalties (26.9%), and Corporate Income Tax (19.5%) as shown in Figure 7. The rest including Surface Rental contributed only 13 percent to petroleum receipts for the period.

 

  1. Speaker, there were no receipts from gas royalties for the period under review.

Figure 7: Petroleum Receipts from all Sources (Jan-Sept 2021)

Source: MoF & BoG

 

Table 16: Analysis of Petroleum Receipts (US$Mn)

 

Item

 

Unit

 

2018

 

2019

 

2020

 

2021

Deviation (2021 &

2020)

 

 

Jan-Sep

Jan-Sep

Jan-Sep

Jan-Sep

Jan-Sep

Royalties

US$Mn

208.66

187.65

78.99

166.19

87.21

Jubilee

US$Mn

75.91

70.32

41.00

67.06

26.06

TEN

US$Mn

69.72

47.33

37.99

33.43

-4.56

SGN

US$Mn

63.03

70.00

0.00

65.70

65.70

Carried and Participating Interest

US$Mn

395.43

317.15

214.52

330.69

116.16

Jubilee

US$Mn

196.74

182.26

106.25

173.79

67.54

TEN

US$Mn

198.69

134.89

108.27

95.29

-12.98

SGN

US$Mn

0.00

0.00

0.00

61.60

61.60

Surface Rentals

US$Mn

0.70

0.66

0.69

0.83

0.13

Corporate Income Tax

US$Mn

117.61

161.25

92.28

120.74

28.46

PHF income

US$Mn

1.15

1.70

0.34

0.02

-0.32

Gas Royalties

US$Mn

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

Gas Carried and Participating Interest

US$Mn

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

Interest on Late Payment on TEN

US$Mn

0.00

0.00

0.18

0.00

-0.18

Total Petroleum Receipts

US$Mn

723.55

668.41

387.00

618.46

231.46

GH¢Mn

4,022.69

3,716.15

2,151.58

3,627.47

1,475.89

Source: MoF

 

Petroleum Distribution for Jan-Sept 2021

  1. Speaker, Section 4 of the PRMA (Amendment), 2015 (Act 893) requires that not more than 70 percent of the Benchmark Revenue shall be paid into the Annual Budget Funding Amount (ABFA) and not less than 30 percent shall be paid into the Ghana Petroleum Funds (GPFs). Out of the amount transferred into the GPFs, the Ghana Heritage Fund (GHF) receives not less than 30 percent, with the rest transferred into the Ghana Stabilisation Fund (GSF).

 

  1. Speaker, the 2021 (January-September) petroleum receipts were distributed based on the provisions of the PRMA (as amended). Out of the total petroleum receipts of US$618.46 million for the period under review, US$590.82 million was distributed to the allowable designated accounts in line with the provisions of the PRMA.

 

  1. Of the amount of US$590.83 million distributed, the National Oil Company (GNPC) was allocated a total of US$161.51 million, made up of Equity Financing Cost of US$110.03 million and GNPC’s share of the net Carried and Participating Interest of US$51.48 million as shown in Table 17.

 

Table 17: Distribution of Petroleum Receipts Jan-Sept, 2021

 

No

 

Item

 

Unit

 

Jubilee

 

TEN

 

SGN

 

TOTAL

1

Transfer to GNPC

US$ Mn

73.97

58.77

28.77

161.51

1.1

o/w Equity Financing cost

US$ Mn

52.21

43.11

14.70

110.03

 

1..2

o/w Net Carried and Participation

Interest

 

US$ Mn

 

21.76

 

15.65

 

14.07

 

51.48

2

GoG Net Receipts for Distribution to ABFA and GPFs

US$ Mn

140.32

144.45

144.53

429.31

2.1

ABFA

US$ Mn

98.23

101.12

61.29

260.64

2.2

GPFs

US$ Mn

42.10

43.34

83.24

168.67

2.2.1

o/w GSF

US$ Mn

29.47

30.33

58.27

118.07

2.2.2

o/w GHF

US$ Mn

12.63

13.00

24.97

50.60

 

3

 

Total Payments

US$ Mn

214.29

203.23

173.30

590.83

GH¢ Mn

1,256.89

1,191.99

1,016.48

3,465.35

Source: MoF

 

  1. The ABFA received a total of US$260.64 million to support the Budget, while the GPFs received US$168.67 million, which were distributed in the ratio of 7:3 in line

 

with the PRMA, with the GSF receiving US$118.07 million and the GHF US$50.60 million.

 

ABFA Allocation and Utilisation

  1. The ABFA allocations were made in line with Section 21(4) of the PRMA, which requires that at least 70.0 percent of ABFA is used to fund public investment Consequently, of the total allocation of GH¢1,528.72 million (US$260.64 million), GH¢1,070.10 million (US$182.45 million) was earmarked for Capex and GH¢458.61 million (US$78.19 million) for Goods and Services.

 

  1. Speaker, in terms of actual utilisation, an amount of GH¢1,420.04 million, representing 92.89 percent of the end-September 2021 allocation of GH¢1,528.72 million and 54.9 percent of the annual 2021 ABFA Budget provision of GH¢2,585.10 million, was utilised at the end of September 2021.

 

  1. Table 18 provides a summary of utilisation by the priority areas. Details of the projects that benefitted from the ABFA allocation for the period under review can be found in the Appendix 9 of the Annual Report on the Petroleum Funds for

 

Table 18: ABFA Utilization by Priority Area for Jan-Sep 2021 in GH¢ Mn)

 

No.

 

Priority Area

 

2021 Budget GH¢Mn

 

Actual Utilisation GH¢Mn

 

% of Budget utilised

1

Agriculture

10

2.93

29.3%

2

Education and Health Service Delivery

808.61

412.76

51.0%

3

Roads, Rail and Other Critical Infrastructure

1,385.00

828.64

59.8%

4

Industrial Development

17.21

13.48

78.3%

 

Sub-Total

2,220.82

1,257.82

56.6%

5

Ministry of Finance

364.28

162.22

44.5%

 

o/w PIAC

2.37

2

84.4%

 

o/w GIIF

361.91

160.22

44.3%

6

Total

2,585.10

1,420.04

54.9%

Source: MoF

 

SECTION FOUR: MEDIUM-TERM OBJECTIVES AND TARGETS

Government’s Medium-Term Vision and Objectives
  1. Speaker, Ghana is yet to fully recover from the economic scarring effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. The economic and social fallouts from the pandemic have been severe, impacting lives and livelihoods through the loss of lives, global supply-chain disruptions, job losses, inflationary pressures, revenue loss to Government, rising Government expenditures to improve health systems and accommodate other virus containment measures, and worsening levels of public debt, among others.

 

  1. Speaker, the African Development Bank (AfDB) estimates that more than 30 million Africans fell into extreme poverty in 2020 and nearly 39 million are likely to do so in 2021. These are the stark realities that we must contend with and deal with decisively as policy makers.

 

  1. Speaker, with almost a decade of significant economic progress wiped away from the pandemic’s scarring, countries are left with no other choice but to navigate through these unchartered territories for a few more years.

 

  1. Speaker, Government is very much aware of its mandatory obligation under Article 36(1) of the 1992 Constitution to take all necessary action to ensure that the national economy is managed in such a manner as to:
  2. maximize the rate of economic development;
  3. secure the maximum welfare, freedom, and happiness of every person in Ghana; and
  • provide adequate means of livelihood and suitable employment and public assistance to the

 

  1. Speaker, to fulfil this crucial mandate, Government has drafted a new Medium-Term National Development Policy Framework, 2022-2025 as a successor to the current Medium-Term National Development Policy Framework (MTNDPF) — An Agenda for Jobs: Creating Prosperity and Equal Opportunity for All (2018-2021) — to provide the overall framework for medium-term economic recovery and transformation of the country.

 

  1. Speaker, more specifically, Government prepared the GhanaCARES Programme as a direct response to COVID-19 pandemic to revitalise and transform the economy to enable us “build forward better”. Government will continue to support the productive sectors of the economy as well as the vulnerable through the implementation of the GhanaCARES (Obaatanpa) Programme, Government’s key flagship interventions, and targeted social

 

intervention programmes. The protection of lives and livelihood is still of the highest priority, even as we recover from the pandemic.

 

  1. Speaker, the medium-term development objectives are to:
  2. Build a prosperous country;
  3. Create opportunities for all Ghanaians;
  • Safeguard the natural environment, including addressing climate change issues and ensure a resilient built environment;
  1. Maintain a stable, united, and safe country;
  2. Build back a resilient and robust country with strengthened adaptive capacity for withstanding national and global threats of different dimensions (including COVID-19); and
  3. Improve delivery of development outcomes at all

 

  1. Government’s medium-term   revitalisation  and   transformation  agenda                      will continue to be supported by:
  2. a strong agricultural modernisation agenda;
  3. industrialisation & manufacturing programme;
  • the AfCFTA programme;
  1. an aggressive FDI promotion drive;
  2. a strong digitalisation drive for more efficient and effective service delivery and formalisation of the economy; and
  3. the promotion of Ghana as a regional hub for financial services, automotive industry, manufacturing, petrochemical industry, and

 

  1. Speaker, the broad macroeconomic goals to support the medium-term objectives include:
  2. Restoration and sustainability of macroeconomic stability with a focus on fiscal and debt sustainability;
  3. Maintaining a good balance between the implementation of the revitalisation and transformation programme and fiscal consolidation to promote growth within a stable macroeconomic environment;
  • Providing a supportive private sector environment (including promoting entrepreneurship) for domestic businesses and for FDI to thrive;
  1. Building a robust financial sector to support growth and development; and
  2. Deepening structural reforms to make the machinery of Government work more efficiently and effectively to support socio-economic In particular, implement reforms to increase revenue mobilization and the efficiency of public expenditures.

 

  1. Speaker, the following areas will be prioritised in 2022:
  2. COVID-19 containment and vaccination to protect lives and livelihoods and attain herd immunity;

 

  1. Fiscal consolidation to promote fiscal and debt sustainability. Key planks include reduced borrowing, increased domestic revenue mobilisation, rationalising expenditures, and enforcing commitment control;
  • Continued revitalisation and transformation of the economy to ‘build forward better” through the GhanaCARES Programme, Government Flagship programmes, and the Agenda111;
  1. Youth development and empowerment, and Job Creation Agenda;
  2. Building an entrepreneurial state;
  3. National Security (both domestic and regional); and
  • Social Interventions Programmes (Housing, Training & Retraining, LEAP, NAELP).

 

2022 and Medium-Term Overall Macroeconomic Targets
  1. Speaker, guided by the medium-term policy objectives, the following macroeconomic targets are set for the medium-term (2022-2025):
  2. Overall Real GDP to growth at an average rate of 6 percent;
  3. Non-Oil Real GDP to grow at an average rate of 9 percent;
  • End-December Inflation to be within the target band of 8±2 percent;
  1. Primary Balance to return to the Fiscal Responsibility Act threshold target by 2022 – i.e. a positive primary balance
  2. Overall fiscal balance to return to the Fiscal Responsibility Act threshold target by 2024—i.e. fiscal deficit of not more than 5 percent of GDP; and
  3. Gross International Reserves to cover at least 4 months of

 

  1. Speaker, based on the overall macroeconomic objectives and the medium- term targets, the following macroeconomic targets are set for the 2022 fiscal year:
  2. Overall Real GDP growth of 8 percent;
  3. Non-Oil Real GDP growth of 9 percent;
  • End-December inflation rate of 8 percent;
  1. Fiscal deficit of 4 percent of GDP;
  2. Primary surplus of 1 percent of GDP; and
  3. Gross International Reserves to cover not less than 4 months of

 

  1. Speaker, I will now provide the detailed outlook in the Real, Fiscal, External and Monetary Sectors of the economy.

 

2022 and Medium-Term Real Sector Outlook Overall GDP Growth
  1. Speaker, overall Real GDP is estimated to grow at 4.4 percent in 2021. Over the medium-term covering the period 2022-2025, Real GDP is projected to grow at an average of 5.6 percent—with yearly growth rates of 5.8 percent, 5.4 percent, 5.3 percent, and 6.0 percent in 2022, 2023, 2024, and 2025, respectively.

 

 

  1. Speaker, Real GDP (excluding the oil and gas sector) is estimated to grow at

5.9 percent in 2021, and also projected to grow at an average of 5.9 percent over the medium-term—with yearly growth rates of 5.9 percent, 5.7 percent, 5.8 percent, and 6.1 percent in 2022, 2023, 2024, and 2025, respectively. The projected overall and non-oil Real GDP growth rates are shown in Table 19.

 

Table 19; Oil and Non-Oil GDP Growth Projection in Ghana, 2021-2025 (Percent)

No.

Item

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

1

Real GDP

4.4

5.8

5.4

5.3

6.0

2

Non-Oil GDP

5.9

5.9

5.7

5.8

6.1

Source: MoF, 2021

 

Sectoral GDP Growth

Agriculture

  1. Speaker, the Agriculture sector is expected to grow at 5.3 percent in 2021 and maintain the same growth rate in 2022. Over the medium-term, the sector growth is expected to stabilise at 5.5 percent from 2023 to 2025. The sector’s growth is expected to be mainly driven by supportive interventions in the Crops and Fishing sub-sectors, boosted by the “Planting for Food & Jobs” Programme.

 

Industry

  1. Speaker, the Industry sector is expected to contract by 0.5 percent in 2021, based on sharp declines in petroleum and gold production. The seemingly negative growth in gold production largely emanates from the use of gold exports to proxy gold production due to lack of data on gold production. The Sector, however, is expected to recover sharply with a growth of 6.3 percent in 2022. The recovery is expected to be sustained and robust with an average medium- term growth of 5.9 percent, based on yearly performances of 5.6 percent, 5.0 percent, and 7.1 percent in 2023, 2024, and 2025, respectively.

 

  1. An anticipated recovery in the Mining and Quarrying subsector, which includes petroleum, is expected to significantly contribute to the overall recovery of The sub-sector is expected to record an improved growth performance of 6.5 percent in 2022, from the expected contraction of 10.5 percent in 2021, as a result of turnarounds in the production of oil and gas, as well as gold. First Oil from the Pecan field is expected in 2024, with a ramp-up of production occurring the following year in 2025. As a result, the Mining and Quarrying sub- sector is projected to grow by 4.3 percent, 2.5 percent, and 8.5 percent in 2023, 2024, and 2025, respectively.

 

Services

  1. Speaker, the Services sector is projected to grow at 8.3 percent in 2021, and

5.6 percent in 2022. The sector was severely hit by the pandemic, but a pre- pandemic growth path is expected to be swiftly restored over the medium-term. The sector is expected to record an average growth rate of 5.4 percent over the medium-term, based on yearly growth rates of 5.2 percent, 5.4 percent, and 5.5 percent in 2023, 2024, and 2025, respectively, as shown in Figure 8.

 

  1. Services Sector performance over the medium-term is expected to be broad- based, led by strong average growth performances in Information and Communication (8.6%), Hotels and Restaurants (6.7%), Education (6.3%), and Real Estate (6.0%).

 

Figure 8: Sectoral Real GDP Growth, 2021-2025 (percent)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

Agriculture

5.3

5.3

5.5

5.5

5.5

Industry

-0.5

6.3

5.6

5.0

7.1

Services

8.3

5.6

5.2

5.4

5.5

Source: MoF, 2021

 

Structure of the Economy (2021-2025)

  1. Speaker, the Services sector (48.7%) is expected to remain the dominant sector over the medium-term in terms of percentage share to overall national output with a share of 48.7 percent, followed by Industry and Agriculture with

30.7 percent and 20.6 percent, respectively. The expected sector shares are shown in Figure 9.

 

Figure 9: Sector Distribution of GDP, 2021-2025

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: MoF, 2021

 

2021 and Medium-Term Monetary and External Sector Outlook
  1. Monetary policy will continue to hinge on sustaining price stability with a view to firmly anchor inflation expectations and create conditions favourable to growth. Inflation is expected to return to the medium-term target band in the near-term, despite the successive upticks in July through September 2021, and should remain within the target band over the medium-term. However, continued rise in food prices, upward petroleum price adjustments and its possible second-round effects on the non-food basket, and pass-through effects of exchange rate depreciation could pose upside risks to the inflation outlook.

 

  1. In line with developments in the year through September 2021, growth of the monetary aggregates is projected to moderate in 2021 and remain stable in the medium-term under the baseline assumption of zero monetary financing, while private sector credit recovers gradually to pre-pandemic

 

  1. In the external sector, the trade account is projected to close the year with a lower surplus on account of lower gold export receipts due to the declining volumes of exports. Moreover, increased economic activity is expected to drive up demand for both non-oil and oil imports, partly contributing to the lower trade These developments in the trade account coupled with higher interest payments are expected to widen the current account deficit in 2021 relative to levels recorded in 2020. On the other hand, the capital and financial account is projected to record significant net inflows, sufficient to finance the current account deficit and significantly improve the overall balance of payment outturn.

 

2022 AND MEDIUM-TERM FISCAL FRAMEWORK

  1. Speaker, strengthening the credibility of our fiscal consolidation programme remains the topmost priority of fiscal policy in 2022 and the medium-term. Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, fiscal policy has been deployed

 

at unprecedented magnitudes to save and protect lives and livelihoods. While these interventions achieved the goal of protecting and saving lives and livelihoods, they have been costly, particularly given the direct impact on public debt levels.

 

  1. Speaker, year 2022 and the medium-term offer an opportunity to reinforce Government’s commitment once again to the fiscal and debt sustainability agenda which commenced this year through continued structural fiscal reforms, legislation of new revenue policy initiatives, particularly on the back of Government’s massive digitalisation drive, and expenditure rationalisation and reforms, among others.

 

  1. Speaker, demand side growth drivers continue to rely on public sector consumption and capital formation, as the private sector continues to recover from the effects of the pandemic. As a result, Government will continue to support the implementation of critical and targeted growth-oriented flagship programmes in addition to the GhanaCARES (Obaatanpa) Programme without compromising on its fiscal consolidation agenda.

 

  1. Speaker, Government remains optimistic about prospects for the economy should the virus containment measures through effective vaccination continue smoothly. This will eliminate the risk of derailment of our consolidation agenda and ensure a quicker return to the Fiscal Responsibility Act (FRA) deficit threshold of 5 percent of GDP by 2024 and a primary surplus by 2022.

 

Summary of Medium-Term Fiscal Framework
  1. Speaker, Government’s medium-term fiscal strategy starting in year 2022, puts Ghana on course to achieve a reasonable primary surplus to stabilise debt in the medium-term which will, over time, reduce borrowing costs. The budget deficit, including energy sector IPPs payments and financial sector clean-up costs in 2022, is projected at 7.4 percent of GDP down from an estimate of 12.1 percent for 2021, representing a deep and bold fiscal consolidation of 4.7 percentage points in just one year. The fiscal deficit is projected to further narrow to 5.5 percent in 2023 and then to 4.5 percent in 2024, below the Fiscal Responsibility Act (FRA) threshold of 5 percent of GDP as shown in Table 20.

 

  1. Speaker, the fiscal position was strong before the pandemic hit. While a temporary increase in spending was necessary to protect lives and livelihoods, the medium-term policy stance is focused on consolidating the public finances to support macroeconomic stability to avoid entering a debt spiral.

 

  1. Speaker, narrowing the budget deficit to constrain the rising public debt level requires strengthening domestic revenue mobilisation and continued restraint in

 

the pace of expenditure growth, as well as strict enforcement of commitment controls in line with the Public Financial Management, 2016 (Act 921).

 

Table 20: Summary of Central Government Fiscal Operations (2021-2025)

No

Item

2022

2023

2024

2025

Budget

Proj.

Proj.

Proj.

1

Total Revenue & Grants

 

100,517

 

112,406

129,961

144,681

 

% of GDP

20.0

20.0

20.5

20.3

 

% Change

42.9

11.8

15.6

11.3

2

Total Expenditures (incl. arrears)

 

137,529

 

143,516

 

158,337

 

174,545

 

% of GDP

27.4

25.5

25.0

24.5

 

% Change

23.2

4.4

10.3

10.2

 

3

Overall Fiscal Balance (incl. Finsec Bailout & IPP

Cost)

 

-37,012

 

-31,110

 

-28,376

 

-29,865

 

% of GDP

-7.4

-5.5

-4.5

-4.2

 

4

Primary Balance

(incl. Finsec Bailout & IPP Cost)

 

435

 

7,135

 

12,937

 

14,090

 

% of GDP

0.1

1.3

2.0

2.0

5

Total Financing

37,012

31,110

28,376

29,865

 

% of GDP

7.4

5.5

4.5

4.2

6

Domestic Financing

27,921

20,170

28,079

29,049

 

% of GDP

5.6

3.6

4.4

4.1

7

Foreign Financing

4,551

10,941

296

816

 

% of GDP

0.9

1.9

0.0

0.1

 

8

Exceptional financing (IMF

SDR)

 

4,540

 

 

 

 

% of GDP

0.9

 

 

 

9

Nominal GDP

502,430

563,175

634,443

712,203

Memo Items

 

6

Overall Fiscal Balance (excl. Finsec Bailout &

IPP Cost)

 

-31,988

 

-26,504

 

-23,842

 

-25,427

 

% of GDP

-6.4

-4.7

-3.8

-3.6

 

7

Primary Balance (excl.

Finsec Bailout & IPP Cost)

 

5,459

 

11,740

 

17,471

 

18,528

 

 

No

Item

2022

2023

2024

2025

Budget

Proj.

Proj.

Proj.

 

% of GDP

1.1

2.1

2.8

2.6

Source: Ministry of Finance

 

Supportive Policy Measures
  1. Speaker, Government is, therefore, proposing for the consideration and approval of the House, fiscal policy measures to underpin the 2022 Budget and to support the fiscal consolidation and growth agenda. The full details of these fiscal policy measures are presented below. The list of the policies includes the following:
  2. Approval for implementation, the revised Exemption Bill;
  3. Implementation of the Unified Common Platform for Property Rate Administration with effect from 1st January, 2022, subject to review every 5 years;
  • Restoration of the Benchmark Values of imports by suspending the 50 percent discount on selected General Goods and the 30 percent discount on vehicles;
  1. Impose an Electronic Transaction Levy (e-transaction levy) of 75 percent on the value of digital transaction and exempt daily transactions of a cumulative value of GH¢100 or less, per person. The recommended effective date of implementation is 1st January, 2022. Annually, up to 0.25 percentage points of the 1.5 percent e-transaction levy (i.e. 16.7% of the yield from the levy) should be used to support road infrastructure development and 10 percent of the 0.25 percentage points (i.e. 1.67% of the yield from the levy) should be dedicated for improvement in public transportation including purchase of buses;
  2. Zero rate tolls (i.e. remove toll charges) on all public roads and reassign the current work force collecting road tolls effective immediately the Budget is approved by Parliament so that they do not become any worse off because of the
  3. Review Fees and Charges with an average increase of at least 15 percent in 2022 and thereafter subject it to automatic annual adjustments by average inflation rate as published by the Ghana Statistical Service, but with the prior consent of the Minister for Finance. The fees and charges should, however, be subjected to general review every 5 years. The effective date of implementation is 1st January 2022;
  • Intensify the Revenue Assurance and Compliance Enforcement (RACE) initiative to plug revenue leakages;
  • For small-scale gold mining, reduce the 3.0 percent withholding tax on sale of unprocessed gold by small-scale miners to 1.5 percent with effect from 1st January, 2022;

 

  1. Implement a modified taxation regime in the Income Tax Act by raising the current threshold on turnover from GHȼ200,000 to GHȼ500,000 for business income of self-employed individual persons;
  2. Review the VAT Flat Rate System (VFRS) by applying the standard VAT rate to all firms except retailers with turnover threshold of between GH¢200,000-GH¢500,000 where the VFRS will apply. The rationale is to address the inequities that domestic producers of local substitutes face vis-à-vis importers of similar products;
  3. Complete existing Infrastructure for Poverty Eradication Programme (IPEP) Projects, with no new projects to be commenced in 2022 and spread the payment of outstanding claims over a period of two years beginning with 2022; and
  • Transition graduating participants on the NABCO programme to the “YouStart” Programme.

 

  1. Speaker, the revenue initiatives alone are expected to yield a minimum of 3 percent of GDP in 2022 and even more annually in the medium-term.

 

  1. Speaker, furthermore, and more importantly, these measures will enhance domestic resource mobilisation and reduce our reliance on borrowing to fund our development needs. Indeed, the measures will improve our fiscal consolidation drive as reflected in the downward adjustment of 4.7 percentages of the fiscal deficit in 2022. Some of the notable improvements in the fiscal framework of 2022 relative to 2021 include:
  2. Non-Oil Tax Revenue (including proposed revenue policy measures) for 2022 is projected to grow by about 2 percent on year-on-year basis compared to an estimated 24.4 percent for 2021. This moves the Non-Oil Tax-to-GDP ratio from about 12.0 percent in 2021 to about 15 percent in 2022 and rises further to about 16.0 percent by 2025. Excluding the impact of the new revenue measures results in a year-on-year growth of 17.5 percent and a Non-Oil Tax-to-GDP ratio of 12.3 percent in 2022;
  3. The fiscal framework reduces the ratio of the wage bill to Tax Revenue from a projected 50.8 percent in 2021 to about 38.5 percent in 2022, reducing further to about 36 percent over the medium-term; and
  • The improvement in the fiscal deficit (including energy sector IPPs payments and finsec bailout costs) narrows the primary deficit from 4.7 percent to a surplus of 1 percent in 2022, and remains positive thereafter.

 

Resource Mobilisation and Allocation For 2022 Resource Mobilisation for 2022
  1. Speaker, Total Revenue and Grants for 2022 is projected to rise to GH¢100,517 million (20.0 percent of GDP), up from a projected outturn of GH¢70,347 million (16.0 percent of GDP) for 2021. As shown in Figure 10, Domestic Revenue is estimated at GH¢99,547 million and represents an annual

 

growth of 44.0 percent over the projected outturn for 2021. Of the total Domestic Revenue amount, Non-Oil Tax Revenue constitutes about 77.5 percent and amounts to GH¢77,136 million (15.4 percent of GDP), representing an increase of 46.2 percent from the 2021 projected outturn.

 

  1. Speaker, the resource mobilisation for 2022 is underpinned by the legislation of some new tax policy initiatives to support revenue mobilisation. The increase in Domestic Revenue by 44.0 percent is explained by the impact of expected improvements in tax compliance, reforms in revenue administration, as well as the rack of tax policy initiatives outlined earlier.

 

  1. Speaker, Non-Tax Revenue (excluding oil) is projected at GH¢10,254 million (2.0 percent of GDP) and constitutes about 10.3 percent of Domestic Revenue. Of this amount, GH¢8,319 million will be retained for use by MDAs while GH¢1,936 million will be lodged, with a potential yield of GH¢152 million from the IGF Capping Policy.

 

  1. Speaker, receipts from upstream petroleum activities are projected at GH¢6,628 million (1.3 percent of GDP), representing a 23.6 percent growth over the projected outturn for 2021, mainly on the back of expected increase in both benchmark production and price of crude oil.

 

  1. Speaker, total receipts from Other Revenue—comprising SSNIT transfers to the NHIL, ESL including the Delta Fund, and the Pollution & Sanitation Levy will amount to GH¢5,528 million (1.1% of GDP), indicating an increase of 18.7 percent over the projected outturn of GH¢4,656 million (1.1% of GDP) in 2021.

 

  1. Speaker, Grants disbursement from Development Partners is estimated at GH¢970 million (0.2% of GDP), reflecting a nominal contraction of 19.0 percent over the 2021 projected outturn of GH¢1,198 million as shown in Figure 10. Anticipated Grants disbursements are solely Project-related.

 

Figure 10: Resource Mobilisation for 2022 (in GH¢ Million)

Source: MoF

 

Resource Allocation for 2022

  1. Speaker, Total Expenditure (including clearance of Arrears) is projected at GH¢137,529 million (27.4% of GDP). The estimate for 2022 represents a growth of 23.2 percent above the projected outturn of GH¢111,645 million (25.3% of GDP) for 2021. The key drivers of expenditure growth include Capital Expenditure, funding of key Government flagship programmes including the GhanaCares “Obaatanpa” Programme, wage bill, and interest payment.

 

  1. Speaker, Compensation of Employees is projected at GH¢35,841 million (7.1% of GDP) and constitute 26.1 percent of the Total Expenditure (including Arrears clearance).

 

  1. Speaker, Use of Goods and Services is also projected at GH¢9,149 million (1.8% of GDP). This represents 6.7 percent of the projected Total Expenditure (including Arrears clearance).

 

  1. Speaker, Interest Payment are projected at GH¢37,447 million (7.5% of GDP). Of this amount, Domestic Interest due will constitute about 77.3 percent and amount to GH¢28,943 million. To reduce the cost of borrowing, Government will continue to explore options of reprofiling domestic debt in 2022.

 

  1. Speaker, in 2022, Government will continue to implement the Earmarked Funds Capping and Realignment Act to reduce budget rigidities and create fiscal space to fund growth-enhancing expenditures as has been done since 2017. The 5 percent transfer to the DACF has been computed in line with the Supreme Court

 

Ruling of 12th June, 2019 on the DACF allocation. Consequently, Grants to Other Government Units which comprise the transfers to Statutory Funds as well as all Other Earmarked Funds is estimated at GH¢26,828 million (5.3% of GDP).

 

  1. Speaker, Capital Expenditure (CAPEX) is projected at GH¢16,396 million (3.3% of GDP), representing a growth of 28.8 percent over the projected 2021 outturn. Of this amount, Domestically Financed CAPEX is estimated at GH¢7,795 million (1.6% of GDP) as shown in Figure 11. An amount of GH¢8,601 million has been estimated for Foreign Financed CAPEX and this will be funded by a combination of Project Grants and Loans.

 

  1. Speaker, Other Expenditure, mainly comprising Energy Sector Levies (ESL) transfers, and starting from 2022 also payments to Independent Power Producers (IPPs) and Financial Sector costs (GAT capitalisation), is estimated at GH¢9,967 million.

 

Figure 11: Resource Allocation for 2022 (in GH¢ Million)

Source: MoF

 

Budget Balances and Financing Operations for 2022

  1. Speaker, based on the estimates for Total Revenue & Grants and Total Expenditure (including arrears clearance), the 2022 fiscal operations will result in an overall fiscal deficit (including finsec costs and IPPs payments) of GH¢37,012 million, equivalent to 7.4 percent of GDP. The corresponding Primary Surplus of GH¢435 million, equivalent to 0.1 percent of GDP, is also projected for the year.

 

  1. Speaker, total Foreign financing and Exceptional financing (use of IMF SDR allocation) will amount to GH¢9,091 million (1.8% of GDP). Foreign financing will include a planned international financing programme to raise at least US$750

 

million with an option to increase it by a further US$750 million for budget support and liability management. On the other hand, financing of the deficit from domestic sources including net issuances from debt will amount to GH¢27,921 million (5.6% of GDP). The Exceptional Financing from the use of the newly allocated SDRs by the IMF will augment and reduce domestic borrowing needs.

 

  1. Speaker, in 2022, we have made provision to replenish the Contingency Fund with an additional amount of GH¢473 million.

 

2022 and Medium-Term Debt Management Strategy
  1. Speaker, the Medium-Term Debt Management Strategy will propose appropriate financing for the period 2022 – 2025 which sets out to achieve the following objectives:
    • meet Government’s funding needs on a timely basis and at a relatively lower cost subject to prudent levels of risk;
    • promote the development of efficient primary and secondary markets; and
    • pursue any other action considered to impact positively on the public debt

 

  1. Speaker, the financing for 2022 seeks to further develop the domestic market by proposing new instruments to diversify the debt portfolio and increase the debt financing capacity of the domestic market. Government would continue to build benchmark bonds, by taping in or reopening medium to long-term bonds.

 

  1. Speaker, to support the insurance industry in the growth of the annuity market, Government will issue longer dated bonds to match assets to liabilities and consistent with the MTDs strategy. Treasury bills will continue to be offered for liquidity and cash buffers to account for cash flow demand seasonalities.

 

  1. Speaker, external financing for the budget in 2022 will be supported by receipts of IMF SDR allocation and syndicated loans from commercial banks. In the medium-term, Government will explore the option of various instruments on the ICM based on market conditions.

 

  1. Over the medium term, Government will continue its liability management programme and will explore opportunities to reduce the level of risk embedded in the public debt portfolio through buy-backs or debt

 

2022 Debt Sustainability Analysis and External Debt Limits
  1. Speaker, the medium-term fiscal framework is anchored on debt sustainability. The outcome of Ghana’s Debt Sustainability Analysis (DSA) indicates a sustainable debt trajectory, albeit at high risk of debt distress. This is largely on account of financial and energy sector bailout costs, and the one-off

 

fiscal costs of measures to boost economic activity following the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

  1. Nevertheless, Government’s fiscal consolidation plan has been accelerated for the medium to long-term. The 2022 primary balance is projected to be positive for the first time post COVID 19 pandemic in This is a very strong commitment of Government to taper the debt to GDP ratio and also improve significantly the debt liquidity ratios.

 

  1. Speaker, further to this objective, and to support the reduction in the rate of debt accumulation, the total limits set for concessional and non-concessional external borrowing have been scaled down from US$2,500.0 million to US$2,000.0 million (See details of the approved list of projects/programmes in Appendix 10C.

 

Update on 2022 International Capital Market Funding Programme and Sustainable Development
  1. Speaker, current global financing conditions show a risk of rising inflationary trends with possible overheating of most advanced economies, and a potential for increased cost of international financing.

 

  1. Speaker, despite these challenging conditions on the international capital market, it is always advisable for Government to administratively structure its funding sources to take advantage of available opportunities whenever the risks get abated, and the outlook becomes favourable. Potential multiple instruments that Government may explore if market conditions permit are listed as follows:
    • Regular Eurobond;
    • Social Instruments for social bonds & social loans to refinance/refinance MDA projects within eligible social categories;
    • Term loan and/ or bridge financing;
    • Green instruments for green bonds & green loans to refinance/refinance MDA projects within eligible green categories; and
    • Sustainability Instruments for sustainability bonds to refinance/refinance MDA projects within eligible green & social

 

  1. Speaker, Government is committed to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Based on the newly developed Sustainable Financing Framework, Government through the Ministry of Finance, will periodically screen programmes and projects proposed by the various Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs) for green and/or social elements.

 

  1. These programmes and projects will form the basis for issuances of Green, Social or Sustainability Financing transactions, either to finance new or refinance existing expenditures that have been identified in accordance with this Sustainability Financing Framework, and which are consistent with the

 

International Capital Market Association (ICMA) Green Bond Principles 2021 (GBP), Social Bond Principles 2021 (SBP), and Sustainability Bond Guidelines 2021 (SBG).

 

  1. Speaker, with this Framework, Ghana will be charting a new territory by creating an integrated framework that enables the Government to issue instruments in either a use-of-proceeds format or sustainability-linked format.

 

Ghana Stock Exchange Outlook for 2022
  1. Speaker, the GSE will continue to collaborate with the Ministry of Finance and the State Interests and Governance Authority (SIGA) to enhance access to long- term capital and improve corporate governance practices by listing state-owned enterprises (SOEs) on any of the GSE’s three markets. The GSE will also sustain its partnerships with the Association of Ghana Industries (AGI) and various industry chambers of commerce and associations to increase listings and drive liquidity on its markets.

 

  1. Speaker, the GSE will increase its engagements with the National Pension Regulatory Authority (NPRA) and its members to boost the pension industry’s investments in the real sectors of the economy. The GSE will also develop other products, such as Green Market products and derivatives, to increase the investing opportunities of pension funds. This will enable them to diversify their growing asset base to better balance their risk and returns.

 

  1. The GSE is in the process of signing on to the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) for listed companies to comply with global standards on sustainability

 

  1. Speaker, in line with its strategic plan, the GSE will continue to introduce FINTECH-related products and invest in technology to improve participation in its markets. While undertaking these initiatives to improve its cybersecurity and to forestall the attendant risks that accompany such technology, the GSE has also taken steps to obtain ISO Certification.

 

  1. The GSE will strengthen its relations with its international partners and associations to position it as an internationally recognised securities market. It will also participate in projects such as the Africa Securities Linkage Project which seeks to establish a Single Borderless African Capital

 

  1. Speaker, the GSE is also one of the four exchanges collaborating on a project known as the West African Capital Market Integration (WACMI) project. The aim of the project is to establish a harmonised regulatory environment for the issuance and trading of financial securities across the region. The project, which is in its second phase, will see the trading of securities across the region by qualified brokers when approved by the Regulators.

 

 

Ghana Fixed Income Market (GFIM) Outlook for 2022
  1. Speaker, the development and growth of the corporate bond market will be the key focus of the GFIM in 2022. Several initiatives will be undertaken to boost the development of the corporate bonds market. Key among them is the operationalisation of the Domestic Credit Rating Agency (DCRA) in 2022. The establishment of the DCRA will promote credit-culture, risk-based lending, and equitable pricing of debt instruments. It will also reduce information asymmetry between market participants and facilitate investment decisions by helping investors obtain relevant information to achieve a balance in the risk profile and assist firms to access capital.

 

  1. Speaker, to deepen the liquidity of the market, 2022 has been slated as the year to launch securities lending and borrowing under the Global Master Securities Lending Agreements. Preparatory work by way of drafting of guidelines for securities lending and borrowing and the country annex to the global standards have already been done. The standards will be launched and operationalised at least by the last quarter of 2022.

 

2022 & Medium-Term Petroleum Receipts and Utilisation
  1. Speaker, the Benchmark crude oil price for 2022, estimated as a seven-year moving average in line with the PRMA, is US$61.23 per barrel, up from the US$54.75 per barrel for 2021 as indicated in the 2021 Budget. The crude oil prices were sourced from the following:
    • ICE Dated Brent Crude Bloomberg Historical Prices from 2017 to 2020;
    • A combination of ICE Dated Brent Crude Bloomberg actuals and futures prices for 2021; and
    • ICE Dated Brent futures from Bloomberg for 2022 and

 

2022 Benchmark Output
  1. The 2022 Benchmark crude oil output is 51 million barrels (163,044 barrels of crude oil per day), based on a three-year simple average of each producing field’s actual and projected outputs in line with the PRMA. Similarly, the Benchmark gas output, has been estimated at 96.54 trillion Btu for 2022.

 

2022 Benchmark Revenue
  1. Speaker, the projected Petroleum Benchmark Revenue for 2022 is estimated at US$1,006.1 million. This is made up of Royalties of US$206.5 million, Carried and Participating Interest of US$537.6 million, Corporate Income Tax of US$

261.1 million and Surface Rentals of US$0.92 million, as shown in Table 21. Petroleum receipts are projected to increase to US$1,033.2 million in 2023, US$1,060.7 million in 2024, and US$1,017.2 million in 2025 as shown in Table 21.

 

 

 

Table 21: Sources of Petroleum Revenue in 2022 & Medium-term

No.

Items

Unit

2022

2023

2024

2025

1

Royalties

USD mn

206.48

194.43

185.31

 

171.80

2

o/w Crude Oil

USD mn

206.48

194.43

185.31

 

171.80

3

o/w Gas

USD mn

4

Carried and Participating Interest

USD mn

537.61

507.20

484.88

 

449.60

5

o/w Crude Oil

USD mn

537.61

507.20

484.88

 

449.60

6

o/w Gas

USD mn

7

Corporate Income Tax

USD mn

261.13

330.60

389.44

 

394.72

8

Surface Rentals

USD mn

0.92

0.99

1.05

1.07

3

TOTAL PETROLEUM RECEIPTS

USD mn

1,006.14

1,033.23

1,060.69

 

1,017.19

Memo

1

Price

USD/Bbl

61.23

62.09

60.89

60.90

2

Benchmark Production (Oil)

Million Bbl

59.51

55.99

55.27

51.57

Source: MoF

 

  1. Of this amount, US$326.98 million will be ceded to the National Oil Company (GNPC) for its Equity Financing Cost (US$236.71million) and share of the net Carried and Participating Interest (US$103.67 million), as shown in Table

 

Table 22: Revenue Distribution in the Medium-Term (GNPC & GOG)

No.

Items

Unit

2022

2023

2024

2025

1

Transfer to National Oil Company (NOC)

USD mn

326.98

242.22

227.93

207.93

1.1

o/w Equity Financing

USD mn

236.71

128.66

117.80

104.35

1.2

o/w 30% Net CAPI

USD mn

90.27

113.56

110.12

103.57

2

Benchmark         Revenue (BR)

USD mn

679.16

791.01

832.76

809.26

 

2.1

o/w Annual Budget Funding Amount

(ABFA)

 

USD mn

 

475.41

 

553.70

 

582.94

 

566.49

 

2.2

o/w Transfer to the Ghana

Petroleum Funds (GPFs)

 

USD mn

 

203.75

 

237.30

 

249.83

 

242.78

 

 

No.

Items

Unit

2022

2023

2024

2025

2.2.1

o/w Ghana Stabilization Fund

USD mn

142.62

166.11

174.88

169.95

2.2.2

o/w Ghana Heritage Fund

USD mn

61.12

71.19

74.95

72.83

 

Total Amount Distributed

USD mn

1,006.14

1,033.23

1,060.69

1,017.19

Source: MoF

 

  1. The Benchmark Revenue for 2022, which is the petroleum receipts net the amount ceded to the NOC, is estimated at US$679.2 million. Of this amount, a sum of US$475.4 million has been allocated to the ABFA to support the implementation of the 2022 Budget, while the Ghana Petroleum Funds (GPFs) will receive US$203.75 The GPFs receipts will be distributed between the Ghana Stabilisation Fund (US$142.6 million) and the Ghana Heritage Fund (US$61.1 million) as shown in Table 22.

 

  1. The ABFA Allocation for the 2022 in the approved priority areas namely, (i) Agriculture, (ii) Education and Health Service Delivery, (iii) Roads, Rail, and Other Critical Infrastructure, and (iv) Industrial Development are shown in the Appendix Table 5. In line with Section 13 of Petroleum Revenue Management Act 2015, (ACT 893) and Section 5 of Ghana Infrastructure Investment Fund (Amendment) Act 2021 (Act 1063), the Public Interest and Accountability Committee (PIAC) has been allocated an amount of GH¢5,767,000 to support their operations in 2022, as shown in the Appendix

 

FISCAL POLICY INITIATIVES UNDERPINNING THE 2022 BUDGET

Revenue Policy Measures
  1. Speaker, domestic revenue mobilisation is the key for garnering the needed resources to support our development agenda and make the vision of ‘Ghana Beyond Aid’ a reality. We cannot, therefore, as a Nation continue to depend on only 8.2 percent of our citizens to carry the burden of 30 million people to mobilise the needed resources for development. This is unsustainable and defeats all the tenets of economic prudence and moral justice.

 

  1. Speaker, our resolve to use revenue policy to support local industry and generate the desired environment for growth has not waned. In the coming year, Government will introduce measures that will revamp industry and make their products competitive in both the local and international markets. In this respect, it has become increasingly necessary to make some policy changes.

 

Support to Industry

Revision to the Flat Rate VAT Scheme

  1. In 2019, VAT relief was provided on African textile prints for textile manufacturers to enable them resuscitate their operations and provide affordable textiles to the

 

market. This policy has succeeded in stabilising the industry and formed the basis for a modest increase in production. The companies have also maintained their prices over the period making the cost of local prints affordable. Additionally, they have been able to keep their employees and made some investments in the industry as result of this Policy. To consolidate the gains and expand production in the industry, Government has decided to extend the Relief for a further two years.

 

  1. The VAT Flat Rate of 3 percent of the sale price of goods was introduced in 2017 on the supply of goods by wholesalers and retailers. Subsequent reforms to the taxes on the supply of goods and services have made local goods with imported substitutes uncompetitive, thus exposing the sector to the risk of contractions. Government intends to correct this anomaly by limiting the Flat Rate to only All other supply of goods and services will attract the Standard rate.

 

  1. The objective of the Flat Rate is to provide a simplified system for small scale To ensure that this objective is achieved, the rate will be applied to retailers with annual turnover not exceeding GH¢500,000. All other retailers and wholesalers will charge the Standard rate

 

  1. This will address the inequities that domestic producers of local substitutes face vis-à-vis importers of similar products. This obviously, will create a level playing field for all taxpayers and bring additional efficiency to VAT

 

Import Benchmark Review

  1. After two and a half years of operation, the temporal benchmark (discount) policy on imports introduced as a stop-gap measure will be reviewed to make it more efficient and targeted. The review will align the policy with current development needs to protect the environment, local industry, strengthen public safety, and support public The review will cover vehicles and selected general goods.

 

Compliance and Revenue Assurance
  1. Mr Speaker, revenue compliance and enforcement sits at the heart of domestic revenue mobilisation. The Ghana Revenue Authority supported by Revenue Assurance and Compliance Enforcement (RACE) will continue with its enhanced compliance measures to expand coverage and plug revenue leakages.

 

  1. The Modified Taxation System introduced in 2015 through the Income Tax Act, 2015 (Act 896) is to provide a simplified system of tax compliance for the informal sector and small scale individuals in business. The policy will be implemented in 2022 to expand the tax net, make tax payment simpler, improve compliance, and ultimately enhance the contribution of people in this tax category to total tax Basic record keeping templates and a simplified tax return has been

 

designed to support the policy. Consideration will be made to review the threshold from GH¢200,000 to GH¢ 500,000 per annum.

 

Relief to small-scale Gold Miners
  1. Exports of unprocessed gold by small scale miners through official channels has dwindled from over one million six hundred ounces in 2019 to below one hundred thousand ounces as at September 2021. To stem this tide, Government in consultation with the stakeholders in the industry has decided to reduce the withholding tax rate for sale of unprocessed gold by small scale miners on whom the incidence of the tax falls from 3 percent to 1.5 percent Government is committed to working with the relevant agencies and stakeholders in the industry to ensure

 

Review of Property Rates
  1. Property rates have the potential to increase revenue mobilisation for MMDAs and release resources for provision of basic infrastructure as well as the needs of our Property rate assessment and collection poses a challenge to most MMDAs and is fraught with inefficiencies. Government, through the Ghana Revenue Authority will from January 2022, assist the MMDAs to implement a common platform for property rate administration to enhance Property rate collections and its accountability. To ensure cost recovery by Government in providing the infrastructure for the collection of the Property Rate, a sharing ratio will be agreed with the Assemblies.

 

Review of Fees and Charges
  1. Government will review fees and charges of MDAs for implementation from 1st January, 2022. The fees and charges will be subject to automatic adjustment consistent with the annual average inflation as announced by the Ghana Statistical Service (GSS) with the consent of the Minister responsible for A comprehensive review will be conducted after every fifth-year taking into consideration, other factors besides inflation including, improvement in quality of service delivery and privatisation of some of the services where feasible.

 

Removal of Road Tolls

  1. Mr Speaker, Government is currently charging tolls on some public roads to raise funds for road construction and maintenance. Over the years, however, the tolling points have led to heavy vehicular traffic and lengthened travel time from one place to another, impacting negatively on time and The congestion generated at the tolling points, besides creating these inconveniences, also leads to pollution in and around those vicinities.

 

  1. To address these challenges, Government will zero-rate tolls on all public roads and bridges. This takes effect immediately the Budget is approved. The tolling points will be removed and the toll collection personnel It is

 

anticipated that this Policy will help reduce congestion on the tolled roads, allow free flow of vehicles, reduce travel time and the pollution caused by emissions from vehicles in and around the tolling points. The expected impact on productivity and reduced environmental pollution will more than off-set the revenue forgone from removing the tolls.

 

Expanding the Tax Net

  1. Speaker, over the past 18 months, it has become clear that if the African continent is to be globally competitive, it must embrace the common vision of creating an integrated and inclusive digital society that improves the quality of life of citizens, strengthens the development of the private sector, and advances Africa’s quest to attain the Sustainable Development Goals.

 

  1. Speaker, COVID-19 contributed to the acceleration of the digitalisation of Africa. According to the UNECA, 61 percent of a sample of firms surveyed on the continent reported an increase in online sales since the start of the pandemic, while more than 60 percent of micro-sized enterprises identified online selling as a “top new opportunity” in reaction to the crisis.

 

  1. As it stands, the global digital economy is set to grow from $11.5 trillion in 2016 to over $23 trillion by 2025 (UNECA). Ghana must be part of today’s networked As a Gnment, we will focus on improving access, cost and speed of internet access while also leveraging on digital platforms to augment fiscal policy and better shape the delivery of public services.

 

  1. To better understand the nature of the transactions being undertaken on digital platforms, a survey across the country was recently The preliminary results from this survey confirms that digital transactions have become the “primary” tool in recent times for the payment for goods and services as well as for transfers and remittances locally, and in some cases, abroad. The survey also showed that digital transactions have far surpassed cash and cheques as the preferred medium for transactions.

 

  1. Speaker, data from the Bank of Ghana also confirmed growing trend in online selling. The data showed that between February 2020 and February 2021 alone, Ghana saw an increase of over 120 percent in the value of digital transactions compared to 44 percent for the period February 2019 to February 2020. Apart from the convenience the online selling offers to some Ghanaians, the surge, we believe, was primarily due to the increase in the use of digital platforms due to the COVID-19 pandemic at the beginning of 2020.

 

  1. The total value of transactions for 2020 was estimated to be over GH¢500 billion compared to GH¢257 billion in 2019 and GH¢78 billion in 2016 (just 5 years ago) while total mobile money subscribers and active mobile money users have grown

 

by an average rate of 18 percent and 16 percent, respectively between 2016 and 2019. Meanwhile the active mobile voice subscribers have grown by an annual average of only 2 percent and mobile data subscriptions at 8 percent over the last 5 years.

 

  1. According to a report by the Global System for Mobile Communication (GSMA), an industry organisation that represents the interests of mobile network operators, the number of registered mobile money accounts grew by 12.7 per cent globally to 21 billion accounts in 2020 – double the forecasted growth rate. Furthermore, the value of transactions between mobile money platforms and banks grew fourfold, reaching US$68 billion in 2020, up from just US$15 billion in 2015

 

  1. Speaker, following this observation, there exists significant potential to increase tax revenues by bringing into the tax bracket, transactions that could be best defined as being undertaken in the “shadow economy”.

 

  1. After considerable deliberation, Government has decided to place a levy on all electronic transactions to widen the tax net and rope in the informal This shall be known as the “Electronic Transaction Levy” or “E-Levy”.

 

  1. Electronic transactions covering, mobile money payments, bank transfers, merchant payments, and inward remittances will be charged at an applicable rate of 1.75 percent, which shall be borne by the sender, except inward remittances which will be borne by the

 

  1. Speaker, to safeguard efforts being made to enhance financial inclusion and protect the vulnerable, all transactions that add up to GH¢100 or less per day (which is approximately GH¢3000 per month) will be exempt from this levy.

 

  1. A portion of the proceeds from the E-Levy will be used to support entrepreneurship, youth employment, cyber security, digital and road infrastructure, among

 

  1. Speaker, this new policy comes into effect from 1st February, 2022. Government, therefore, calls on all industry partners to ensure that their systems and payment platforms are configured to implement the policy by 1st February, 2022.

 

Tax Exemptions
  1. Speaker, after undergoing several reviews the Exemptions Bill has been completed and laid before Parliament. We hope to work with this House for final passage and implementation in 2022.

 

  1. Speaker, to sum up, Government wishes to reiterate that we are in challenging times, which require radical measures, so let us all embrace these new policies to enable Government address the fundamental issues affecting the economy to ensure that our Nation continues to maintain its position as the black star of the Continent.

 

Expenditure Policy Measures
  1. Speaker, to contain expenditures and further enhance fiscal sustainability, a number of expenditure measures will be implemented in the 2022 fiscal year and the medium-term.

 

  1. Speaker, Government will continue to safeguard the integrity of the payroll system to ensure that only public sector employees properly engaged through approved channels are placed on the Government payroll. In furtherance of this, regular payroll audits will be carried out to identify ghost and unapproved workers and expunge their names from the payroll. Those found culpable and implicated in this unpatriotic behaviour will be brought to book and face the full rigour of the applicable PFM laws. The Principal Spending Officers in charge of payroll will also be held liable for any payroll infractions.

 

  1. Speaker, Government has, with immediate effect, suspended the granting of approval for post-retirement contract appointments, except in cases where the skills of the retiring officer are in short supply and unavoidably needed.

 

  1. Speaker, in addition, a staff rationalisation exercise will be carried out in 2022 and the medium-term to instill efficiency in the allocation of staff to government institutions with the view to right-sizing the public sector workforce. In line with this, there will be a limit on the creation of new institutions with varying conditions of service and attendant costs. Should the need arise for a new institution to be created, staff shall be sourced from existing staff on government payroll, except under exceptional circumstances where the skill set required cannot be found in the public service. To this end, the Public Services Commission shall be resourced and strengthened to work with the Office of the Head of Civil Service, Office of the Local Government Service, and other relevant stakeholders to ensure that Government’s objective with respect to this policy is achieved.

 

  1. Speaker, Section 33 (5) of the Public Financial Management Act, 2016 (Act 921) states that, “A Principal Spending Officer may propose or commit to invest in a project only after expert assessment has been completed and the justification for the investment project and efficiency is established”. The process to be embarked on to undertake the expert assessment and obtain the requisite approvals is expressly provisioned for in the Public Financial Management (Public Investment Management) Regulations, 2020 (L.I. 2411).

 

  1. To this end, all new projects announced in the 2022 Budget and those included in the Medium-Term Development Plans of MDAs, MMDAs and SOEs shall, irrespective of their funding source, be subjected to the processes outlined in I. 2411 to ensure efficiency and effectiveness in the delivery of public infrastructure and provision of public goods and services. Therefore, no Commencement Certificates shall be issued to any covered entity which does not comply with the process in the above-mentioned laws.

 

  1. Furthermore, Regulation 11 (a) and (b) of L.I. 2411 will be strictly enforced. Accordingly, all on-going investment projects, new investment projects to be funded with grants from development partners, and new PPP projects or concessions that are wholly or partially funded by a private sector partner:
    • shall be a first charge in the development of the Public Investment Plan and the budget of the covered entity within the constraints of the Medium-Term Expenditure Framework consistent with the Medium-Term Fiscal Framework; and
    • will implemented and fully paid for before new investment projects are admitted into the Public Investment Plan and consequently the National Budget based on available fiscal space within the Medium-Term Expenditure

 

  1. Speaker, to further contain expenditures in 2022 and the medium-term, we will reinforce Government’s policy to suspend the purchase of vehicles by MDAs and MMDAs except with the express approval of the Chief of Staff based on a preapproved budget provision. Also MDAs must use competitive methods of procurement and minimise the use of Single Source processes to ensure value for money.

 

  1. Speaker, the use of the Ghana Integrated Financial Management System (GIFMIS) in initiating and processing all requests will be strictly enforced to minimise off-budget expenditures and enhance commitment control. Additionally, GIFMIS will be retooled to accommodate a module that will allow potential contractors and suppliers of goods and services to verify and confirm availability of funding for Awards of Contract.

 

  1. Speaker, to preserve the credibility, integrity, and relevance of the Multi-Year Fiscal Strategy, all MDAs and MMDAs must strictly commit to their respective appropriated expenditure ceilings for obligations relating to each individual year specified in multi-year contracts.

 

  1. Speaker, furthermore, the following expenditure commitments control measures will be enforced to avoid veering off the chartered medium-term fiscal consolidation path.

 

  • Only items specified in approved MDAs’ Procurement Plans posted on the PPA website can be considered for procurement
  • All procurement requests by procurement entities relating to a particular fiscal year must be backed by budgetary allocations approved for that This notwithstanding, all such requests must also be based on actual confirmed sources and availability of funding.
  • All procurement approvals by the Public Procurement Authority (PPA), the Central Tender Review Committee (CTRC), and the Entity Tender Committees (ETCs) relating to a particular fiscal year must be backed by budgetary allocations approved for that year. This notwithstanding, all such approvals must also be based on actual confirmed sources and availability of
  • No public official must sign any MOU or agreement that commits the Government of Ghana financially without prior approval or clearance from the Minister for Finance

 

SECTION FIVE: TRANSFORMING THE ECONOMY BEYOND COVID-19 PANDEMIC

GhanaCARES “Obaatan Pa” Programme
  1. Speaker, at the core of the President’s vision for a Ghana Beyond Aid is “a prosperous and self-confident Ghana that is in charge of her economic destiny”. Clearly, this vision is informed by the fact that economic growth in the past did not translate into significant changes in the structure of our economy; neither has it created enough jobs to absorb the rapidly expanding workforce.

 

  1. To move this vision closer to reality, Government began to lay the foundation for transformation during our first term, by restoring macro-fiscal balance, energising the real sector, reforming the business environment, and restructuring the financial sector. It also embarked on ambitious and transformative flagship programmes to drive economic growth and improve the livelihoods of our

 

  1. Speaker, these flagship programmes are: Free Senior High School; Planting for Food and Jobs; One District One Factory; Nation Builders’ Corps; Roads and Highways; Railway Development; Water and Sanitation; Fish Landing Sites; Creation of New Regions; Infrastructure for Poverty Eradication; Zongo Development Fund; and National Identification. These flagships were based on strategies outlined in the President’s Coordinated Programme of Economic and Social Development Policies (2017 – 2024) and the Ghana Beyond Aid Charter.

 

  1. Speaker, as significant progress was made towards achieving key development targets, the COVID-19 pandemic hit the global community. The progress made prior to the onset of the pandemic and the quality of the results achieved enabled us to largely blunt the severest impact of the pandemic. In order to directly respond to the threat posed by COVID-19, Government, under the able leadership of H.E. The President, quickly developed a relief, resilience and recovery blueprint with the overarching aim of protecting the lives and livelihoods of Ghanaians, and strengthening the productive sectors of the economy to drive the transformation agenda.

 

  1. Speaker, this blueprint is the GH¢100 billion Ghana COVID-19 Alleviation and Revitalisation of Enterprises Support Programme, (the GhanaCARES “Obaatan Pa” Programme), which was formally launched almost a year ago on 20th November, 2020. The programme built on the initiatives and achievements prior to COVID-19 is made up of two parts: (a) immediate measures taken in 2020 to stabilise the economy; and (b) a revitalisation part comprising measures to be implemented from 2021 to 2023 to ensure quick economic recovery and pursue the Ghana Beyond Aid economic transformation agenda.

 

  1. Mr Speaker, the CARES programme has three key thrusts. The first is to support the private sector, particularly in agribusiness, manufacturing, ICT, and The second is to aggressively support entrepreneurship in order to create job opportunities for the growing and increasingly educated youth. The third thrust is to optimise implementation of Government’s transformation agenda for greater results.

 

  1. Speaker, the “Obaatan Pa” programme will help to reduce our dependence on imports of goods which Ghana has the potential to produce competitively, such as food, basic pharmaceuticals and other light manufacturing products. This will also promote economic diversification and exports and better position us to take advantage of AfCFTA.

 

  1. The “Obaatan Pa” will improve food security, accelerate industrialisation, create jobs, strengthen foreign exchange reserves position, stabilise the exchange rate, and strengthen overall resilience of the Ghanaian

 

  1. Speaker, this section provides an update on the implementation of the CARES programme, as well as other key targeted interventions to return the economy to a sustainable fiscal path, promote entrepreneurship among the youth, and advance our collective goal of economic transformation in a climate-friendly and gender-sensitive manner.

 

PROGRESS TO-DATE AND OUTLOOK FOR 2022

  1. Speaker, the exigent and transformative mission of the CARES programme implied that we could not proceed with a “business as usual” approach. We, therefore, swiftly adopted a compact framework to strongly tie resources to results through a collaborative process. So far, eight implementation Compacts have been signed between the Ministry of Finance and the following implementing agencies: Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MoFA); Ministry of Tourism, Arts and Culture (MoTAC); Ministry of Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation (MESTI); Ministry of Trade and Industry (MoTI); Ministry of Communications and Digitalisation (MoCD); Ghana Investment Promotion Centre (GIPC); Ghana Revenue Authority (GRA); and with the Financial Sector Division of the Ministry of Finance on behalf of the Ghana Incentive-Based Risk Sharing System for Agricultural Lending (GIRSAL), Ghana Commodity Exchange (GCX), and the National Housing Fund (NHF).

 

  1. These CARES Delivery Units (CDUs) were operationalised in all participating institutions to ensure dedicated focus on implementation of agreed Each CDU is made up of technical officers from within the Ministry or Agency, supported by professional programme management specialists, mostly from outside the public sector. This unique blend of experience is intended to enhance programme management and delivery of results.

 

 

  1. Speaker, Government has also established the CARES Coordinating Unit (CCU) in the Ministry of Finance (MoF) to provide oversight and technical support for the respective CARES Delivery Units. The CCU is manned by technical officers from MoF and supported by experts from outside the public sector. Working together, the CCU and CDUs have deployed programme management platforms and tools to enable timely reporting and feedback on key performance indicators.

 

  1. Speaker, to bring additional impetus to the implementation of the GhanaCARES “Obaatan Pa” programme, Government is actively engaging the Millenium Development Authority (MiDA) to leverage MiDA’s acquired experience in transformative development programme management.

 

Modernisation of Agriculture and Food import-substitution
  1. Speaker, in alignment with Government’s overall vision and medium-term priorities, accelerated Agricultural Modernisation is a major intervention under GhanaCARES. The objective is to build on existing programmes, such as “Planting for Food and Jobs” and “Rearing for Food and Jobs”, by supporting commercial farming (particularly by the educated youth) and agro-processing for value- addition in order to ensure rapid competitive food-import substitution, job creation, exports, and industrialisation.

 

  1. Speaker, a critical component of the agricultural modernisation programme is to register and create an electronic database of farmers to provide ready access to relevant information such as farm size, digital location, types of crops, yields, and market linkages. The ultimate aim of the database is to improve tracking, targeting, efficiency and transparency in public support programmes to the sector.

 

  1. The database will also have a platform with a feature for tracking fertilizer and seed distribution to reduce malpractices to enable us extend more support to our

 

  1. Speaker, a total of 579,662 individuals, comprising 547,126 farmers and 32,536 value-chain actors, have been registered as at end-October 2021. This represents 45.6 percent of the 1.2 million farmers targeted for 2021. With the deployment of additional electronic recording devices and increase in personnel, it is anticipated that the registration rate will reach 90 percent by end-December 2021.

 

  1. Speaker, Government engaged various actors in the agricultural value-chain with the view to understanding the binding constraints in the poultry, rice, soya and tomato sub-sectors. As a result of this engagement, a framework to provide

 

interest rate subsidy to agribusinesses in these value chains were developed to address the financing constraints of the actors.

 

  1. The interest rate subsidy intervention will grant 50 percent subsidy on Financial Institutions’ (FIs) interest charges for loans advanced to qualified agribusinesses to secure equipment and expand working capital. MoFA, in collaboration with GIRSAL and nine selected financial institutions, is working to roll out the interest rate subsidy Extensive sensitisation of value chain actors on the modalities for the interest rate subsidy is ongoing to ensure easy, timely and increased uptake of the support.

 

  1. Speaker, to boost tomato production and reduce annual imports by 50 percent by 2025, the CARES programme is facilitating the introduction of improved varieties of tomato developed jointly by the West Africa Centre for Crop Improvement (WACCI) and the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR). Government will take steps to multiply and release the new varieties on approval by the Seed Council.

 

  1. Additionally, MoFA has engaged the Soil Irrigation and Research Centre (SIREC) to undertake soil testing to guide the design of appropriate soil and nutrient management programmes to increase productivity of the local tomato

 

  1. Speaker, through the support of the CARES programme, a comprehensive strategy was developed to make information more accessible to attract youth into agriculture. The agribusiness window of the MoFA web page is being re-designed to provide information on rewarding opportunities in agriculture. This will be ready by end-March 2022.

 

  1. Speaker, with the lessons learnt from this year, and the relationships built so far, the following key activities will be completed in 2022:
    • Register additional three million farmers;
    • Extend interest rate subsides to at least 50 commercial actors in the poultry, soya, rice, and tomato value chains to provide affordable financing;
    • Collaborate with the Ghana Enterprise Agency (GEA) and the National Entrepreneurship and Innovation Programme (NEIP), to provide starter packs for youth in the poultry, rice, soya, and tomato value chains;
    • Support the development of 9,000ha in rain-fed lowland in rice growing regions for commercial This is expected to produce additional 31,500Mt of rice and also generate about 3,600 direct jobs with 40 percent being the youth;
    • Support the rehabilitation and expansion of irrigation schemes in rice growing areas to provide 1,000ha of land and produce additional 11,000Mt of rice. This is expected to generate about 1,000 direct jobs with 40 percent being the youth;

 

  • Support the production of soyabean with early generation seeds of preferred varieties which are high yielding and adaptable to growing ecologies;
  • Support the development of 25,000ha to produce 50,000Mt of soyabean grains at selected locations in the Northern and Middle Zonal Belts;
  • Continue to support seed development and multiplication of improved tomato breeder seeds by WACCI and CSIR;
  • Support the multi-locational trials and breeder seed multiplication of improved varieties;
  • Provide support to Akumadan, Tanoso, Subingya, Tono and Vea Irrigation Schemes to put 1,603ha of land under tomato production; and
  • Provide interest rate subsidy support to certified seed producers to produce 3Mt of certified tomato seeds from the newly developed improved varieties by CRI and

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, to sustain the modernisation of agriculture, Government will also pursue the following in 2022:
    • Create a Ghana Agricultural Land Information Bank (GhLIB) to provide a reliable and easily accessible land-based information platform to improve and facilitate access to land for commercial farming;
    • Develop, print, and disseminate investment related leaflets and brochures on priority commodities;
    • Sensitise and engage the youth on the opportunities within the agricultural sector; and
    • Map-out the agribusiness start-up ecosystem resources and disseminate them to the youth.

 

Promoting Tourism, Arts and Culture
  1. Speaker, based on the medium-term goals set out in the National Tourism Plan, accelerated development of tourism has been prioritised under CARES. This is to ensure investment and development of infrastructure, marketing, and supply-chain links, enhanced capacity of key tourism institutions, and improved coordination with the private sector for job creation and economic expansion.

 

  1. Specifically, the interventions are expected to: increase tourist arrivals in 2021 by 50 percent over the 2020 outcome; and by 2023 increase jobs in the tourism, arts and culture sector by 5 percent and increase the sector’s contribution to GDP by 2 percent over the 2019 figure.

 

  1. Speaker, as part of efforts to improve the quality of tourism assets in Ghana, parts of the Aburi Botanical Gardens and the Yaa Asantewaa Mausoleum in Ejisu- Besease will be upgraded. The contracts for these works have been awarded and the projects are expected to be completed by end of March 2022. The main components of Phase I of the upgrade in Aburi include works to enhance the entry and exit gates, visitor receptive facilities, washrooms, a car park, play grounds and an event centre.

 

 

  1. In addition, preparatory works, including design and procurement processes for the construction of a heritage village are underway. Stakeholder and community engagement has commenced towards the planned transformation of the Pikworo Heritage and Slave Market, the Salaga Slave Market, and four targeted

 

  1. Speaker, the following key results were achieved for the sector under CARES this year:
    • Targeted roadshows in key source markets led to increased tourism By the end of September 2021, inbound arrivals of 411,164 placed the sector on course to achieve its end-year target of 600,000. These road shows have led to some strategic partnerships, including the historic naming of a street after Ghana in Bedford-Stuyvesant (Bed-Stuy) by the Borough of Brooklyn in New York City. The number of visitors from the sub-region also grew by 13 percent against a target of 10 percent through enhanced marketing strategies.
    • Stakeholder engagements and preparatory works for the sector skills revitalisation programme is ongoing. The target is to train and certify 10,000 persons by 2023 on specific tourism and hospitality skills, including product knowledge, customer service, digital marketing, and business development. So far over 500 people, including drivers of car rental companies and taxis, have undergone training in product knowledge improvement;
    • A data centre at the Ghana Tourism Authority to enhance industry data collection and provide real-time data is also in place; and
    • The National Tourism Destination Single Window platform (NTDSWP) to automate the country’s tourism operations and enhance service delivery has been Over 300 operators have so far been placed on the platform.

 

Advancing Technological Capability
  1. Speaker, the CARES programme is promoting the accelerated advancement of Ghana’s technological capability in engineering. The priority of Government is to build the nation’s capacity to manufacture machine tools to support industrialisation and entrepreneurs for job creation and transformation. Specifically, a Foundry which is being established for the manufacture of machine tools is 95 percent complete. The construction of the Machine Tooling Centre will be completed in 2022.

 

  1. The Foundry and Machine tooling centre will be managed through a Public Private Partnership (PPP) An ongoing process to engage a private management partner will be concluded in 2022.

 

  1. The programme will supply some basic agro-processing equipment within five Additionally, the programme also targets the automobile and mining industries by producing spare-parts and developing sub-contracting capabilities to service the emerging automobile assembly industry in the country.

 

Expanding Manufacturing and Export Capacity
  1. Speaker, in alignment with Government’s 10-Point Industrialisation Agenda, accelerated expansion of Ghana’s Light Manufacturing has been prioritised under GhanaCARES to ensure rapid competitive import substitution, expanded capacity for agro-processing, increased exports, job creation, and industrialisation.

 

  1. Currently, Ghana produces about 30 percent of its pharmaceutical product requirements, therefore, Government intervention is required to reduce imports of pharmaceutical products. Consequently, upgrading existing pharmaceutical companies to Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) standards, as well as commencing works towards establishing the Bioequivalence Centre (at Noguchi) to support the local pharmaceutical manufacturing industry is a priority. The CARES programme seeks to upgrade at least one existing first tier pharmaceutical manufacturing company to achieve World Health Organisation GMP Standards to enable them enhance export capacity, particularly under AfCFTA.

 

  1. Speaker, the CARES programme also seeks to facilitate the provision and upgrade of machinery and equipment for at least 30 Tier-2 local garment manufacturing companies to enable them expand capacity to produce and export. The support will among others target companies with strong production capacity for the local market and potential for export.

 

  1. Discussions are almost concluded for the acquisition of land for the construction of a Garment Enclave at the Dawa Industrial Park. The enclave will include all amenities and facilities to boost production activities within the garment The funds allocated for this purpose will be recovered from the participating companies on a Lease Fee arrangement or on a Work and Pay basis.

 

  1. These interventions will enhance the competitiveness of garment companies, create jobs, increase supply of locally produced garments for the domestic market and position them for exports under the Africa Growth and Opportunities Act (AGOA) and the European Union (EU)

 

  1. Speaker, Government under the light manufacturing initiative, will facilitate the re-tooling and re-capitalization of some distressed but economically viable iron and steel, wood processing, and textile manufacturing companies.

 

  1. Speaker, as part of Government efforts to expand industrial capacity and facilitate exports the following key initiatives will be implemented in 2022:
    • Acceleration of Business Regulatory Reforms (including digitisation of operations at the Registrar General’s Department and licensing processes at the Ghana Investment Promotion Centre (GIPC), Ghana Free Zone Authority (GFZA), and Ghana Standard Authority (GSA));

 

  • Commence a programme to build regional industrial parks linked to technical universities;
  • Expand domestic procurement of pharmaceuticals and work with industry to facilitate production of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API); and
  • Complete the process of engaging a private sector entity to manage and operationalise the Komenda Sugar

 

Bridging the digital divide and fast-tracking digitalisation
  1. Speaker, our priority is to facilitate investment and development of communication infrastructure including integration and leveraging of data systems and platforms. Government is working towards enhancing the capacity of key institutions and strengthening coordination with the private sector for improved service delivery, business expansion and economic transformation. This is consistent with the goal of H.E. The President to bridge the digital divide and make technology a driver for our socio-economic progress.

 

  1. Speaker, Government is making significant progress towards the digitalisation drive. To date, Ghana Cards have been issued to over 11.5 million Ghanaians. The Ghana Card replaced the Tax Identification Numbers (TIN) of individuals in line with Government policy to use a unique identifier for all transactions to enhance revenue administration.

 

  1. Speaker, the expansion of digital financial platforms, including mobile money and its interoperability with the banking system, has increased financial inclusion. Government is in the process of digitising the health records of Ghanaians and creating a national digital platform for the sale of pharmaceutical products to improve healthcare delivery.

 

  1. Speaker, through GhanaCARES, Government is energising the digitalisation agenda by making funds available for a host of on-going data integration platforms and electronic information systems. The plan to unify and optimise existing data infrastructure to inform policy and revenue mobilisation is proceeding steadily.

 

  1. In addition, the drive to digitise the economy has received added impetus from the proposed adoption of the e-cedi currency by the Bank of Ghana. This will keep Ghana on the digital frontier in the coming

 

  1. Speaker, our plan to establish a comprehensive Government-wide database and Management System for all Government digital assets, was set in motion with stakeholder engagements. The outcome of the preliminary assessment will inform the next steps.

 

  1. Speaker, Government will fast-track efforts to upgrade the Kumasi, Tamale, Sunyani and Sekondi-Takoradi Regional Innovation Centres to digital centres. This upgrade is to facilitate the building of ICT capacity, provide support to start- ups to boost job creation and enhance the drive for knowledge-led socio- economic growth.

 

Local Production of Vaccines
  1. Speaker, Government is taking steps to facilitate the local production of vaccines. A draft National Vaccine Policy is being finalised and the establishment of a National Vaccine Institute to coordinate production of vaccines is underway. Aligned with the President’s vision, three local pharmaceutical firms have already expressed interest. Government intends to support interested firms to secure partners to fill-in technological and capacity gaps as well as provide support towards securing licenses.

 

  1. Speaker, all these initiatives when completed will not only position the nation to meet its vaccine needs but also supply neighbouring countries with vaccines. Together with the already advancing Pharmaceutical Hub programme under the CARES, Government is permanently addressing possible risks to future disruptions and joining the supply chain for the sub-region.

 

  1. Speaker, Agenda-111 dubbed “the gateway to enhanced healthcare in Ghana”, which was launched by H.E The President on Tuesday, 17th August, 2021 at Trede, Atwima Kwanwonma District in Ashanti Region is a bold initiative of the Government to provide contemporary healthcare for Ghanaians.

 

  1. The goal of Agenda-111 is to ensure that all Ghanaians have access to high quality healthcare services. In conjunction with the National Health Insurance Scheme, the Agenda-111 will boost healthcare infrastructure and financial access to healthcare as well as achieve quality Universal Health Coverage by the year

 

  1. Speaker, preparatory activities including stakeholder engagements have been completed for all the district hospitals except for eight sites in the Accra Metropolis for construction to commence. Procurement processes are underway for the construction of the regional hospitals and the Accra Psychiatric Hospital. The Agenda-111 is expected to be completed by end 2023.

 

Repositioning the Financial Sector
  1. Speaker, the CARES programme seeks to deepen access to finance for large corporates, SMEs and rural farmers through establishing the Development Bank, transformation of GAT to a permanent company, strengthening the Commodity Exchange (GCX) and the scaling up of Home Ownership Funds. Additionally, the GhanaCares programme is supporting our effort to establish an International

 

Financial Services Centre (IFSC) in Ghana. The IFSC will position Ghana as a regional headquarters for capital inflows to both Ghana and our regional peers. The Centre is modelled to create the right legal and business environment to attract global pension funds, asset managers, stock exchanges, trustees, and insurance firms among others.

 

  1. Speaker, Government has resourced the Ghana Commodity Exchange (GCX) to implement its strategic plan. Pursuant to this, the GCX and Venture Capital Trust Fund (VCTF) have jointly set-up an Aggregation and Entrepreneurship Development Fund to provide funding for commodity aggregators to buy produce from smallholder farmers through the GCX. In 2022, Government will focus on promoting the sale of cocoa and gold on the GCX platform.

 

  1. Over 1,200 market actors comprising out-grower networks, Farmer-Based Organisations, aggregators and farmers in the northern and southern sectors were engaged and trained on the fund application and selection

 

  1. Speaker, the CARES programme is also supporting GCX to set up a settlement Guarantee Fund to ensure payment of proceeds of sale to depositors on the GCX platform, in the event of a default in settlement. The administrative rules for setting up the Fund was approved by the Securities and Exchange Commission. It is expected that this Guarantee Fund will be operationalised by the end of first- quarter, 2022.

 

  1. The GCX is currently supporting 15 commercial farmers in the Northern, North East and Upper East Regions to produce and trade in about 8,000Mt of rice, 10,000Mt of soyabeans and 14,000Mt of

 

  1. Speaker, Government operationalised the CARES Guarantee Scheme in 2021, as part of its effort to support businesses to weather the effects of COVID-19. The scheme managed by GIRSAL provides guarantees to encourage banks to lend to or restructure loans for large businesses (100 or more employees) that have either been adversely affected or have discovered new business opportunities as a result of COVID-19. The scheme complements the CAPBUSS programme launched by Government in 2020 to support MSMEs (i.e. businesses with less than 100 employees). GIRSAL has signed agreements with eight institutions for the implementation of the CARES Guarantee Scheme. Guarantees have been provided to three companies in the aviation, hospitality and transport sectors to enable them access bank loans totalling GH¢89.7 million in 2021.

 

Development Bank Ghana
  1. Speaker, Government is happy to announce the successful set-up and operationalisation of the Development Bank Ghana (DBG). The DBG has received its operational license from the Bank of Ghana. The central bank has also conducted its due diligence and approved DBG’s Governing Board and key Management Personnel. DBG will support the private sector to ease the constraints of long-term credit for growth and expansion.

 

  1. Government’s intention in establishing the DBG is very clear; to provide a strong well-capitalised institution to ensure that private sector credit is enhanced on a scale that will make businesses expand, employ more people and be more competitive in the region especially within the AfCTA

 

  1. Speaker, Government has committed to capitalising DBG with US$250 million, of which US$200 million has already been paid. In addition, through the effort of Government a total financing package of around US$550 million has been lined up for DBG from development partners. It is expected that DBG will leverage these resources to attract additional local and international capital for private sector growth and job creation.

 

  1. DBG is primed to ease the constraint of long-term financing at competitive rates for entrepreneurs in the manufacturing, agriculture, agro-processing, ICT, and housing subsectors to propel economic growth, create jobs and improve domestic revenue mobilisation. With the recent restructuring of the sector, the financial ecosystem has been repositioned with significant depth and scope to extend the needed support to businesses.

 

National Homeownership Fund
  1. Speaker, the linkage between economic recovery and the housing sector is widely acknowledged. Government has, therefore, prioritised the sector for strategic support in 2022. Based on the success of a pilot, the National Homeownership Fund working in partnership with three universal banks, the Rent to Own Scheme of the Affordable Real Estate Investment Trust, as well as GCB Capital to scale up delivery of affordable housing in Ghana.

 

  1. To scale up this initiative, Government commenced engagements with Participating Financial Institutions (PFIs) to promote residential rent-to-own schemes and to support the development of a private sector mortgage refinancing institution. With the support of CARES, the National Homeownership Fund (NHF) is facilitating the use of innovative products to tap into pension and other long-term funds to support homeownership in

 

  1. Speaker, in 2022, Government will accelerate the implementation of this strategy by focusing on these key components:

 

  • A blended finance concept to lower mortgage lending and rental rates to end- consumers, while protecting the gains to PFIs and investors without distorting the market;
  • Development of a national demand database that registers and pre-screens first time homeowners for mortgages and residential rental schemes with PFIs; and
  • Setting up a Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) with Banks. The SPV will raise long term funds from Pension funds and other long-term investment assets to support the PFIs and provide refinancing mechanisms to buy mortgages from the PFIs or package the loans into mortgage-backed securities (MBS) that will be sold to investors. This will make the secondary mortgage market more liquid and help lower the interest rates paid by homeowners and other mortgage

 

  1. The NHF will be independently and professionally managed to ensure financial sustainability while effectively fulfilling its mandate.

 

International Financial Services Centre (IFSC)
  1. Speaker, Government has established a more resilient financial ecosystem to meet the needs of the private sector. This has paved the way for the setting up of the International Financial Services Centre (IFSC) to leverage regional and global financial resources.

 

  1. Speaker, with the support of GhanaCARES and development partners, procurement processes for the development of a business plan as well as the legal and regulatory framework for the IFSC will be concluded by end-March, 2022.

 

Transformation of Ghana Amalgamated Trust (GAT) into a Permanent Company
  1. Speaker, the revitalised financial sector will be complemented with other institutional innovations to strengthen Ghanaian businesses. In this regard, there is the need for a dedicated Government-backed private equity company with the ability to raise independent and patient capital from the capital markets, and other alternative sources for the transformation of our local companies as practiced elsewhere.

 

  1. Speaker, with the experience and success of the Ghana Amalgamated Trust Plc (GAT) in transforming the operations of its investee banks since 2018, Government in 2022, will leverage the GAT model to create a more resilient institution to hold equity investments in the financial and non-financial sectors.

 

  1. The new GAT will invest:
    • To further strengthen the financial sector post COVID-19;

 

  • In fintech companies to accelerate to growth of digital lending to support SMEs; and
  • To restructure mainly large companies that were affected by COVID-19 e. hospitality, transport and manufacturing sectors.

 

  1. This will support the expansion of medium to large companies and enable them take advantage of the Africa Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA). It will also complement the work of the Venture Capital Trust Fund (VCTF) and the National Home Ownership

 

  1. Speaker, the new GAT will partner DBG to provide patient capital and support the expansion of medium scale enterprises to build regional and global competitive Ghanaian companies.

 

Domestic Credit Rating Agency (DCRA)
  1. Speaker, Government is facilitating the establishment of a Domestic Credit Rating Agency (DCRA) in Ghana to reduce information asymmetry between market participants (borrowers, lenders, and regulators), and to promote an improved credit-culture, risk-based lending, and equitable pricing of debt instruments. This will facilitate investment decisions by helping investors obtain relevant information to achieve a balance in the risk return trade-off and assist firms to access capital. The DCRA will build an active rating system, enable lower interest rate as a reward for good behaviour, and improve access to finance for businesses. The DCRA will be operational by June 2022.

 

Portfolio shift in favour of SMEs
  1. Speaker, the Banking Industry has collectively decided to accelerate their portfolio allocation to qualifying SMEs to help uplift their contribution to economic growth and fast track our pace to aggressive economic recovery post COVID-19. To achieve this noble objective, banks will over the next three years increase their lending to qualifying SMEs by between GH¢2.5 billion and GH¢5 billion thereby increasing industry SME portfolio from approximately GH¢7.4 billion to approximately GH¢12.3 billion. Over the same period, banks will review internal processes and procedures to facilitate and accommodate the planned growth in the SME portfolio.

 

Skills Development Programme
  1. In addition, the banking industry will collectively engage in skills development programmes for at least 150,000 young graduates and youth entrepreneurs over the next three years by engaging in activities to:
    • identify skill gaps in young graduates and youthpreneurs;
    • develop and embed these skills; and

 

  • expose the youth to entrepreneurship opportunities by matching them to SME customers for the furtherance of their abilities to create and sustain jobs in

 

  1. The banking industry will, therefore, spend a total of GH¢75 million over the next three years on skills development programmes for young graduates and

 

Addressing the Youth Employment and Skills Challenge
  1. Speaker, in addition to the private sector’s contribution to job creation, Government has over the last five years employed a significant number of young Ghanaians into the public sector particularly in the health, education and security sectors. Furthermore, Government through special programmes such as NEIP, NABCo, National Afforestation Programme and GEA (formally NBSSI) has created significant job opportunities for the youth and MSMEs.

 

  1. Specifically, Government took a bold and decisive decision to support ghanaian youth through the establishment of the National Entrepreneurial and Innovation Programme (NEIP) and the Nation Builders Corps (NABCo). NABCo was initiated to support 100,000 graduates to acquire relevant workplace skills and So far over 35,000 NABCo trainees have secured permanent jobs.

 

  1. Speaker, in spite of this, youth unemployment persists. This challenge has been further exacerbated by the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has negatively affected businesses and narrowed job openings in the private sector significantly.

 

  1. These are the sobering facts:
    • Youth unemployment is estimated at 6 percent, and in addition 50 percent of Ghanaian youth are underemployed;
    • Public sector job openings are largely capped due to fiscal constraints;
    • Around 100,000 students graduate from accredited tertiary institutions annually, with more than 50 percent of them enrolled in courses with limited or no job growth potential;
    • Ghanaian employers generally complain that they find it difficult to fill positions due to misalignments between qualifications and required skills; and
    • The Government and private sector will need to expand job openings by about 80 percent over the next 8 years to absorb the 10.5 million youthful Ghanaians.

 

  1. Speaker, existing alongside these disconcerting facts are the following opportunities:
    • Close to 4.3 million jobs will require digital skills in Ghana by the end of this decade;

 

  • Very few educated youth are engaged in agriculture with the main barriers to entry being finance, land acquisition, farm management skills, and appropriate mechanisation;
  • Enormous potential exists for jobs in the tomato, rice, and poultry value chains, among others; and
  • Artisanal skills will be strengthened, enhanced and given a regional orientation to optimise the prospects of AfCFTA.

 

YouStart Initiative
  1. Speaker, this understanding of the youth employment challenge, as well as extensive consultations with stakeholders including youth associations and educational institutions across the country, have led to the development of the YouStart initiative as a key vehicle to create 1 million jobs in 3 years under the GhanaCARES programme.

 

  1. Speaker, YouStart is the vehicle for supporting young entrepreneurs to gain access to capital, training, technical skills and mentoring to enable them launch and operate their own businesses.

 

Implementing Partners of the YouStart Initiative

  1. Speaker, the Ghana Enterprises Agency (GEA), the National Entrepreneurship and Innovation Programme (NEIP), and partner financial institutions, will serve as the implementing arms of YouStart. Entrepreneurs will be able to apply for support through a dedicated YouStart online portal. NEIP will also engage our Faith-Based Organisations as partners for the delivery of essential artisanal skills.

 

  1. Speaker, YouStart will provide our youth with the following:
    • Training: Skills   Development,   Entrepreneurial   Support   and                 Business Advisory service provision;
    • Funding: Access to Competitive Credit and Starter Packs;
    • Enterprise Promotion: Mentoring and Access to Markets including Portals to facilitate “digital linkages” between youth-led enterprises and other businesses and relevant Government

 

YouStart Products

  1. Speaker, YouStart will support youth-led enterprises with the following products:
    • Soft loans of up to GH¢50,000 to help start-ups (in particular by young graduates and school leavers) and small businesses to expand;
    • Starter packs (Soft loans tied to equipment acquisition) of up to GH¢50,000 for individuals and GH¢100,000 for associations and groups;
    • A standardised loan package of between GH¢100,000 to GH¢400,000 at concessional rates for SMEs from financial institutions;

 

  1. Speaker, the YouStart initiative aims to support the youth to develop commercially viable businesses. To this end YouStart is designed to instill proper commercial orientation in the beneficiaries. This will include financial institutions determining the credit metrics and GEA and NEIP providing training support especially for the standardised SME loans.

 

  1. Mr Speaker, YouStart dovetails into our overall ambitious private sector growth strategy, anchored on a revitalised financial sector, establishment of Development Bank Ghana, and converting the Ghana Amalgamated Trust (GAT) into a permanent investment vehicle. The objective is to raise long-term capital to provide equity investments to strengthen financial institutions, and restructure companies in the hospitality, education, and export-oriented industries that were devastated by COVID-19. YouStart will be operational by March

 

  1. Government is also engaging financial institutions and development partners to support our job creation drive for the youth. All these interventions will create a robust financing eco-system capable of supporting businesses from the early to mature stage.

 

  1. Government encourages the beneficiaries of NABCo and all other youth to take advantage of the opportunities YouStart

 

National Unemployment Insurance Scheme (NUIS)
  1. Speaker, the establishment of the National Unemployment Insurance Scheme (NUIS) and the Training/Retraining Programme is another initiative under the GhanaCARES programme. Since its announcement in the 2020 Mid-Year Budget Review, Government has held a series of engagements with key stakeholders on the design and execution of a National Unemployment Insurance Scheme.

 

  1. The NUIS has the objective of cushioning workers who become unemployed as a result of an economic shock such as COVID-19 pandemic and also serve as a mitigating measure for unexpected future events that may disrupt employment. The training/retraining programme is aimed at preserving and upgrading the human capital and skills of the current cohort of workers who lost their employment because of the pandemic. This programme is intended to facilitate their re-entry into productive employment at higher levels of

 

  1. Speaker, Government together with Social Partners, piloted the training and retraining programme for workers in the tourism, hospitality and the private education sectors. The processes for identification of relevant modules and selection of beneficiaries for the training and retraining programme were completed. The first phase of the programme is expected to be rolled out across the country as soon as the necessary institutional arrangements are finalised.

 

  1. Speaker, in 2022, relevant stakeholders and technical experts, will be engaged to pave the way for the passage of a NUIS Bill to lay the framework and foundation for the operationalisation of the scheme.

 

National Alternative Employment and Livelihood Programme in Mining Sector
  1. Speaker, illegal mining (Galamsey) has caused grave destruction of our natural environment and continues to pose a threat to our very survival as a people and remains a national security issue. Decades of weak regulatory regimes and enforcement have allowed inappropriate mining activities to dominate the small-scale mining sub-sector.

 

  1. E. The President took a bold decision which led to the suspension of small- scale mining operations and the establishment of an Inter-Ministerial Committee on Illegal Mining (IMCIM). IMCIM took several actions to stamp out illegal mining and sanitise the small-scale mining sub-sector through strengthening the regulatory framework and enhancing the capacity of implementing agencies to discharge their mandate effectively.

 

  1. Speaker, a national and regional dialogue on Small Scale Mining (Galamsey) was organised which led to the Operation Halt II programme to crack down on illegal mining. Preliminary data gathered by the Minerals Commission indicate that Operation Halt II made some positive impact on the forest reserves and the river bodies. However, the Operation affected the livelihoods of a little over 1,000,000 people in mining communities across five regions of Ghana – Ashanti, Central, Eastern, Western, and Western North Regions. The affected people include small-scale miners, fuel suppliers, hoteliers, metal fabricators, transport operators, caterers, traders and farmers among others.

 

  1. Speaker, the Government through the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources during the 2021 Mid-year Budget Review, revealed plans to provide alternative employment and livelihood for miners who were displaced as a result of the ongoing efforts by Government to sanitise the mining industry of any illegal activities.

 

  1. Consequently, the National Alternative Employment and Livelihood Programme (NAELP) which is anchored on six main interventions (ie the National Land Reclamation and Re-afforestation, Agriculture & Agro-processing, Apprenticeship, Skills Training & Entrepreneurship, Responsible, Viable & Sustainable Community Mining, Mine Support Services, and Community Enhancement Projects) was developed and launched by the President.

 

  1. Speaker, the community mining scheme in particular, which forms the main fulcrum around which the Government seeks to organise responsible, viable and

 

sustainable community mining was rolled out. So far five community mining schemes, with 20 concessions, have been launched in Mbaampehia in the Ahanta West Municipality, Kwabre in the Jomoro Municipality, Adukrom in the Ahafo Ano South-East District, Jacobu in the Amansie Central District, and Akyim Abaam in the Kwaebibrim District. These five schemes, have the capacity to employ about 26,300 people in direct and indirect employment. A total of 18 schemes with 100 concessions will be launched by the end of 2021.

 

  1. In 2022, it is estimated that a total of 100 well regulated, responsible, environmentally sound community mining schemes will be rolled out across the This will create about 220,000 jobs. The schemes will have, among others, functioning offices, proper database of miners, mining environmental officers on site, changing rooms for miners and sick bays.

 

  1. Additionally, Government will implement the National Land Reclamation and Re- afforestation, Mine Support Services and Community Enhancement components of the

 

  1. The National Land Reclamation and Re-afforestation component of the programme will lead to the reclamation and re-afforestation of 1,000 hectares of degraded lands in the five regions covered by the project. This is expected to create additional 100,000 jobs for the youth.

 

Minerals Income Investment Fund (MIIF)
  1. Speaker, the Minerals Income Investment Fund (MIIF) was established to hold and manage the equity interests of the country in mining companies, receive revenues accruing from mineral royalties, and provide for the management and investment of the assets of the Fund.

 

  1. Speaker, in order to increase the presence of wholly owned Ghanaian companies in the large-scale and mid-tier areas of the mining sub-sector, MIIF is seeking to develop local capacity in the Ghanaian mining sector by providing technical support and long-term capital to viable and licensed small-scale miners and local mining operators. This initiative is termed the MIIF Small Scale Mining Incubation Programme. The principal objective of the MIIF incubation programme is to help transform wholly owned Ghanaian Small-Scale mining companies into Mid-Tier to Large-Scale companies.

 

  1. The “Small Scale Mining Incubation Programme” of MIIF will have three modules: Direct Equity Participation, Debt through Risk Participations with selected Banks, and Lease Arrangements for mining equipment. The Programme will commence with a pilot of three Ghanaian-owned small-scale companies.

 

  1. Speaker, the successful implementation of this programme will have direct benefits for small-scale miners and mining communities. Climate risk assessments will be embedded in the acceptance criteria for the MIIF initiative to reduce environmental degradation. This initiative will in the long term improve the entire value chain and create jobs in the mining community.

 

  1. An amount of GH¢354 million is to be earmarked by MIIF for the Small Scale Mining Incubation Programme over a period of 24 months beginning 1st February 2022 as the initial pilot. Up to 30 percent of the allocation will be earmarked for the provision of equity capital to selected small-scale mining companies under an acceptance criterion which will include strict environmental

 

  1. The remaining amount will be deployed for the Debt Support and Leasing Arrangements for mining equipment. MIIF will explore de-risking arrangements through methods such as partial guarantees, risk participations with local banks that provide short-term funding needs and contract

 

  1. Speaker, the Mineral Income Investment Fund also intends to list up to 49 percent of its 100 percent owned subsidiary, Agyapa Royalties Ltd. The funds raised will be used to support Government’s development efforts, covering education, road infrastructure, community mining and health infrastructure.

 

  1. Speaker, Agyapa Royalties was incorporated in line with Section 3(a) of the MIIF Act, 2018 (Act 978) as amended by the Minerals Income Investment Fund (Amendment) Act, 2020 (Act 1024), which allows the Fund to create and hold equity interests in a Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) in any jurisdiction in furtherance of its objects. Agyapa Royalties was incorporated in Bailiwick of Jersey to operate as a publicly-traded pure gold royalties company with the Fund intending to assign a portion of its gold royalties to the SPV.

 

  1. Speaker, Government engaged and listened to stakeholders across board and made amendments to the agreements to capture their concerns. The revised agreements will be presented to Parliament for review and approval during the 1st quarter of 2022.

 

Climate Action and Sustainable Transition to a Low Carbon Economy
  1. Speaker, the COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant adverse effect on our economy and public finances. However, our post COVID-19 economic recovery agenda provides an opportunity to build back better through innovation and more aggressive pursuit of green growth.

 

  1. In this regard, Government has put in place climate change interventions to leverage the drive towards a green transition in a manner that promotes

 

sustainable growth, financial and fiscal stability, increased employment, and reduced inequality. Ghana’s response to climate change will therefore play a key role in achieving our transformation agenda, and medium to long-term national development objectives.

 

  1. Speaker, having launched our updated Nationally Determined Contributions at the recently ended COP 26, Ghana has reiterated its readiness to leverage its natural resources to fund a sustainable transition to a low carbon economy. This will be done by facilitating private sector participation in low carbon activities in a manner that generates more jobs for Ghanaians and improves our general wellbeing.

 

  1. Beyond emission reduction through natural infrastructure, Government also intends to invest in the use of technology, and will, in partnership with the private sector, invest in the assembly and integration of electric

 

  1. Government is also investing in more forest conservation and sustainable land use programmes to provide opportunities for local entrepreneurship and job creation involving youth and women as well as strengthening small and medium scale enterprises (SMEs).

 

Nationally Determined Contributions
  1. Speaker, Ghana is a party to the Paris Agreement which aims to strengthen global response to the threat of global warming and climate change. The Agreement requires all parties to put forward their best efforts through Nationally Determined Contributions and outline strategies to reduce national emissions and adapt to the impact of climate change.

 

  1. Mr Speaker, Ghana’s updated Nationally Determined Contributions define government’s response to climate change, highlighting policies, actions and targets for low carbon The updated Nationally Determined Contributions, are aligned with national policies and backed by concrete programmes that can be implemented by both the public and private sector as well as CSOs.

 

  1. Speaker, as part of global efforts to keep global temperature increases well below 2 degrees Celsius compared to preindustrial levels and avoid the irreversible consequences of climate change on vulnerable communities, Ghana has developed 19 policy measures in 10 priority areas to achieve the Nationally Determined Contributions goals in the next decade (2020-2030). Implementation of these policy measures are expected to generate an absolute greenhouse gas emission reduction of 64 MtCO2e, and create about one million green jobs over the period.

 

  1. Speaker, to achieve the ambitious climate change targets, Ghana requires a total of US$9.3 billion in investments to implement the 47 Nationally Determined Contributions programmes from 2021 to 2030. Out of this amount, US$3.9 billion will be required to implement the 16 unconditional programmes over the next 10 years. The remaining US$5.4 billion for the 31 conditional Nationally Determined Contributions programmes will be mobilised from public, international, and private sector sources as well as climate markets.

 

  1. Speaker, H.E. The President, in his address at the United Nations Convention on Climate Change (COP26), in Glasgow on Tuesday, 2nd November 2021, acknowledged the important effects of climate change and the urgent need to combat it. He, however, noted that even though Africa was the lowest contributor to carbon emissions, approximately 4 percent of global emissions, the continent was most susceptible to the effects of climate change because our economies are largely agrarian and resource driven.

 

  1. E. The President therefore, called for an approach to dealing with climate change that balances the social, economic and environmental needs of countries in order to ensure that poorer countries are supported with financial resources to be able to develop in a climate responsible manner.

 

  1. Mr Speaker, the mobilisation of sufficient financial resources is critical to ensure that Ghana is able to address the challenges associated with the effort to build a climate resilient economy. Consequently, Ghana is exploring more results based climate financing options, including carbon markets and climate impact

 

Green Climate Fund (GCF)
  1. Speaker, Ghana has submitted 18 proposals to seek funding from the Green Climate Fund (GCF) and co-financiers. Nine proposals were approved, totalling US$106.9 million. Two key projects approved by the GCF are the Ghana Shea Landscape Emission Reduction Project (GSLERP) and the Affirmative Finance Action for Women in Africa (AFAWA).

 

  1. Speaker, the GSLERP commenced with an approved amount of US$30.1 million from the GCF. The project aims to significantly reduce emissions from deforestation on the shea landscape and restore degraded savannah forests as well as improve livelihoods through enhanced ecosystem services.

 

  1. Speaker, Shea is a major source of livelihood in Northern Ghana and provides critical economic support for women. Shea Landscapes are important sources of carbon storage, and can improve adaptive capacities by making ecosystems more resilient. The project will enhance the capacity of susceptible groups, including women, to sustainably utilise land resources and enable value addition in the utilisation of forest resources.

 

 

  1. Additionally, the project will contribute to a 30-50 percent increase in income for 20,000 women collectors organised into It also supports implementation of the National REDD+ Strategy, Ghana’s Nationally Determined Contributions and other Government policies to reduce deforestation and forest degradation.

 

  1. Speaker, although women carry out about 70 percent of agricultural activities in Ghana, they also lack access to formal financing channels. In response to this phenomenon, Government will implement the programme on Affirmative Finance Action for Women in Africa (AFAWA) with the objective of empowering women groups in the most vulnerable agro-ecological zones through the provision of Technical Assistance (TA) and Lines of Credit (LoC) to enable them participate in low-emission Climate Resilient Agricultural (CRA) practices in Ghana.

 

  1. AFAWA is an on-lending programme that will provide credit lines to local commercial These loans exclusively target Micro, Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (MSMEs) and farmer-based associations led by women to support low-emissions and climate-resilient agricultural practices.

 

Coalition of Finance Ministers for Climate Action
  1. Speaker, in recognising the risks posed by climate change, and how proactive action could unlock trillions in investments and create millions of jobs, Ghana joined the Coalition of Finance Ministers for Climate Action to facilitate stepped- up engagement of Ministries of Finance and the deployment of policy instruments to accelerate the transition to low carbon economies while supporting sustainable and inclusive growth.

 

  1. By joining the coalition, Ghana will receive support to mobilise and align the finance needed to implement the national climate action plans, establish best practices to support climate budgeting and strategies for green investments and procurement, and factor climate risks and vulnerabilities into economic

 

Carbon Markets
  1. Speaker, the Government of Ghana is also exploring alternative climate investment options to implement climate actions geared towards the achievement of the Ghana-Nationally Determined Contributions.

 

  1. A total of 24 million tonnes of carbon emissions out of a target of 64 million tonnes are available for carbon market Government has successfully put in place the critical policies and regulatory arrangements that will enable Ghana to participate in global carbon markets. This paves the way for both local and international private sector investors and project developers to either independently or with the government, leverage this unique opportunity to trade

 

carbon with countries and corporations with ambitious net zero targets over the next nine years.

 

  1. Based on this, the Government of Switzerland accepted Ghana’s request to pilot climate change mitigation activities under Article 2 of Internationally Transferred Mitigation Outcomes (ITMOs).

 

  1. Speaker, in November 2020, the Governments of Ghana and Switzerland signed a Bilateral Agreement which sets the framework conditions for the implementation of Article 6 of the Paris Agreement. In line with this agreement, Ghana will receive funding from Switzerland to leverage finance and stimulate investment in green friendly projects that will contribute to achieving our Nationally Determined Contributions and SDGs, in exchange for two million tonnes of carbon emission reduction credits.

 

  1. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and KLIK Foundation (private sector partner for the Switzerland Government on ITMOs) have identified Solar Photovoltaic Systems, Landfill Gas, Cook Stoves and Biomass Pellets as areas in Ghana to be developed into mitigation programmes to achieve the objectives of the Bilateral Agreement.

 

  1. Speaker, this agreement will open the doors for commercial projects and empower national businesses to drive climate action in the country. The project will be named the National Clean Energy Access Programme (NCEP).

 

Climate Public Expenditure Institutional Review
  1. Speaker, Government conducted a 2nd Climate Public Expenditure Institutional Review (CPEIR) for Ghana in 2021.The objective of the review was to provide comprehensive data on climate relevant interventions and expenditure in the budget to provide a better understanding of publicly funded climate change actions to inform government policy.

 

  1. Speaker, the study indicated that over the last five years (2015-2020) Ghana spent an amount of GH¢14.5 billion on various climate change interventions. This constituted an average of 3.94 percent of total expenditure. Key ministries involved in climate change interventions (i.e. the Ministries of Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation, Sanitation and Water Resources, Fisheries and Aquaculture Development, Lands and Natural Resources, Gender, Children and Social Protection) committed more than 30 percent of total expenditures to climate change. This is an indication of Government readiness to address the climate change issues.

 

Forest Protection
  1. Speaker, Ghana is pursuing and implementing an aggressive afforestation programme and projects aimed at restoring lost forest cover. In this regard, Government is embarking on programmes to reclaim our degraded lands to ensure the sustainable protection, management, production and development of forest and wildlife resources. These include the Ghana REDD+, National Afforestation Programme and the Forest Investment Programme which seeks to provide alternative livelihoods and reduce dependency on forest resources.

 

  1. In June 2021, to avert the challenge of deforestation and forest degradation, E The President led the entire country to plant over seven million trees which was far above the five million targeted under the Green Ghana Project, as part of the National Forest Plantation Development Programme.

 

  1. Ghana signed a Letter of Intent (LOI) during the COP26 in Glasgow on 4th November, 2021, to reduce deforestation, with Emergent, a US non-profit organisation, under the Lowering Emissions by Accelerating Forest Finance (LEAF) Coalition. Ghana is among the first five countries and the only African country to sign onto the Coalition. The other countries are Costa Rica, Ecuador, Nepal and

 

  1. Speaker, LEAF is a voluntary global coalition that is made up of the private sector and governments including Norway, UK and USA which are collaborating to finance tropical forest conservation to assist in achieving the objective of the Paris Agreement by keeping global average temperature below 2.0 degrees as envisioned by the Paris Agreement.

 

E-Mobility
  1. Speaker, Ghana is developing a proposal for the adoption of E-Mobility in the transport sector to address the high levels of Green House Gas (GHG) and air pollution associated with the sector. Road transport alone contributes 45.4 percent of total fuel combustion emissions and accounts for 13 percent of the overall national GHG emissions. The adoption of E-Mobility will promote sustainable intra-city transport services as one of the priority mitigation actions in Ghana’s Nationally Determined Contributions.

 

  1. Speaker, the introduction of this new system will support Government’s effort to provide transport services in an environmentally friendly and sustainable manner. The outcome of this project will contribute to modernising the existing public urban transportation system. The expected emission savings from investing in Battery Electric Buses (BEB) will contribute to Ghana’s emission reduction commitment in the Nationally Determined Contributions.

 

  1. Speaker, the Drive Electric Initiative (DEI) for public and private transportation of goods and services has been launched. This is a major climate friendly initiative by government to reduce exhaust gas emission and steer the economy towards a sustainable low carbon pathway.

 

Renewable Energy
  1. Mr Speaker, renewable energy is gaining prominence in the generation mix strategy and government is committed to achieving 10 percent contribution of renewable energy by 2030. To this end, the updated Gh-NDC seeks to provide mini-grids as part of the National Electrification Scheme to electrify island communities and off-grid Feasibility studies have been completed for about 100 island and lakeside communities for mini-grid electrification.

 

SECTION SIX: SECTORAL DEVELOPMENT AND OUTLOOK

 

Introduction
  1. Speaker, the year 2022 marks the transition from Ghana’s Medium-Term National Development Policy Framework 2018-2021 to the Medium-Term National Development Policy Framework (MTNDPF) 2022-2025. The Framework, which is informed by the Long Term National Development Framework ([email protected]), Coordinated Programme of Economic and Social Development Policies (2017-2024), Ghana Beyond Aid Agenda and Strategy, Ghana COVID-19 Alleviation and Revitalisation of Enterprises Support Programme (GhanaCARES), serves as the basis for the preparation and implementation of development plans of MDAs, MMDAs and RCCs as stipulated in the National Development Planning Regulations, 2016 (L.I. 2232). The Framework also seeks to attain the objectives and targets arising from the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of UN Agenda 2030 and those of African Union Agenda 2063.

 

  1. This section, therefore, highlights the performance of the sectors in 2021 with regard to the implementation of the MTNDPF 2018-2021. The section also provides the outlook for 2022 which includes ongoing programmes initiated under MTNDPF 2018-2021 and spilling over into 2022, as well as new programmes envisaged under the MTNDPF 2022-2025. It is organised around the broad sectors – Administration, Economic, Infrastructure, Social and Public Safety, as well as by MDA Budget Programmes, as outlined in the Programme Based Budget (PBB)

 

MDA Sector Performance and Outlook Administration Sector

Introduction

  1. The main focus of the Administration Sector is to ensure effective democratic governance, public financial management, local governance administration, public accountability, public policy management, as well as good international relations, development communications, and civil society

 

  1. The programmes in this sector aim to achieve the SDGs 1,3,4,6,8,10,12,16, and 17, and Africa Union (AU) Agenda 2063 Goals 2,11,12,13,15,19 and

 

OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT MACHINERY

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Management and Administration Programme
  1. Speaker, the Office of Government Machinery continued to provide administrative and technical services to the Presidency and other arms of Government.

 

  1. The Cabinet Secretariat organised 15 meetings and two Cabinet retreats. Forty- Eight Cabinet memos were received, while 56 Cabinet decisions and reports were produced, out of which 45 were sent to Parliament as at September 2021. In 2022, the Cabinet Secretariat will organise four Cabinet retreats, 24 Cabinet meetings, produce about 60 Cabinet memos and submit 50 decisions to Parliament for consideration and

 

  1. The State Protocol Department assisted in the organisation and hosting of the Heads of State for the Emergency ECOWAS Summit held on 30th May, 2021, and the 59th ECOWAS Summit held on 19th June, The Department also assisted in the hosting of an extraordinary ECOWAS Summit on the Guinea situation on 16th September, 2021 which was attended by the Presidents of Burkina Faso, Cote d’Ivoire, Guinea Bissau, Liberia, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal and Togo.

 

Infrastructure for Poverty Eradication Programme
  1. Speaker, since the programme was initiated in 2018, a total of 730 out of the 1,000 community-based mechanised water systems have been completed. A total of 80 were completed in 2021 and the rest are scheduled for completion in 2022.

 

  1. Under the “Toilet for All” programme, which aims to reduce the incidence of open defecation, 767 out of the targeted one thousand 10-seater water closet toilets have been completed, 167 of which were completed in 2021. The remaining are expected to be completed in 2022.

 

  1. Speaker, with regard to the “One Village One Dam” Initiative which aims to support all-year-round farming, 507 small earth dams out of the 560 targeted have been completed. Eighty of the dams were completed this year. In addition, riprapping of the upstream slopes of the completed dams are currently on-going to increase the lifespan and safety of the dams.

 

  1. All the 50 rural markets targeted under the agriculture component of IPEP have been completed. The first phase of the Mankessim market, which includes the construction of a 780 metre storm drain to protect the market and its environs from periodic flooding, has been completed. The second phase has begun and work is progressing Furthermore, 451 additional constituency projects

 

which cut across all sectors such as health, education, agriculture, roads and security have been completed and are in use by the beneficiary communities.

 

  1. Speaker, in keeping with its commitment to accelerate the eradication of poverty and address inequalities, Government will continue to support the delivery of projects under IPEP and see to their successful completion.

 

The National Identification Authority
  1. Speaker, the Authority enrolled 15,656,160 Ghanaians on the National Identity Register (NIR), out of which 11,648,391 Ghanaians aged 15 years and above were issued with Ghana Cards as at 30th September, 2021. A total of 163,695 foreigners were also enrolled on the NIR and issued with Non-Citizen Identity Cards.

 

  1. The National Identification Authority will continue with the provision of Identity Verification Services for selected stakeholders including SSNIT, NHIA, DVLA, GRA, the banks and telecommunications companies. This consists of integration of normal operations to benefit from online verification from the NIR, and the provision of offline devices or match-on cards. Offline verification will utilise Android devices for match-on

 

  1. The Authority will open permanent offices to continue with the provision of the following registration services:
    • Registration of all citizens from birth free of charge;
    • Distribution of backlog cards;
    • Registration of all foreigners legally and permanently resident in Ghana at a fee;
    • Replacement of lost or damaged cards for all applicants at a fee;
    • Updating of personal records or data in the NIR at no fee;
    • Provision of premium registration services for Ghanaians at a fee per head;
    • Provision of institutional registration services for Ghanaians at a fee;
    • Provision of special home services for Ghanaians at a fee;
    • Commencement of biometric verification services to User Agencies and other interested parties;
    • Commencement of registration of children less than 15 years in schools, communities, market centres, birthing centres, among others in all districts;
    • Commencement of registration of Ghanaian citizens abroad; and
    • Establishment of a registration system for refugees and persons of concern in Ghana’s refugee

 

Institutional Development Programme
  1. Speaker, under the online scholarships application process, the Government Scholarships Secretariat awarded local scholarships to a total of 45,000 tertiary students and 1,600 training college students, while 560 students were awarded

 

foreign scholarships. Payments for tuition fees and allowances to scholarship beneficiaries under the various scholarship schemes for the 2020/2021 academic year are ongoing. In 2022, the decentralised District Level Local Tertiary Scholarship Scheme will award scholarships to 31,000 students across the country.

 

  1. The Scholarships Secretariat will also make payments to 27,252 public tertiary university students for bursaries, thesis grants to postgraduate students, long stay allowances to medical students and allowances to the physically

 

  1. The Secretariat will continue to support 1,099 continuing students in Algeria, China, France, Germany, Hungary, Morocco, Russia and Serbia under the bilateral scholarship schemes awards and also support 1,188 students under non-bilateral scholarship award schemes in Australia, Canada, China, Cuba, France, India, Morocco, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States of

 

  1. The Public Sector Reform Secretariat supported the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Authority (DVLA), the Monitoring and Evaluation Secretariat of the Office of the President, the Commission on Human Rights and Administrative Justice (CHRAJ), Office of the Head of the Civil Service and the Births and Deaths Registry with various office equipment and vehicles to enhance their operations and service

 

  1. In 2022, the Public Sector Reform Secretariat will continue the implementation of the National Public Sector Reforms Strategy (NPSRS), 2018-2023 and the Public Sector Reform for Results Project (PSRRP).

 

Investment Promotion and Management Programme
  1. Speaker, under the Millennium Development Authority (MiDA), the Achimota and Dansoman Low Voltage Bifurcation (LVB) works were completed while the Kwabenya West Work Order and other projects are at various stages of completion. The Pokuase 580Mw Bulk Power supply point was commissioned to improve power supply to about 350,000 households in the catchment area. The facilities will reduce transmission and distribution losses and improve financial viabilities of GRIDCo and ECG.

 

  1. The Ghana Investment Promotion Centre registered 173 new projects with foreign participation valued at US$1.19 billion. The Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) component of this value was US$1.03 billion. The total initial capital transfers for newly registered projects amounted to US$67.18

 

  1. The Microfinance and Small Loans Centre (MASLOC) recovered GH¢4.90 million from Small Loans beneficiaries. The Centre distributed a total of 16,790 sewing machines and 16,360 hair In addition, an amount of GH¢574,000 was

 

disbursed to 22,960 fire victims at Odawna in Greater Accra. The Centre also allocated 100 tricycles to beneficiaries.

 

  1. In 2022, the Centre projects to disburse GH¢64.00 million in Micro and Small Loans and GH¢20.00 million in vehicle and tricycle GH¢36.00 million of the total amount will be from loan recoveries.

 

Regulatory Services Programme
  1. The review of the 2021 Internal Audit reports identified systemic control weaknesses with regard to procurement, cash management and payroll Total audit infractions and recommendations of 5,482 with a monetary value of GH¢800.33 million were revealed and 2002 of these recommendations, amounting to GH¢319.15 million, were implemented by management of covered entities. The Agency will follow-up on the implementation of the remaining 3,480 recommendations.

 

  1. The Internal Audit Agency (IAA), conducted Special Audit Assignments in nine covered entities. Additionally, the Agency undertook a number of assurance and advisory services including: reviewing the operations of the Ghana School Feeding Programme (GSFP); National Identification Systems and Project (NISP); COVID-19 expenditures; and value for money assessment for the Ministry of Transport for contracts to reconstruct or rehabilitate landing ferry sites along the Volta

 

  1. In 2022, the IAA will focus on contributing towards Government Policy of Good Governance and Accountability as well as implementing its 2022-2025 Strategic Plan to achieve the stated objectives of:
    • Building and strengthening institutional capacity and capability of IAA for value adding internal audit practice;
    • Improving public sector internal audit practice for effective Public Financial Management; and
    • Re-positioning public sector internal audit practice for improved visibility, public acceptability and

 

Zongo Development Fund Programme
  1. Speaker, under the Zongo Development Fund, 34No. 6-unit basic educational classroom blocks have been completed, while 21 are at various stages of completion. Over 3,050 dual desks were supplied to basic schools in Zongo communities across the country. An additional supply of 19,550 pieces of classroom furniture is expected to be carried out by the end of this year. The Fund is also conducting feasibility studies for the development of Model Senior High Schools in Zongo communities across the country.

 

  1. A total of 252No. household toilets were constructed in partnership with the Ga Mashie Development Agency. The Fund also completed 8No. institutional toilet facilities, while works on additional 10No. institutional toilet facilities are at advanced stages of

 

  1. The Fund completed the construction of 58No. mechanised community water systems in 58 communities across the country. Works on an additional 59No. mechanised community water systems are still ongoing in 59 communities, with a substantial proportion of this number at advanced stages of

 

  1. Speaker, works are ongoing on 11 recreational parks in Aboabo, Agogo, Bantama, Chiraa, Dodowa, Dunkwa-on-Offin, Essikado, Larabanga, Manhyia, Old Tafo and Sowutuom. These ongoing works are expected to be completed before the end of 2021.

 

  1. The Fund supplied and installed 3,430No. streetlight units in selected Zongo communities across the This intervention is expected to increase visibility in the communities at night and improve public safety and security for all inhabitants and motorists.

 

  1. Since its establishment, the Fund has provided tuition support grants to 239 brilliant but needy Zongo students in tertiary institutions. The Fund has also provided over 60,000No. textbooks on English language, Arabic language, Mathematics and Science to the Islamic Education Unit to stock libraries of selected Zongo

 

  1. The Fund is also currently assessing over 300 business plans from trainees for startup grants and entrepreneurship support to enable them start their own These plans were received from over 1,200 Zongo youth trained in various vocational skills and entrepreneurship across the country.

 

  1. The Fund is rolling out a plan to train 3,000 Zongo Youth in various vocational skills and support 1,000 of them with start-up grants, and train 1,000 Zongo poultry out-growers out of whom 500 will be supported with startup grants.

 

  1. Speaker, in 2022, all ongoing projects under the Zongo Infrastructure Development Programme will be continued. The Fund will also continue to implement the activities outlined in the social and economic development programme which focuses on skills training and entrepreneurship support, provision of social protection for the poor, community mobilisation and public sensitisation programmes.

 

OFFICE OF THE HEAD OF CIVIL SERVICE

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Management and Administration Programme
  1. Speaker, the Office of the Head of Civil Service (OHCS) analysed and compiled reports received from Ministries into the 2020 Civil Service Annual Performance Report. Copies of the Report were distributed to stakeholders and a soft copy uploaded onto the OHCS website.

 

  1. A sensitisation forum for about 180 staff of OHCS and its Departments was organised on 22nd June, 2021. The forum discussed Sexual Harassment at the Workplace and Conflict of Interest as part of the Public Sector Integrity Programme (PSIP).

 

  1. A total of 149 eligible officers completed and submitted their Assets Declaration forms to the Auditor General, in accordance with Article 286 of the 1992 Constitution and the Public Office Holders Act 1998, (Act 550).

 

  1. In 2022, the OHCS will undertake the following activities:
    • Prepare and adopt a Gender Strategy and Action Plan applicable to OHCS and all entities under the OHCS, and train entities to implement it;
    • Update and roll out standardised templates and formats for Client Service Charters;
    • Upgrade the OHCS website, develop and roll out online and mobile app-based applications on processes and procedures in the Civil Service for internal and external users of the OHCS website;
    • Hold Annual Performance Awards for Best Performing Chief Director /Head of Department and Director, and establish criteria for semi-annual performance awards; and
    • Develop a framework for continuous organisational learning and

 

  1. The Workplace Safety and Health Response Strategy (WSHRS) document was reviewed and finalised and the review of the Administrative Instructions of the Ghana Civil Service was also completed. The WSHRS document will be launched in 2022.

 

  1. In 2022, the Service will review the Civil Service Act, Regulations, and Code of Conduct, implement and report on National Anti-Corruption Action Plan (NACAP) activities as well as implement the OHCS 2022 Action Plan.

 

Institutional Development Programme
  1. The Public Records and Archives Administration Department (PRAAD) undertook the following activities:

 

  • Decongested records offices of two public institutions;
  • Dispositioned 21,634 records at the National Records Centre;
  • Monitored and evaluated Records Management Systems in 20 public institutions; and
  • Scanned and stored 14,021 archival documents of

 

  1. In 2022, PRAAD will undertake the following:
  2. Train records officers in records management;
    • Digitise Archival Sheets;
    • Monitor or assess records management systems in public institutions; and
    • Dispose-of boxes of records at the National Records

 

  1. The Management Services Department reviewed schemes of service for 10 organisations and conducted management reviews for four Ministries and Departments (M&Ds).

 

  1. In 2022, the Department will develop, review and finalise six schemes of service programmes for M&Ds, conduct management reviews in seven M&Ds, develop, review and finalise five organisational manuals for M&Ds and develop establishment levels for six M&Ds.

 

Human Resource Management Programme
  1. Speaker, following the successful organisation of the 2021 Civil Service Week celebration and awards ceremony, a total of 117 officers comprising; 10 Chief Directors, 10 Directors, 41 professionals, 35 sub-professionals, and 21 other past and serving public/civil service staff were given meritorious awards for their excellent performance and dedication to the Service.

 

  1. In 2021, the Service vetted 6,449 officers for promotion. In addition, 6,935 civil service staff participated in scheme of service and competency-based training at the OHCS Training

 

  1. The performance of 36 Chief Directors and 261 officers consisting of 33 Heads of Department (HoDs) and 228 Directors/Analogous grades were assessed based on their 2020 performance agreements with 78.3 percent of them attaining excellent A total of 9,102 officers on the grades of Deputy Director/Analogous and below were also assessed on their 2020 performance.

 

  1. A new Pensions Manual with the objective to enlighten and clarify the processes and requirements for claiming pension benefits was developed and published on the website of the OHCS. Civil Service staff will be sensitised on the contents of the Manual.

 

  1. In 2022, the Service will validate documentation of 6,500 eligible officers to be processed for promotion, continue the implementation of the Performance Management System and conduct 24 scheme of service and competency-based training for 5,000 Civil Service

 

PARLIAMENT OF GHANA

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Parliamentary Business Programme
  1. Speaker, during the Second Meeting of the First Session of the Eighth Parliament of the Fourth Republic spanning January to August 2021, the House held 75 Plenary and 189 Committee Sittings to consider and approve 164 Papers and other policy proposals that were laid before the House by the Executive Branch. These included nine Bills, 38 Committee Reports, 11 Reports of the Auditor General and three Bilateral Agreements for waiver of visa requirement.

 

  1. As at August 2021, six Bills, including a Private Member Bill, had been passed into Law out of the nine presented. The House admitted 32 Statements, while various Ministers of State were asked to respond to 133

 

  1. In 2022, Parliament will continue to discharge its constitutional obligation in the areas of: passing the required legislation to support policy implementation; exercising financial control to improve accountability of state resources; overseeing implementation of public programmes and projects; reviewing and approving loans and other international business transactions to support implementation of critical national projects; and exercising effective representation of the

 

  1. In addition, Parliament will commence the implementation of the new Standing Orders which is expected to come into force during the The new Orders will create new Committees including a Budget Committee, a Committee on Economic Planning and a Committee on Public Services.

 

  1. The Public Accounts Committee held 42 days of Public Sittings in the Bono, North East, Northern and Western Regions to consider the Reports of the Auditor General for the financial year ended 31st December, 2020. The Reports were on Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs), Public Boards and Corporations, Internally Generated Funds (IGFs), District Assemblies Common Fund (DACF) and Pre-University Educational Institutions.

 

  1. The Committee made 26 recommendations of which 17 were resolved. Select Committees also undertook limited monitoring visits to project sites due to the COVID-19

 

  1. The Parliamentary Service Office Support Project (PSOSP) was continued and is now 45 percent Other projects at various stages of completion are: the e-Parliament project; Phase II of the Table Office MIS; the Data Centre; and the operationalisation of the Budget and Fiscal Analysis Office.

 

  1. In 2022, Parliament will upgrade ICT facilities in the Debating Chamber and Committee meeting rooms to improve the quality of video and replace consoles to improve feed for live broadcast of

 

  1. The PSOSP will be fully completed in 2022. Phase I of the construction of constituency offices for Members of Parliament will commence in 2022. Ten Parliamentary Resource Centres are to be established in 10

 

  1. Speaker, Parliament of Ghana will host the Conference of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association International in 2022 and a Planning Committee has been put together to commence the planning and organisation of the event.

 

AUDIT SERVICE

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Management and Administration Programme
  1. Speaker, work commenced on the construction of six regional and district Audit Service offices and the projects are at various stages of completion. The Service also completed the construction of a district office at Winneba. In 2022, the Service will complete the ongoing refurbishment of office buildings.

 

Audit Operations Programme
  1. As at June 2021, out of the planned 5,465 audits, the Service completed 2,828, representing 52 percent and submitted 18 main reports to In addition, the Service undertook a number of special audits and six reports were issued to Parliament.

 

  1. In 2022, the Service will continue with its core financial audit of 4,700 entities out of the audit universe of 5,760. These include MDAs, MMDAs, pre-university educational institutions, and Special Audits. The Service will also conduct audits in the areas of oil and gas exploration, procurement and contract

 

  1. Furthermore, the Service will continue to build the capacity of management and staff to be abreast with international standards and best practices to enhance its ability to undertake audits in new and emerging areas. It will also organise stakeholder engagement and implement the provisions on Disallowance and Surcharge and Asset Declaration with the aim of deepening good governance in the public

 

PUBLIC SERVICES COMMISSION

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Management and Administration Programme
  1. Speaker, the Public Services Commission (PSC) began work on the development of a 5-year strategic plan aligned to the National Development Policy Framework to enable it to refocus its strategic direction to meet the expectations of its stakeholders. In this regard, a draft strategic plan was prepared and will be finalised by December 2021.

 

  1. In 2022, the Commission will begin the implementation of the Strategic Plan and review the Public Services Commission Act. The Commission will also begin the process of preparing a Constitutional Instrument in accordance with provisions in Article 196 of the 1992

 

Public Service Human Resource Management Programme
  1. The reimplementation of the Human Resource Management Information System (HRMIS) commenced with 12 pilot MDAs. In collaboration with the pilot MDAs, the Commission mapped out all Human Resource processes unto the HRMIS Oracle platform. Test run is currently ongoing, and the system is expected to go live by the end of December 2021. In 2022, PSC will roll out the system to all Public Service Organisations (PSOs).

 

  1. In 2021, the Commission trained 309 Human Resource Directors and Managers from four MDAs in the use of the public performance appraisal instrument to improve performance and

 

  1. In 2022, the Commission will review the public performance appraisal instrument to address the bottlenecks observed during its usage as well as organise a series of training workshops to enhance performance and to improve service delivery in the Public

 

  1. In addition, the Commission will facilitate the signing of performance agreements between Chief Executive Officers and their respective Governing Boards and Councils, to improve corporate governance practices in

 

  1. The Commission reviewed 18 scheme of service documents received from some Five of them were approved while the rest are at various stages of the approval process. The Commission also reviewed 10 out of the 15 organograms received from public service institutions. Work is ongoing on the remainder and expected to be completed by the end of 2021.

 

  1. In 2022, the Commission will continue to support public service institutions to develop schemes of service and organograms to enhance effective human resource management and organisational development.

 

  1. In line with its constitutional mandate, the Commission continued to provide technical advice and assistance in recruitments and promotions to public service As at September 2021, the Commission had conducted interviews for 30 out of 76 requests received for Categories ‘A’ and ‘B’ office holders and 83 out of 86 Category ‘C’ and below office holders. In 2022, the Commission will continue to facilitate and assist recruitment and promotion exercises to ensure that suitable officers are recruited or promoted in the Public Service.

 

  1. The Commission began the process to review the Human Resource Management Policy Framework and Manual (HRMPF&M) to meet the changing demands of the Public Service. In 2022, the review and update will be completed and refresher training for PSOs will also

 

  1. The Commission, in 2021, organised a series of training and sensitisation workshops for members of newly constituted Governing Boards and Councils, Chief Executive Officers and Directors in Public Service Organisations on the Public Service Governance Manual and related governance issues. In 2022, the Commission will continue the training and sensitisation drive to improve effective corporate governance in the Public

 

ELECTORAL COMMISSION

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022
  1. Speaker, the Electoral Commission (EC), based on its planned programmes, conducted and supervised the following elections: Council of State; Nkoranza South and North District level; Medical and Dental Council; and confirmation of MMDCEs. The Commission also documented and held stakeholder engagements to review the 2020 General Elections.

 

  1. In 2022, the Commission will undertake institutional and electoral reforms, provide all citizens access to electoral education and services as well as build institutional capacity of staff through regular training The Commission will also conduct Continuous Voter Registration Exercise, inspection of political party offices, and District Level and By-Elections for areas and constituencies with vacancies due to death and resignations.

 

MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND REGIONAL INTEGRATION

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022
  1. Speaker, in accordance with its mandate, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration facilitated Ghana’s participation in various international engagements.

 

  1. In January 2021, Ghana participated in the 58th Ordinary Session of the ECOWAS Authority of Heads of State and Government held virtually, and successfully hosted the 59th Ordinary Session of the ECOWAS Authority of Heads of State and Government in Accra on 19th June, 2021, under the Chairmanship of the ECOWAS Chair, E. President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo.

 

  1. Speaker, H.E. The President participated in the 34th Ordinary Session of the Assembly of Heads of State and Government of the African Union held virtually on 6th February, 2021. At the Summit, African Heads of State committed to strengthening their collective responses in fighting the COVID-19 pandemic, including marshalling resources and ensuring that no country on the Continent was left behind.

 

  1. Speaker, following a rigorous campaign by the Ministry, Ghana was, on 11th June, 2021, elected to serve a two-year term on the United Nations Security Council for the period, January 2022-December 2023, having obtained 185 votes out of 190 votes cast. The votes obtained is an indication of Ghana’s high standing among the comity of nations.

 

  1. In view of E. The President’s effective leadership as ECOWAS Chair in addressing conflict situations in some parts of West Africa and the Sahel, Ghana will bring to bear her rich experience in conflict mediation, prevention and reconstruction during her tenure as a non-permanent member of the UN Security Council.

 

  1. Ghana will commit to promoting human rights, sustainable development, peace and security to advance the work of the UN Security As a result, the UN Security Council constituted a working group to develop a Concept Paper on Ghana’s Priority Thematic areas for its tenure.

 

  1. Other key activities undertaken under international cooperation include the following:
    • Coordinating the Meeting of the Ministers for Justice and Foreign Affairs of the Committee of Five ECOWAS member states on the accession of the Third States of ECOWAS Treaty;
    • Coordinating the donation of 600,000 doses of COVID-19 COVAX vaccines to Ghana by the United Nations;

 

  • Organising a consultative meeting with traditional and religious leaders on ECOWAS Vision 2050 at Kyebi, Ghana;
  • Commemorating the Commonwealth Day by Ghana and other Member States of the Commonwealth;
  • Hosting the ECOWAS Inter-Ministerial Committee on Institutional Reforms;
  • Signing of the Exchange of Notes and Record of Discussions between Ghana and Japan in respect of “the Project for Human Resource Development Scholarship (JDS)” and “the Programme for COVID-19 Crisis Emergency Response Support”; and
  • Hosting of the Second Foreign Office Consultations (FOC) between Ghana and

 

  1. In pursuit of Ghana’s long-standing foreign policy commitment to good neighbourliness and solidarity with other African States, H.E. The President undertook a number of official visits to some African countries, including Burkina Faso, Niger and

 

  1. E. The President paid a two-day working visit to the European Union (EU) in Brussels, Belgium from 19th to 20th May, 2021 during which he engaged the leadership of the EU on bilateral issues related to sustainable cocoa cultivation, fisheries and regional security. Other discussions included a proposal by the EU to select Ghana as a possible manufacturing hub for COVID-19 vaccines in Africa, as well as the signing of a €170 million European Investment Bank (EIB) loan facility for the establishment of the Development Bank of Ghana.

 

  1. In return, Ghana was honoured by some high-level visits, including the visit by

H.E. Simonetta Sommaruga, former President of the Swiss Confederation and current Swiss Minister for Environment, Traffic, Energy and Communications, The Rt. Hon. Priti Patel, UK Home Secretary, and Hon. James Heappey, UK Minister for the Armed Forces. The visit by the UK Home Secretary culminated in the launch of a new 24-hour Super Priority Visa service to support business and leisure travel between Ghana and the United Kingdom.

 

Management and Administration Programme
  1. Speaker, the Ministry in collaboration with OHCS organised competency- based training programmes for a total of 213 Officers. In addition, the Ministry organised a pre-posting training for all 79 Foreign Service Officers due for postings to our Missions abroad as required by the Foreign Service Regulations (2018). Furthermore, a month-long training programme was held for all 37 Heads of Mission-designate to build their capacity for effective delivery.

 

  1. Speaker, the Ministry in its efforts to give a facelift and maintain the value of landed properties in our Missions abroad, undertook the following:
  2. Constructed the Ghana Permanent Mission in Geneva, Switzerland;

 

  • Purchased the Chancery Building of the Ghana Embassy in Tokyo;
  • Relocated the Passport Office Headquarters;
  • Purchased Chancery Building of the Ghana Embassy in Oslo; and
  • Carried out expansion works on the Consular Section of Ghana Embassy in

 

  1. Despite limitations posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the All Africa Students’ Union (AASU) organised the 10th Africa Students and Youth Summit which brought together over 1,000 young people from the African continent and beyond to deliberate on strategies for ending child labour in Africa. The Union also partnered the African Centre for the Constructive Resolution of Disputes (ACCORD) to train selected students on election and conflict

 

Passport Administration Programme
  1. Speaker, the Ministry took steps to improve service delivery with regard to Passport administration both in Ghana and its missions abroad. These initiatives include:
    • Provision of biometric equipment to 25 Missions abroad to capture biometric data of passport applicants;
    • Development of a website to capture passport data;
    • Purchase of generator sets for all 13 Passport Application Centres (PAC) in Ghana; and
    • Roll-out of E-Visa application hardware at our Missions abroad and at the Ghana Immigration Service.

 

  1. Speaker, in 2022, the Ministry will participate in all statutory meetings of the United Nations, the African Union, ECOWAS, the Commonwealth and other international organisations with the view to enhancing Ghana’s international image and influence abroad.

 

MINISTRY OF FINANCE

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022
  1. Speaker, as part of the core mandate of the Ministry of Finance, the 2021 Budget Statement and Economic Policy was presented to Parliament in March 2021, in accordance with Articles 179 and 180 of the 1992 Constitution. Subsequently, on 29th July, 2021, the Ministry presented to Parliament a Mid- Year Review of the 2021 Budget Statement and Economic Policy in fulfilment of Section 28 of the Public Financial Management Act, 2016 (Act 921).

 

Economic Policy Management Programme
  1. Speaker, following the passage of the Public Private Partnership Act, 2020 (Act 1039), the Ministry successfully disseminated and sensitised 43 Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs), 16 Regional Coordinating Councils (RCCs)

 

and all Metropolitan, Municipal and District Assemblies (MMDAs) on key provisions of the Act. In 2022, the Ministry will facilitate the preparation and passage of regulations to further strengthen the legal and regulatory framework for Public Private Partnership (PPP).

 

  1. Speaker, to enhance the Public Investment Management System, the Ministry sensitised and trained all MDAs, MMDAs and RCCs on the Public Investment Management (PIM) Regulations 2020 (L.I. 2411). In line with Regulation 8 of L.I. 2411, the Public Investment Programme Working Committee was inaugurated. A comprehensive, customised training programme on project appraisal and risk analysis was organised in collaboration with the University of Ghana Business School (UGBS) to build the capacity of 32 public officials.

 

  1. The Public Investment Plan (PIP) for the 2021-2024 Budget was uploaded unto the Hyperion and over 900 projects reflected in the Programme Based Budget Documents of MDAs. In 2022, the Ministry will also facilitate the development and deployment of the Integrated Bank of Projects (IBP) to enhance project preparation, appraisal, and implementation. In addition, guidelines on PIM will be developed and additional customised training rolled out for stakeholders as required by I. 2411.

 

  1. Speaker, as part of Government’s efforts to improve financing of critical infrastructure projects, the Ghana Infrastructure Investment Fund (Amendment) Act, 2021 (Act 1063) was passed to provide additional source of funds and extend the period of exemption from taxes.

 

  1. Speaker, the Ministry, in collaboration with the Ministry of Public Enterprises (MPE) and the State Interests and Governance Authority (SIGA), held a stakeholders’ consultation to discuss the draft State Ownership Policy to facilitate submission to Cabinet for consideration and approval. Following the approval of the policy, the Ministry, in 2022, will further develop an implementation strategy and dissemination plan for the Policy.

 

  1. Speaker, a verification of assets of defunct and inactive State-Owned Entities (SOEs) was completed to inform decision-making. In 2022, the Ministry will develop and finalise the Assets Management Policy Framework to guide the effective and efficient management and utilisation of State assets. In addition, the Ministry will coordinate the implementation of relevant asset management responsibilities of the various MDAs in line with the Public Financial Management Act and Regulations.

 

  1. The Ghana Asset Corporation (GACORP) Bill was submitted to Parliament for consideration in 2020. Parliament raised a number of issues which necessitated a revision and substantial amendment to the In 2022, the Bill will be finalised

 

and resubmitted to Cabinet and subsequently to Parliament for consideration and passage.

 

  1. Speaker, following the recent financial sector clean-up, it has become imperative for Government to embark on a Financial Literacy Campaign across the country to promote understanding of the benefits and risks associated with financial products and services, and enable Ghanaians make decisions in their best interests.

 

  1. A five year (2021-2025) National Financial Literacy Strategy was developed to serve as a blueprint for the financial literacy Government, in partnership with financial sector regulators and key stakeholders, will begin implementation of the strategy in 2022 with a pilot in some selected districts to test the appropriateness of the designed literacy tools and materials. Following this, Government will expand the programme to cover all 16 regions in the country.

 

  1. Speaker, following the passage of the Anti-Money Laundering Act, 2020 (Act 1044), the Ministry sensitised 896 participants from relevant institutions and other stakeholders on their obligations under the new legislation, and trained them on various aspects of enhancing Anti-Money Laundering/Combating the Financing of Terrorism (AML/CFT) compliance.

 

  1. In 2022, the Financial Intelligence Centre will strengthen collaboration with other Regulatory and Supervisory Bodies and Law Enforcement Agencies (LEAs) to deepen and improve understanding of Money laundering and Terrorist Financing This will enhance the fight against Money Laundering, Terrorist Financing and the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction (AML/TF&P).

 

  1. Speaker, Government will commence the development of sector specific AML/CFT guidelines for the Designated Non-Financial Businesses and Professions (DNFBP) sector to ensure compliance as required by the Anti-Money Laundering Act, 2020 (Act 1044). In 2022, the respective AML/CFT guidelines for Accountants and Casino Operators will be developed to guide their operations in line with the law.

 

Population and Housing Census
  1. Speaker, the enumeration phase of the 2021 Population and Housing Census (2021 PHC) was completed on 8th August, 2021 and the Preliminary Report was released on 22ndSeptember, 2021. The Report placed the current total population of Ghana at 30,792,608 composed of 15,610,149 million females (50.7 percent) and 15,182,459 million males (49.3 percent). Additional data collected during the census include population density, average household size, level of completion of structures and concentration of residential structures.

 

 

  1. In 2022, National, Regional, District and Thematic Reports of the 2021 Population and Housing Census will be published and disseminated. An Integrated Business Establishment Survey (IBES) will be conducted in 2022 to provide reliable, timely and relevant statistics. The survey report will also support the formulation and implementation of policies and strategies to stimulate growth in all sectors of the A survey on Annual Household Income and Expenditure will be conducted to provide information on income, expenditure and household living conditions.

 

Resource Mobilisation and Management Programme
  1. Speaker, in the 2021 Budget Statement and Economic Policy, Government introduced new tax measures to provide some relief to sections of the population hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, raise additional revenue and improve tax compliance.

 

  1. Revenue enhancement enactments were also passed to raise the requisite resources to: sustain the implementation of COVID-19 measures; pay excess capacity charges resulting from power purchase agreements signed prior to 2017; ensure sustainable sanitation management; and help defray outstanding commitments in the financial sector due to the clean-up.

 

  1. Speaker, in 2021 the Ministry implemented the following specific levies and taxes:
    • COVID-19 Health Recovery Levy of one percent on the supply of goods and services;
    • Sanitation and Pollution Levy of 10 pesewas on the price per litre of petrol and diesel;
    • Energy Sector Recovery Levy of 20 pesewas on the price per litre of petrol, diesel and LPG; and
    • A levy of 5 percent on profit-before-tax of banks to help defray outstanding commitments as a result of the financial sector clean-up.

 

  1. Speaker, with regard to the roll out of the Integrated Tax Application and Preparation System (iTaPS), the Personal Income Tax, PAYE, Corporate Income Tax, Withholding Tax and Tax Clearance Certificate modules were deployed for the filing and payment of taxes, thereby facilitating Government’s efforts to fulfil its goal of creating a cash-lite economy.

 

  1. Speaker, a mechanism for taxing High-Net-Worth-Individuals (HNWIs) was deployed. About 150 HNWIs were identified and their tax affairs are being managed by the HNWI unit of GRA. In 2022, the Ministry will finalise the policy on HNWI, and complete the estimation of the revenue potential of this subgroup.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will review and update Ghana’s Model Double Taxation Agreement to bring it in line with current legislation and international developments, and update the Customs Tariff with the 2022 version of the Harmonised Commodity Description and Coding System (HS Code).

 

  1. The Ministry under the Revenue Assurance and Compliance Enforcement (RACE) initiative will conduct revenue assurance to determine compliance of employers with respect to Pay-As-You-Earn (PAYE) taxes collected on behalf of The initiative will also carry out revenue assurances on the Service Taxes collected by commercial entities.

 

  1. Quarrying, sand wining and salt wining all fall within the mining sector but have not been given the same level of attention as extraction of metals. In 2022, Government will partner the private sector to introduce digital systems to monitor their activities and provide revenue

 

  1. The GRA will continue to match taxpayer data across various platforms and set up a dedicated desk in each Outfield office to deal with issues relating to professionals; introduce the Advanced Cargo Manifest and Advanced Passenger Information System (APIS) and introduce a self-clearance system where individuals can make direct application for clearance of imports without the services of a Customs House Agent.

 

Expenditure Management Programme
  1. Speaker, in line with efforts to ensure improved fiscal performance and sustainability, the Ministry sensitised 290 key stakeholders on the Public Financial Management Act, 2016 (Act 921) and the Public Financial Management Regulations (L.I. 2378). In 2022, the Ministry will continue with the sensitisation drive on the PFM Act and PFM Regulations to ensure strict compliance and promote fiscal discipline.

 

  1. The 2020 Annual National Accounts on Public Funds was prepared on the basis of whole Government Accounting, comprising the Consolidated Fund, Internally Generated Funds, Statutory Funds and Donor Funds utilised by MDAs, Statutory Fund Institutions, MMDAs and State-Owned Enterprises (SOEs). This, Speaker, is an expansion of the scope beyond the General Government Accounting basis used for the 2019 financial year which excluded SOEs.

 

  1. Speaker, to further improve comprehensiveness and consistency in Government financial reporting and ensure compliance with international standards, the International Public Sector Accounting Standards (IPSAS) Accredited Certification Programme was launched in January 2021. This is to ensure effective migration from financial reporting on a modified accrual basis to the more internationally recognised accrual basis IPSAS reporting system.

 

 

  1. Speaker, to facilitate efficient management and accurate reporting on the public sector wage bill, Government continued to migrate all public universities on to the Ghana Government payroll (IPPD2). In 2021, the Ghana Communication Technology University and the University of Environment and Sustainable Development in Somanya were migrated onto the payroll. Data collection from ten public universities was also completed to facilitate migration onto the Government payroll.

 

  1. Speaker, as part of efforts to promote a technology driven public procurement system to improve efficiency and transparency, 151 out of a target of 200 procurement entities were trained on the Ghana Electronic Procurement System (GHANEPS), bringing the total since the start of the GHANEPS Project in 2019 to 263 entities as at end October 2021. Currently, 2,930 users have been created in the System and 160 tenders published, of which 32 contracts were awarded through the System. This is to ensure efficiency and accountability in public procurement processes.

 

  1. To ensure compliance with the Public Procurement Act 663 as amended, a total of 1,268 procurement practitioners were trained in general public procurement Out of this number, 1,088 of the participants were from the Local Government Service.

 

  1. In 2022, the PPA will train 180 entities on the GHANEPS, and 1,500 procurement practitioners’ in general procurement management as well as issue compliance guidelines on the policy on locally assembled vehicles by the first quarter of

 

  1. Speaker in line with Government’s efforts to promote locally assembled and manufactured vehicles, a draft procurement policy on locally assembled vehicles was developed. Consultations with stakeholders are almost complete, and the policy will be finalised by the end of 2021.

 

MINISTRY OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, DECENTRALISATION AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Management and Administration Programme
  1. Speaker, to improve revenue generation and management at the local level, the Ministry of Local Government, Decentralisation and Rural Development rolled out the District Level Revenue (dLRev) Software in 114 Metropolitan, Municipal and District Assemblies (MMDAs) across the country. In 2022, the Ministry will roll out the software in the remaining MMDAs to improve on their revenue mobilisation.

 

  1. In addition, the Ministry developed and deployed a web-based M&E System, that is, the District Data Development Platform (DDDP) to all 261 MMDAs to address gaps in data collection on all Government interventions at the local level. It is expected that the DDDP will be a game-changer for informed decision-making.

 

  1. To further deepen decentralisation, the Ministry undertook several initiatives, including the transfer of GH¢331.54 million to qualifying MMDAs as incentive for their performance for the 2018 and the 2019 fiscal years under the District Assemblies Performance Assessment Tool (DPAT). This intervention was to support the implementation of District Assemblies Annual Action Plans for improved service delivery.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will continue to assess the performance of MMDAs using DPAT for 261 Assemblies based on 2020 and 2021 fiscal years, and transfer appropriate amounts to qualifying MMDAs to support the implementation of their Annual Action Plans.

 

  1. Speaker, in 2022, Government will continue with implementation of strategies to improve IGF mobilisation and implement the National Decentralisation Policy. Additionally, the Office of the Head of Local Government Service (OHLGS) will organise orientation workshops for stakeholders on the Performance Contract at the RCC and MMDA levels and also implement 2022 Performance Contract Agreements with the District Chief Executives (DCEs) and the District Coordinating Directors (DCDs) of the MMDAs.

 

  1. In 2022, the RCCs will organise training to build human resource capacity to improve on quality service delivery of MMDAs. Regional Coordinating Directors will sign Performance Contract Agreements with Regional Ministers and ensure implementation of policies and strategies for the overall development of the

 

Local Level Development and Management Programme
  1. The Ministry, through the Department of Community Development, trained 4,601 artisans in 25 Community Development and Vocational Technical Institutes across the country to sharpen the technical and vocational skills of the youth for employment and job creation opportunities.

 

  1. In addition, the Department trained 370 community educators at the Rural Development College at Kwaso in the Ashanti Furthermore, 1,107 trainees graduated in various trade skills and competencies at both institutional and community levels. The Department also procured start-up tools and equipment which were distributed to all trainees.

 

  1. In 2022, the Department of Community Development will continue to train 5,000 youth in Vocational and Technical skills (CDVTIs) and 2,600 youth in employable skills on income generating activities, trades and craft to support the implementation of the 1D1F agenda within the local communities.

 

  1. The Department will also train 400 core staff and social workers in the use of Child Protection Toolkits and 500 Community Educators in Social Protection and community development at the Rural Development College at Kwaso in the Ashanti

 

  1. Speaker, during the period under review, the Department of Parks and Gardens maintained a total of 1.53 million m² of landscaped sites in major cities and towns across the country. The Department raised and supplied 262,925 seedlings for sale and beautification. In 2022, the Department will continue the landscape beautification of road medians to 10,000 m² for urban and peri-urban communities and maintain a total landscaped area of 2 million m².

 

  1. In 2021, the Department planted 10,209 trees across the country to commemorate World Environment Day. This was done in contribution to the President’s initiative of greening Ghana. In 2022, the Department will propagate 400,000 seedlings for sale and supply to institutions and plant 100,000 trees across the country as part of horticultural sensitisation programmes to combat climate

 

  1. In 2021, a total of 32,900 tourists visited the Aburi Botanical Gardens. In 2022, the Department will continue with the redevelopment of the Aburi Botanical Gardens into an eco-tourism site to attract more tourists.

 

  1. Speaker, under the Ghana Productive Safety Net Project (GPSNP), Government:
    • provided jobs for 33,952 extreme poor persons in 80 MMDAs with a total wage payout of GH¢53.43 million;
    • disbursed a total of GH¢5.82 million to 9,244 beneficiary households from 128 communities in 41 MMDAs in the five regions of the North to commence businesses or expand their trade;
    • undertook 348 sub-projects made up of 63 feeder roads, 76 small earth dams and 209 climate change mitigation activities (plantations). A total of 53 of these sub- projects have been completed and the remaining projects are at an average of 75 percent completion; and
    • distributed a total of 7.9 million cash crop seedlings to farmers under the Planting for Export and Rural Development (PERD)

 

  1. Speaker, Government under the Ghana Secondary Cities Support Programme, (GSCSP) transferred an amount of GH¢210.19 million to 10 RCCs and 25 MMAs to support the implementation of their Annual Action Plans.

 

  1. In 2022, Government will complete the 295 ongoing sub-projects under GPSNP I, and commence the implementation of GPSNP II in 80 poor districts across the It will also continue the implementation of GSCSP in the 25 MMAs.

 

  1. Speaker, the Ministry, through the Local Climate Adaptive Living Facility (LoCAL) Project and Boosting Green Employment and Enterprise Opportunities (GrEEn) Project, undertook a number of activities, including construction of mechanised boreholes in Ada East and Fanteakwa North Districts and coconut tree planting around clusters of schools. It also transferred GH¢1.27 million to six beneficiary MMDAs to create economic and employment opportunities through the Cash for Work (CfW) initiative. In 2022, Government will continue to support MMDAs in the implementation of their Annual Action Plans and Budget under the GrEEn project.

 

  1. An amount of GH¢5.11 million was transferred to 100 MMDAs for social and child protection activities to support the implementation of Integrated Social Services (ISS). Government will continue to support MMDAs in the implementation of ISS, in

 

  1. The Modernising Agriculture in Ghana (MAG) programme will continue the implementation of Food Safety Guidelines for MMDAs and ensure the operationalisation of the District Centre for Agriculture, Commerce and Technology (DCACT) concept in 261 The Ministry will also implement the Resilience in Northern Ghana (RING II) Project in 17 MMDAs in four regions to improve nutrition and resilience.

 

  1. The redevelopment of Kumasi Central Market Phase II and Takoradi Market were commenced and will be continued in

 

Births and Deaths Registration Programme
  1. Speaker, the Births and Deaths Registry registered a total number of 361,268 births, of which 183,690 were males and 177,578 females. In addition, 34,670 deaths were registered of which male deaths stood at 18,929 and female deaths at 15,741.

 

  1. In 2022, the Department will register 739,133 births out of an expected 923,916 births and 78,698 deaths out of 224,845 expected deaths. The Department will also sensitise the staff and public on the new Births and Deaths Registry (BDR) Act 2020 (Act 1027) and

 

Regional Reorganisation and Development Programme
  1. Speaker, the Ministry is pursuing development in the newly created Regions. In all, 30 out of 60 projects, comprising 5No. administration blocks and 25No. bungalows were completed and commissioned. Works on the remaining projects are progressing steadily and are expected to be completed in 2022.

 

NATIONAL MEDIA COMMISSION

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022
  1. Speaker, the National Media Commission received 30 complaints from January to October 2021 out of which 12 were resolved. The Commission will continue to play the role of a mediator in all complaints received against the media and enforce media standards in 2022.

 

  1. The Commission in collaboration with the Ministry of Information launched the Secretariat on the Coordinated Mechanism on the Safety of Journalists which was set up to receive, investigate and resolve complaints from journalists on their

 

  1. Speaker, 45 additional newspapers were registered in 2021, bringing the total to 2,541, while the electronic media landscape has a total of 659 operators. The Commission reviewed guidelines on the following: rejoinders; local language broadcasting; political advertising; equitable coverage by the state-owned media; political journalism; print media; religious broadcasting; and broadcasting standards. The Commission will train journalists on these subject matters in 2022.

 

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING COMMISSION

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022
  1. Speaker, the National Development Planning Commission (NDPC) continued its review, validation and finalisation of the Medium-Term National Development Policy Framework (2022-2025). In line with the National Development Planning (System) Act, 1994 (Act 480), the Commission developed the policy framework through the Cross Sectoral Planning Groups (CSPG).

 

  1. The Commission prepared the 2020 Annual Progress Report (APR) on the implementation of the Medium-Term National Development Policy Framework (2018-2021) dubbed, “An Agenda for Jobs; Creating Prosperity and Equal Opportunities for All”. The report provides the status on implementation of the national development agenda at the end of 2020. The Commission will prepare the Annual Progress Report for year 2021 in

 

  1. The National Development Monitor (NDM) was prepared by the The NDM analysed Ghana’s development progress in the last decade (2010-2019)

 

based on selected indicators and compared it to the performance of some selected Lower-Middle-Income Countries, namely: Bolivia; Côte d’Ivoire; Rwanda; and Vietnam.

 

  1. The Commission initiated the process of preparing a comprehensive National Human Capacity Development Strategy. The strategy seeks to create a globally competitive workforce, equipped with the skills and competencies required to meet contemporary development demands and achieve the country’s development goals. Key issues for consideration include the “Future of Work”, the 4th Industrial Revolution, and decent jobs, as well as opportunities for the lifelong development of people’s skills and

 

  1. Given Ghana’s commitment to international protocols and agreements, the Commission will coordinate the development of the following: National Human Capital Development Strategy; Voluntary National Review (VNR) of the SDGs; National Productivity Index; and National Foods Systems Country

 

MINISTRY OF INFORMATION

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022
  1. Speaker, the Ministry of Information organised 47 Minister’s Press Briefings to keep the general public apprised of work of Government. The forum is also used to update Ghanaians on projects and programmes of MDAs as well as COVID-19 related issues.

 

  1. A total of three Mass Media Campaigns on “Back to School”, “Wear your Mask” and “COVID-19 Vaccine” were carried out. The “Back-to-School” campaign was to effect behavioural change among the school The outcomes achieved included awareness of safety protocols among the student population and the compliance with these safety protocols by students, teachers and non- teaching staff.

 

  1. The Ministry, working with other stakeholders, embarked on a vigorous public education campaign on COVID-19 vaccination across the country to minimise vaccine hesitancy which often characterises all vaccination This improved acceptability for the vaccine roll-out throughout the country.

 

  1. Speaker, as part of measures to introduce a Broadcasting Bill in accordance with the 1992 Constitution to sanitise the media landscape, the Ministry organised a consultative meeting with stakeholders on Broadcasting in Ghana on 16th April, 2021. At the meeting, stakeholders reviewed the draft bill and emerging issues in the broadcasting sector and unanimously agreed that the broadcasting sector should be regulated to deal with unethical standards and signed a Memorandum of Cooperation to that effect.

 

 

  1. Implementation of the RTI was intensified across public institutions in the Currently, 478 public institutions have established RTI units. In June 2021, a report on the implementation of the RTI Law was submitted to Parliament as required by law. Stakeholder consultation on the L.I for RTI Law is currently ongoing.

 

  1. In furtherance of media freedom and ensuring the safety of journalists, and also in line with international standards, the Office of the Coordinated Mechanism on the Safety of Journalists was commissioned on 4th May, The office is located at the premises of the Office of the Head of Local Government Service.

 

  1. Speaker, the purpose of the Government Visual Identity Project is to harmonise and create consensus in our national identity and the Ministry was instrumental in bringing this to fruition. Key documents such as letterheads, call cards, logos, templates for presentations, memoranda and press releases were harmonised for use by MDAs.

 

  1. Public Education Campaigns (PEC) are carried out to educate the populace on key Government policies and pressing social In the course of the year, the following five PECs have taken place: 2021 Population and Housing Census; Ghana National Household Registry; nationwide tree planting exercise (Green Ghana); COVID-19 Protocol adherence; and payment of property rate in the Greater Accra Region.

 

  1. Speaker, in 2022, the Ministry in accordance with its Sector Medium Term Plan, will embark on the following activities:
    • develop policies to curb fake news and disinformation;
    • develop policies   towards   creating   access    to   accurate              Government information;
    • intensify the implementation of the RTI Law across public institutions;
    • seek to introduce a Broadcasting Bill in accordance with the 1992 Constitution;
    • continue implementation of the Media Capacity Enhancement Programme;
    • support implementation of the Framework for the Safety of Journalists in Ghana by NMC; and
    • continue the reform of Ghana Broadcasting Corporation (GBC).

 

RIGHT TO INFORMATION COMMISSION

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022
  1. Speaker, the Right to Information Commission celebrated an Information Week, which coincided with the International Day of Universal Access to Information, by creating a platform that brought together stakeholders such as

 

the media, policymakers, civil society, higher educational institutions, international partners and RTI activists for an engagement to assess the implementation of the RTI Law and implications for national development.

 

  1. The Commission held public lectures in Kumasi and Sefwi Wiawso as part of efforts to create awareness on the Right to Access Information. Determinations and decisions were made concerning 18 review applications from the

 

  1. Speaker, the public, civil society organisations and institutions of higher learning were invited to submit proposals and recommendations towards the making of a Legislative Instrument (L.I.) to operationalise Act 989. Proposals were received and the engagement is ongoing to finalise the L.I. and Information Manual by the end of 2021.

 

  1. Speaker, in 2022, the Commission will: continue to disseminate and educate the public about the Right to Information Act; take the necessary steps to secure passage of the Legislative Instrument (L.I) for the Act; commence implementation of the provisions of the L.I. upon passage; and set up zonal offices across the country.

 

MINISTRY OF PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022
  1. Speaker, the Ministry of Parliamentary Affairs held a dialogue with Civil Society Organisations on the theme: “Economic Revitalisation amid the COVID- 19 Pandemic: The CSOs’ Perspective”, aimed at recognising CSOs’ involvement in national responses to the pandemic and identifying opportunities emerging from the crisis and lessons learnt.

 

  1. The Ministry engaged the Core Leadership of Parliament on 27th July, 2021 on the theme: “Building Consensus and Trust in Parliament to Enhance both Procedural and Substantive Democracy”. Measures needed to build and deepen consensus and trust in Parliament were examined, mechanisms to sustain public trust, confidence and interest in the work of Parliament were also identified and discussed, as well as the relationship between the Ministry of Parliamentary Affairs and

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will build on the progress made in 2021 by undertaking the following activities:
    • Organise a Constitutional Review Conference;
    • Organise Good Governance and Leadership workshops for MPs and MMDCEs;
    • Support the strengthening of the capacity of Parliament and Parliamentarians as well as the Leader of Government Business;

 

  • Engage CSOs, including the media and political parties, on the formulation and implementation of public policies for national development; and
  • Review the performance of First Session of the 8th

 

Economic Sector

 

  1. The focus of the Economic Sector is to ensure: a strong and resilient economy; sustainable and reliable energy supply; industrial transformation; improved science, technology, and innovation; private sector development, agriculture and rural development; fisheries and aquaculture development; and tourism and creative arts development.

 

  1. Interventions in this sector are also geared towards the attainment of: Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 1,2,4,8,9,10,11,12,16 & 17, and the African Union (AU) Agenda Goals 1,4,5,7,9 & 20 through the promotion of productive activities, decent job creation, and inclusive economic

 

MINISTRY OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022
  1. Speaker, Government continued with the implementation of the five modules of the Planting for Food and Jobs (PFJ) flagship programme. The aim of the programme is to sustain the gains made in increased productivity of selected crops, food security and job creation after a successful first phase from 2017 to 2020.

 

Crops and Livestock Development Programme
  1. Speaker, to increase productivity and incomes, as well as improve livelihoods of beneficiary farmers, the Ministry procured and distributed 31,797mt of improved seeds, comprising 11,289mt of maize, 16,382mt of rice, 4,126mt of soybean and 26mt of vegetables to farmers across the country as at September 2021. In addition, 259,500mt of various fertilizers were also distributed to PFJ beneficiary farmers across the country.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will continue to provide improved seeds and fertilizers at subsidised prices to increase production volumes of maize, rice, soyabean, sorghum, cowpea and

 

  1. Speaker, under the Savannah Agricultural Productivity Improvement Project (SAPIP) the Ministry developed 1000ha of farmland at Gbedembilsi, Kojope and Janga for rice production which are estimated to yield about 40 percent above the national average production of 2.5-3.0mt/ha in lowland valleys.

 

  1. Speaker, under the “Planting for Export and Rural Development” initiative, 1,360,589 cashew, coffee, coconut, oil palm, mango and rubber seedlings were distributed to 7,543 farmers in Ahafo, Ashanti, Bono, Central, Eastern, Greater Accra, Oti, Western, Western North and Volta Regions. This brings the total seedlings distributed to beneficiary farmers to 23,216,000 since 2019.

 

  1. In 2022, the Tree Crops Development Authority will establish zonal offices, train community agents to serve as supervisors, embark on community sensitisation and engage private sector industrial mills such as oil palm processors to raise and distribute

 

  1. Speaker, under the “Rearing for Food and Jobs” initiative, as at September, 2021, 86,000 cockerels, 1,946 small ruminants, 43,200 broiler day old chicks and 4,895 grower pigs were procured and supplied to beneficiary farmers. In addition, 144,000 layers and 100,000 broiler day-old chicks were ordered for distribution to beneficiary poultry farmers across the country. Further, 1,200 poultry battery cages were procured to be distributed to 1,200 female poultry farmers.

 

  1. The Ministry also completed the construction of 10 out of 11 livestock housing units and 11 mechanised boreholes for 11 livestock breeding stations. The Ministry produced a total of 7,700,500 vaccines for the control of poultry and livestock diseases in the country. In all, 27,714,923 animals consisting of birds, livestock and pets were vaccinated against Newcastle disease in poultry, rabies in pets, and anthrax, Peste des Petits and Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia (CBPP) in livestock to protect the livelihood of farmers and employment of its value chain actors.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will continue to support livestock farmers by providing 14,000 breeding stock of small ruminants, 8,000 grower pigs, 5 million broiler day old chicks and 20,000 broiler birds. In addition, the rehabilitation of 14 livestock houses and five staff bungalows in 3 livestock breeding stations will Government will refurbish and equip 10 veterinary laboratories, rehabilitate 6 veterinary clinics and construct 6 veterinary clinics in the 6 new regions.

 

Mechanisation, Irrigation and Water Management Programme
  1. Speaker, to improve farmers timely access to appropriate farm machinery and equipment for agricultural production and increased productivity, the Ministry continued with the distribution of various subsidised farm machinery and equipment (tractors, thresher, maize shellers, planters, boom sprayers) to over 150 individual farmers, Farmer-Based Organisations and service providers. To effectively handle the agricultural machinery, over 200 tractors and combine harvester operators, and mechanics were trained at Adidome and Wenchi Farm Mechanisation Centres.

 

 

  1. Speaker, 1,000 units of handheld motorised rice reapers (harvesters) were distributed to the 16 Regional Departments of Agriculture for distribution to selected 247 rice farmer groups to enhance the mechanisation of paddy rice harvesting. By end of 2021, the Ministry will take delivery of a range of agricultural machinery and equipment, including combine harvesters and processing equipment worth US$29.9 million under the 3rd and final tranche of the “More Food Programme” to boost the development of agriculture mechanisation.

 

  1. Speaker, to ensure all-year-round crop production, the Ministry continued with the rehabilitation and modernisation of various irrigation projects which, when completed, will make available a total irrigation area of 6,766ha. The projects are Kpong Irrigation Scheme (2,176ha), Tono Irrigation Scheme (2,490ha) and Kpong Left Bank Irrigation Project (2,100ha) which are at 93 percent, 97 percent and 90 percent stage of completion, respectively. Other Irrigation projects at Tamne in the Upper East Region and Mprumem in the Central Region which will provide a total of 375ha for rice and vegetable production are at 75 percent and 99 percent stage of completion, respectively.

 

  1. Speaker, to complement the “One-Village-One-Dam” initiative, the Ministry completed procurement processes to develop the irrigable areas of 6 out of the 10 completed small dams at Kataa and Duong in the Upper West Region; Vunania in the Upper East Region; Sangbaa in the Northern Region; as well as Kachilende and Sunyeri in the Savannah Region. This will make an additional 144ha available for irrigation. Rehabilitation and modernisation are expected to improve water use efficiency.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will complete ongoing construction works on the Kpong Irrigation Scheme, the Tono Irrigation Scheme, the Kpong Left Bank Irrigation Project, the Mprumem Phase II Irrigation Project and the Ashaiman Irrigation The Ministry will commence and complete Tamne Phase III which will make 800ha available for the development and production of horticultural crops for export. It is estimated that 15,000 farmers will benefit from the facility.

 

  1. The Ministry will also undertake the following irrigation projects: rehabilitation of Ohawu Agricultural College Dam; construction of the remaining 4 small earth dams to complement the 1V1D initiative; construction of additional 12 small earth dams at: Chabaa, Gilang, Tousal Jayiri in the Upper West Region; Benatabe and Sandema Nyansa in the Upper East Region; Batanyili, Jana Kpeng, Jangua, Nanton Kurugu and Tasundo in the Northern Region; as well as Dole and Sunyeri in the Savannah Region.

 

  1. Speaker, in support of the “One District One Warehouse” intervention, the Ministry initiated the construction of 30 warehouses. As at end September 2021,
  • out of the 30 warehouses have been completed. The remaining 7 are scheduled for completion by end of 2021. This initiative will make available 30,000mt of storage capacity to accommodate anticipated increased production under the PFJ

 

  1. Speaker, the Ministry continued to increase surveillance on Fall Army Worm (FAW) infestation across the country. During the period under review, a total of 97,000 litres and 14,000 kg strategic stocks of insecticides were procured and distributed to all 16 regions for FAW management. A total of 66,099ha was sprayed and recovered through this intervention.

 

  1. As part of efforts to rear natural enemies for biological control of FAW, 15 sites were selected in the Central Region for rearing and release of three million As at August 2021, a total of 80,000 active mass of parasitoids were reared and released.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will procure 40,000 litres and 6,000kg of insecticides for control of FAW. Additionally, 20 plant clinics will be established in the Ahafo, Ashanti and Bono East Regions to enhance management of biological control of the FAW.

 

Agribusiness Development Programme
  1. Speaker, the Ministry completed the establishment of a 100-kit commercial greenhouse production unit at Dawhenya. Additionally, as at end June 2021, 60 graduates had completed training in greenhouse technology at the three Training Centres. This brings the total cumulative number of graduates trained since 2018 to 536 made up of 396 males and 140 females.

 

  1. Speaker, the Savannah Zone Agricultural Productivity Improvement Project (SAPIP), in collaboration with the Department of Feeder Roads, is constructing roads passing through ten communities in seven MMDAs. The construction of these farm tracks and feeder roads are at various stages of completion in the following localities:
    • Tali-Kuli-Lungbun feeder road (11.5km) at Tolon in the Northern Region;
    • Sanzee, Kudjoe Abimash farm road (6km) at Mion in the Northern Region;
    • Gunmo-Kochim-Nwodua feeder road (5.8km) at Kumbungu in the Northern Region;
    • Sandu-Chankpem Junction-Sandu-Chankpem (3.3km) in the Nanton District of Northern Region;
    • Walewale-Tianoba-Bugyapaala-Boakudo (15.9km) in the West Mamprusi District of the North East Region;
    • Damango-Kpiri (8km) in the West Gonja District of the Northern Region; and

 

  • Zamsa-Gobsa-Chansa Feeder road (7.1km) in the Builsa South District of the Upper East

 

Sustainable Management of Land and Environment Programme
  1. Speaker, under this Programme, Government, through the “Savannah Zone Agriculture Productivity Improvement Project” (SAPIP) and the “Savannah Improvement Programme” (SIP), is promoting the use of natural resources for agricultural production in the Northern Savannah Ecological Zone.

 

  1. SAPIP supported participating farmers of conservation agriculture with five planters and five boom sprayers as part of an effort to reduce drudgery in farming in 2021. To provide mechanisation services to participating farmers, the project procured the following machinery: 13 combine harvesters; 20 rippers; 10 bailers; 10 seed drills; and 10 fertilizer Additionally, three diesel and one solar powered rice mills were procured to support rice processing in the Savannah Zone. This is expected to boost domestic rice production.

 

  1. Furthermore, capacities of 114 commercial farmers, farm managers, tractor and bulldozer operators were built on climate-smart land clearing, land levelling and seedbed

 

COCOA SECTOR

Cocoa Pricing and Production
  1. Speaker, international prices of cocoa continue to be low. Despite the introduction of the Living Income Differential (LID) pricing mechanism by Ghana and Cote d’Ivoire, receipts from cocoa have dwindled because of the disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and suppression of international prices for cocoa. As a result, Government continues to forfeit its share of the net FOB price of cocoa in terms of export duty payments.

 

  1. Government, nonetheless, has kept faith with our cherished cocoa farmers. Producer price was increased by 28 percent to GH¢10,560 per tonne during the 2019/20 season and maintained at that level for the 2021/22 season in the face of cocoa prices being held down at the international

 

  1. The trend in Ghana’s cocoa production has turned in a positive direction. In the just-ended 2020/21 season, total production reached an all-time high of 1,045,500 tonnes, a 34.82 percent increase over the output for the previous The crop outturn for 2021/2022 season which opened in October 2021, is expected to be above 900,000 tonnes.

 

  1. The increase in production is predominantly due to the vigorous implementation of the Productivity Enhancement Programmes (PEPs) over the past three

 

Implementation of these programmes at scale has been aided by the AfDB/Credit Suisse facility of US$600 million which was secured in 2019.

 

  1. The PEPs comprise:
    • a rehabilitation programme that entails the cutting and replanting of diseased and moribund farms with compensation being paid to affected farmers and land owners;
    • a pilot irrigation project, to be scaled up, that will guarantee availability of year round soil moisture for cocoa farmers and year round harvesting;
    • hand/artificial pollination that enhances pod load on cocoa trees and improves productivity over a limited land area;
    • COCOBOD-led mass pruning and good farm maintenance to boost flower development and productivity;
    • increased and cost-effective access to fertilizers for soil fertility improvement and management under the cocoa Hi-tech programme; and
    • effective control of pests and diseases through the Cocoa Pest and Disease Control (CODAPEC)

 

Loan Syndication
  1. Speaker, for the 2020/2021 crop year, COCOBOD raised a syndicated loan of US$1.3 billion to fund cocoa purchasing operations and support other key activities in the cocoa sector. Despite the disruptions on the international cocoa market brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic, COCOBOD repaid this facility, two months ahead of schedule. This was achieved through prudent financial management.

 

  1. For the 2021/2022 season, an amount of US$1.5 billion has been secured by COCOBOD for cocoa purchasing operations at a margin of LIBOR plus 110 basis Effective negotiations by COCOBOD’s management, coupled with the easing of liquidity constraints on the international financial market, contributed to the reduction in the margin for this syndicated loan facility. The facility is expected to be repaid over a seven-month period from February to August 2022.

 

Digitisation of Cocoa
  1. Speaker, COCOBOD commenced the digitisation of the cocoa sector through the implementation of the Cocoa Management System (CMS). The CMS is a comprehensive integrated digital database that captures farm information including polygon maps and physical conditions of farms, farmer household information, inputs and services supplied as well as farm activities and management to aid planning and policy.

 

  1. The project was started in the 2020/2021 crop year and data capture and validation in the Western and Ashanti Regions was completed in August It will be continued in the other cocoa growing regions during the 2021/2022

 

season. When completed, the system will deploy digital technologies for payments to farmers and stakeholders, aid the implementation of the Farmers’ Pension Scheme, assist in monitoring and provision of timeous information on climate change and land use changes, and effectuate the overall operations of COCOBOD.

 

Job Creation in the Cocoa Sector
  1. Speaker, through the implementation of the various cocoa sector programmes, that is, rehabilitation and replanting, mass spraying, fertilizer application, hand pollination, mass pruning, cocoa farm irrigation and farmer database implementation, about 130,000 jobs were created. This is in line with Government’s objective to direct youthful energies into productive ventures, stem the tide of rural-urban migration and improve livelihoods across the country.

 

Cote d’Ivoire-Ghana Cocoa Initiative
  1. The Ghana-Cote d’Ivoire cooperation in cocoa was initiated by H.E. President Akufo-Addo and his counterpart, H.E. President Alassane Ouattara of Cote d’Ivoire, with the aim of providing a common platform for the two largest producers of cocoa in the world to develop common solutions for achieving optimal prices on the international market, and articulate common positions regarding cocoa issues on the international Some African cocoa producing countries have expressed interest to join the Initiative.

 

  1. Speaker, the Charter governing the Initiative and the Headquarters Agreement were ratified by this august House in December 2020, which then paved way for the signing of the Headquarters Agreement. By this Charter, Accra is the permanent Headquarters of the Initiative and Cote d’Ivoire appoints an Executive Secretary. The Secretariat was duly established in Accra.

 

  1. Through the Ghana-Cote d’Ivoire cooperation, the two countries successfully introduced the LID of US$400 per tonne on cocoa purchased to shore up farmers’

 

Domestic Cocoa Processing and value addition
  1. Speaker, aligned with Government’s policy of industrialising Ghana and moving more into processing and manufacturing, COCOBOD secured a revolving working capital funding of US$200 million to support qualified local indigenous processors.

 

  1. In order to facilitate small scale cocoa processing and manufacture of chocolate and other cocoa based products, COCOBOD is developing regulations and guidelines for small scale and artisanal cocoa processing. The regulation will provide a conducive environment for micro and medium scale Ghanaian

 

enterprises and entrepreneurs to invest in cocoa processing and local value addition for the domestic and export markets.

 

Cocoa Roads
  1. Speaker, the Cocoa Roads Improvement Programme (CRIP) is playing a pivotal role in infrastructure improvement in cocoa growing communities. To this end, Government, through COCOBOD, allocated an amount of GH¢456.6 million to continue with the CRIP in the 2020/2021 cocoa season. For the current 2021/22 season, an amount of GH¢400 million has been earmarked by COCOBOD for the programme. This is to ease cocoa evacuation from the hinterlands to the take-over centres and improve livelihoods in cocoa farming areas.

 

Cocoa Farmers Pension Scheme and other Support Schemes
  1. The implementation of the Cocoa Farmers’ Pension Scheme in fulfilment of Section 26(1) of the Ghana Cocoa Board Act 1984, PNDCL 84, took off in 2021. This is a contributory pension scheme and COCOBOD will provide a matching contribution of 5 For the 2021/2022 crop year, COCOBOD has budgeted GH¢74.59 million to meet its obligation under the Scheme.

 

  1. Speaker, the inclusion of workers in the informal sector, such as cocoa farmers, in the new three-tier pension scheme will enable them save towards their retirement or old age. This will guarantee income security and improved living standards in their old age, and will also serve as motivation for the youth to take up cocoa farming.

 

Coffee Programme
  1. Speaker, to ensure the long-term sustainability of coffee production, reforms to improve the internal marketing environment of coffee were pursued to guarantee coffee farmers ready market and remunerative prices. In the 2020/2021 crop season, COCOBOD made a budgetary allocation of GH¢2.27 million to support activities in the coffee sector. This allocation included raising of the annual target of five million improved coffee seedlings for free distribution to farmers.

 

  1. An amount of GH¢2.08 million was earmarked to support coffee activities in 2021/2022. The objective is to continue with the free distribution of coffee seedlings to facilitate the growth of young plants and improve the productivity of mature coffee In addition, coffee farmers will continue to enjoy extension services from COCOBOD.

 

The Shea Programme
  1. Speaker, scientific research on the shea plant is supported by Government through regular funding as part of efforts to make shea a reliable income generating produce. The work by COCOBOD led to a reduction in the gestation

 

period of the shea plant from over 20 years to an average of three years. With this scientific breakthrough, Government is embarking on a programme to promote the cultivation of shea in the north, just as cocoa in the south, to transform the local economies of the shea regions.

 

MINISTRY OF FISHERIES AND AQUACULTURE DEVELOPMENT

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Aquaculture Development Programme
  1. Speaker, the Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture Development continued with the implementation of the Aquaculture for Food and Jobs (AFJ) Initiative, in 2021, and constructed 24 aquaculture facilities at Ve-Golokwati, Akpafu, Mempeasem, and Osei Tutu Senior High School, bringing the total aquaculture holding facilities under the Initiative to 180. In 2022, the AFJ Initiative is expected to produce 116.64mt of fish as well as provide 270 direct and 675 indirect jobs.

 

  1. In 2021, the Ministry constructed two hatcheries at Sefwi Wiawso in the Western North Region and Dormaa Ahenkro in the Bono Region. In 2022, the two newly constructed hatcheries will be equipped for the production and supply of good quality fingerlings to fish farmers. In addition, the existing public hatcheries at Kona Odumase in the Ashanti Region and Ashaiman in the Greater Accra Region were upgraded. These interventions will help produce an estimated 1.2 million quality fingerlings in 2022.

 

  1. The Ministry procured 17,440 bags of assorted fish feed to be distributed to fish farmers across the country to stimulate private sector investment in the aquaculture industry. With these interventions, aquaculture production for the year is expected to increase by 30 percent from 64,000mt in 2020 to 83,150mt by end of 2021 and by an additional 8 percent to 92,135mt in 2022.

 

Fisheries Resource Management Programme
  1. Speaker, research over the years has proven that marine fish resources are declining and sardinellas, anchovies and demersal species are over-exploited. To reverse this trend and restore the stocks to sustainable levels, a one-month closed season was observed for the artisanal and inshore fleets from 1st to 31st July, 2021, and a two-month season for industrial vessels from 1st July to 31st August, 2021. Implementation is expected to continue in subsequent years with a view to achieving the desired long-term objective of stock recovery and rebuilding.

 

  1. To mitigate the immediate impact of fishers while observing the closed season, especially in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Ministry distributed 15,000 bags of rice and 6,250 cartons of cooking oil as livelihood relief items to marine artisanal and in-shore fishers.

 

 

  1. Speaker, access to fishing inputs at affordable prices is key to enhancing the operations of fishers in the country. In line with this, the Ministry continued to partner with other agencies and the private sector under the Fisheries lnput Support Scheme to provide 6,000 outboard motors and 6,000 pieces of authorised fishing gears. In addition, the Ministry facilitated the regular supply of 69,457,500 litres of premix fuel to all the 308 landing beaches across the country. The incidence of diversion of premix fuel has reduced steadily over the years and to consolidate that, the Ministry will automate the distribution of premix fuel in 2022.

 

  1. To consolidate the gains made from the implementation of the National Marine Fisheries Management Plan (2015-2019), a new Marine Management Plan was developed to replace the expired plan. In 2022, the implementation of the plan will commence. Additionally, the Ministry will start the processes towards the development of a similar plan for the inland

 

  1. Speaker, the Ministry validated 10,000 identification cards for marine artisanal canoes for distribution to fishers. This will be linked to the automation of premix fuel distribution in 2022. In addition, 4,000 cards for the marine subsector will be printed for distribution.

 

Fisheries Law Enforcement
  1. Speaker, as part of efforts at preparing a new Fisheries Act to replace the existing Fisheries Act, 2002 (Act 625), the Ministry reviewed the National Fisheries and Aquaculture Policy developed in 2008 to incorporate emerging trends in fisheries and aquaculture management. The reviewed Policy is expected to, among others, address issues of climate change, small-scale fisheries, gender and youth, gear technology, optimise fisheries infrastructural development and promote post-harvest fish management and trade.

 

Aquatic Animal Health and Post-Harvest Management Programme
  1. Speaker, as part of measures to ensure hygienic and safe consumption of fish, the Ministry procured and distributed 50 pieces of Torrymeters across the various beaches to detect the use of chemicals. Forty-six fisheries officers and 30 stakeholders were trained on the use of the device.

 

  1. A total of 360 fish processors and traders were trained on the use of improved fish processing technologies, hygienic handling of fish and group dynamics in the Upper East and West

 

  1. Sixty-five aquaculture establishments in the Ashanti, Central, Eastern and Western Regions were inspected for biosecurity compliance. In addition, 30 stakeholders were trained in biosecurity, disease detection and

 

 

Management and Administration Programme
  1. Ghana, as a member of the Organisation of African, Caribbean and Pacific States (OACPS) will host the 37th Meeting of Ministers-In-Charge of Fisheries and Aquaculture of the OACPS from 5th to 8th April, 2022 in Accra. The meeting is expected to bring together high-level policy makers from OACPS and European Union member states, practitioners and professionals in the field of fisheries and aquaculture to discuss relevant issues relating to the sector, including illegal fishing, climate change and ocean pollution. Ghana stands to benefit from the shared experiences of the participants in addressing some of the pertinent issues in the fisheries sector.

 

MINISTRY OF LANDS AND NATURAL RESOURCES

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022

Forest and Wildlife Development and Management Programme

  1. Speaker, Ghana continues to adopt and implement strategies and projects that focus on increasing forest cover. The overarching goal is to restore degraded forest landscapes through forest plantation development, enrichment planting and trees on farms (farm forestry) by both Government and the private sector.

 

  1. Speaker, under the National Afforestation Programme which encompasses all the landscape restoration models, a total area of 75,170ha out of a target of 80,000ha was planted with suitable tree seedlings. This comprises 14,057ha of new forest plantations, re-establishment of 10,495ha failed areas and planting of trees on 50,618ha farm lands. In addition, 3.7 million seedlings, including Cassia, Cedrela, Emire, Eucalyptus, Gmelina, Kokrodua, Mahogany, Ofram, Teak and Waw species were planted.

 

  1. Speaker, the implementation of the various landscape restoration models provided an opportunity to engage workers. In 2021, the Commission engaged a total of 72,000 persons exceeding the target of 60,000 persons to assist in various areas of planting activities under the National Afforestation Programme (NAP). These include 35,000 persons engaged under the Youth in Afforestation Programme, 17,000 persons under the Modified Taungya System (MTS) and 2,000 persons engaged in seedling production. The private sector also engaged about 18,000 persons nationwide.

 

  1. The Green Ghana Day was organised in accordance with the vision of H.E. The President to restore the forest cover of the country. The Day which is to be celebrated annually seeks to mobilise citizens to undertake massive nationwide tree planting exercises. A total of 7,193,424 tree seedlings were planted nationwide on 11th June, 2021, far exceeding the target of 5,280,000 by over 36

 

 

  1. To enhance timber trade and industry development, the Forestry Commission facilitated the export of 234,247m3 of wood which generated €114.35 million equivalent to GH¢804.20

 

  1. In 2022, the Commission will improve the implementation of the National Afforestation Programme and plant 20 million trees during the 2022 Green Ghana In addition, the Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Licensing System will be fully implemented to assure the international markets that timber produced from Ghana is legally compliant under the Ghana Legality Assurance Scheme. Rapid response teams will also be deployed and conservation education carried out to reduce illegalities in forest reserves and wildlife protected areas.

 

Land Administration and Management Programme
  1. Speaker, to improve the delivery of land related services, the digitisation drive at the Lands Commission is being vigorously pursued. In this regard, an online portal was developed for services such as application for search, stamp duty payment, title registration and plan approval, among others, to be easily accessed. As a result, the Lands Commission can now successfully issue a highly accurate consolidated search report within 14 days.

 

  1. The Lands Commission secured land for the development of the following Government priority projects: the Marine Drive Project in Accra, the Dairy Farms at Danfa-Amrahia and the Afienya Site for Urban Renewal and Industrial Parcels of land at Afienya, Amrahia and Amasaman were also made available to the Ministry of Works and Housing for construction of affordable housing.

 

  1. Speaker, in line with the digitisation agenda of Government, the Office of the Administrator of Stool Lands (OASL) is in the process of digitising its operations to improve stool land administration and revenue mobilisation. To this end, the Office is collaborating with a development partner to design a data management software application. In 2022, OASL will roll out the data management software being developed to the Ashanti and Western Regional Offices and later to other parts of the country.

 

  1. Speaker, in a bid to minimise land disputes in the country, OASL assisted traditional authorities at Kong in the Savannah Region, Kukuom in the Ahafo Region and Ngleshie Amanfrom in the Greater Accra Region to establish Customary Land Secretariats in line with the Land Act, 2020 (Act 1036).

 

  1. The Office will facilitate the demarcation of 200 parcels of farm land for small holder farmers and establish five more Customary Land Secretariats to help improve tenure security in land ownership in the It will also step up the

 

public sensitisation drive on radio and television and monitoring of district offices and MMDAs on the use of stool land revenue as stipulated in L.I. 2377.

 

Mineral Resources Development and Management Programme
  1. Speaker, to improve monitoring of small scale mining activities, the Commission is currently piloting the installation of tracking devices on earth moving and mining equipment at Anyinam in the Atiwa East District of the Eastern Region, and Gyapa in the Wassa Amenfi East Municipality of the Western Region.

 

  1. In order to address the challenge of finding economically viable areas to undertake mining activities by small scale miners, the Minerals Commission has identified six fields with a total area of 150 km2 to be geologically investigated to determine their mineral potential for small-scale mining operations. These areas are expected to provide over 1,400 small scale concessions capable of generating approximately 500,000 direct

 

  1. Speaker, an operational manual and training on best practices in mining was developed by the Commission to support community mining schemes and encourage responsible and sustainable small scale mining. A total of 26 community mining concessions were supported with mercury-free gold processing plants in line with the Minamata Convention. This will create about 30,000 direct and indirect jobs to curb the menace of illegal mining.

 

  1. In 2022, the Minerals Commission will undertake further geological investigations of blocked-out areas to ensure additional viable areas are available for allocation to small scale The Commission will launch 100 community mining concessions expected to create over 150,000 direct and indirect jobs. In addition, the Commission will continue to facilitate the ratification of new mining leases that will be granted by Government and increase the list of locally procured items on the Local Content Procurement list from 29 to 34 to ensure that the benefits of mining are retained for socio-economic growth and development of the localities.

 

  1. In 2022, the Minerals Commission will procure drones, patrol boats, tracking devices, operational vehicles and recruit river guards to enhance monitoring of mining operations in order to reduce the menace of illegal mining and pollution of

 

  1. Speaker, in September 2021, H.E. The President launched four key projects under the Integrated Aluminium Industry (IAI). These projects collectively, define the full scope of the upstream part of the IAI and will ensure the full exploitation and value addition to Ghana’s 900 million tonnes of bauxite reserves at Awaso in the Western North Region, Nyinahin and Mpasaaso, in the Ashanti Region and Kyebi in the Eastern Region.

 

 

  1. The Ghana Integrated Aluminium Development Corporation (GIADEC) selected Rocksure International as the strategic partner for the development of a five million tonne bauxite mine and a refinery at Nyinahin-Mpasaaso.

 

  1. Speaker, following the concerns raised by some CSOs about mining in Atiwa, the Corporation, in collaboration with EPA, commissioned a biodiversity and hydrological baseline study for Atiwa in 2020. The draft report was completed and GIADEC will develop an action plan based on the final report, to guide the strategic and operational decisions of the Corporation regarding the delivery of the Integrated Aluminum Industry in Kyebi. The Corporation will also develop similar fact-based action plans for all the other mining locations in collaboration with all stakeholders and partners.

 

  1. Government’s investment in VALCO coupled with buoyant market prices resulted in a reported EBIDA of about US$4 million as at September 2021, the first time in a decade. As a result, VALCO was able to increase its maintenance budget resulting in plant stability, operational uptime and significant cost

 

  1. Speaker, in 2022, GIADEC will complete the prospecting of the bauxite concessions in collaboration with selected partners and begin to develop the structures which will establish the mines and refineries. The Corporation will continue to work with VALCO to stabilise its operations and attract the necessary investments into the business to drive efficiency and performance.

 

  1. Speaker, Ghana Integrated Iron and Steel Development Corporation (GIISDEC) is developing an Iron and Steel Master Plan to guide the development of the Iron and Steel Industry. A draft report was completed and is being reviewed by a technical committee.

 

  1. GIISDEC is in the process of acquiring a consultant to undertake Mineral Resource Estimate (MRE) of new deposits of iron ore discovered at Santrokofi-Akpafu in the Oti-Region. In addition, the Corporation engaged Messrs Sable Metals Platinum and Sahara Natural Resources to validate mineral resource data for the Sheini and Opon Manso iron ore deposit sites respectively. The Corporation has received draft final reports for

 

  1. In 2022, GIISDEC will intensify its community engagement processes to bring all stakeholders on board. The Corporation will also undertake mineral resource estimate on iron ore deposits and undertake investor engagement processes to secure an investor to partner in developing the integrated iron and steel plant in

 

MINISTRY OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Industrial Development Programme
  1. Speaker, the Government’s current industrial development programme is anchored on the One District One Factory (1D1F) Programme which is arguably one of the most innovative and comprehensive programmes for industrial development ever to have been implemented in our economic development history.

 

  1. Speaker, despite the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, remarkable success continues to be achieved under this initiative. A total of 278 1D1F projects are at various stages of implementation, out of which 106 factories are operational, 148 are under construction while 24 projects are being prepared. The companies that are currently operational have created a total of 156,782 direct and indirect jobs, 17,451 of which were created in 2021. It is expected that the completion of the 1D1F projects currently under construction and in the pipeline will create additional 131,817 direct and indirect jobs in 134 districts across the country.

 

  1. Speaker, the youth have not been left out of the 1D1F Programme. Under the Enable Youth 1D1F Initiative, which is supported by two development partners, 58 of the 278 projects are fully owned by youth groups mobilised by Government and supported with seed funding to establish their own state-of-the- art agro-processing factories in 58 districts. Each of these companies has between 40 and 48 individuals as shareholders.

 

  1. In addition, five medium scale, state-of-the-art agro-processing common-user facilities have been established and are owned by groups of farmers in five districts namely Dormaa West, Savelugu, Sefwi Akontonbra, Sekyere Central and Tarkwa Nsuaem.

 

  1. Speaker, the regional distribution of the 278 1D1F projects are indicated in Table 23 below:

 

Table 23: Regional Distribution of 1D1F Projects

Region

Number        of                        1D1F Projects

Ahafo Region

5

Ashanti Region

54

Bono East Region

10

Bono Region

19

Central Region

19

Eastern Region

37

 

 

Region

Number        of                        1D1F Projects

Greater Accra Region

76

North-East Region

3

Northern Region

6

Oti Region

3

Savanna Region

4

Upper East Region

7

Upper West Region

6

Volta Region

13

Western Region

11

Western North Region

5

Source: MoTI

 

  1. Speaker, Government has successfully mobilised loans totaling GH¢2.69 billion for 1D1F companies from the Participating Financial Institutions over the implementation period. This facility has been leveraged through an amount of GH¢269 million disbursed by Government to de-risk loans and support interest payments.

 

  1. Speaker, since the inception of the 1D1F Initiative, Parliament has granted approval for exemptions from import duty for the importation of machinery, equipment and industrial raw materials to 37 1D1F Projects made up of 14 existing projects being expanded or upgraded, and 23 new projects.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will support 45 additional 1D1F projects, bringing the cumulative number of projects at various stages of implementation to 323. A special seed financing intervention will be implemented to support districts without active business promoters to establish at least 16 1D1F

 

  1. Speaker, the Ghana Free Zones Authority remains the anchor for the Government’s Industrial Parks and Special Economic Zones (SEZs) and continues to achieve positive results. In 2021, Free Zone enterprises generated total export revenue of US$424.61 million. Capital investments by Free Zone enterprises amounted to US$75.39 million and a total of 30,189 jobs were created, mainly in the manufacturing sector.

 

  1. Speaker, proprietary studies on the flagship Greater Kumasi Industrial City and Special Economic Zone Project, which is linked to the Boankra Inland Port, were completed. In addition, an environmental and social impact assessment was initiated under the Ghana Economic Transformation Project. The Ministry also

 

initiated the process to develop a policy framework and regulatory and institutional mechanisms for SEZs. These will be completed for approval in 2022.

 

  1. Speaker, Government’s Strategic Anchor Industries Initiative comprise three distinct programmes, namely: Ghana Automotive Development; Garment and Textiles; and Pharmaceutical Industries.

 

  1. Under the Vehicle Assembly and Automotive Industry component of the Ghana Automotive Development Programme, Toyota Tsusho Manufacturing Company commissioned an assembly plant in June 2021 to assemble Toyota and Suzuki brands of vehicles – Hilux Pickup and Suzuki Swift – in Ghana. Four new vehicle assembly plants in Ghana, namely Nissan, KIA, Hyundai and Renault are also expected to commence commercial production in 2022.

 

  1. Volkswagen commenced commercial production in Ghana in August 2020, and continued in 2021 to assemble Teramont, Tiguan, Amarok, Passat and Polo Kantanka Automobile Company Limited also stepped up production of the made-in-Ghana vehicle models: Nkunimdie SUV, Omama Pickup, Onantefo 4×4 Pickup/SUV, Otumfuo SUV and K71 Small SUV. Similarly, Sinotruck is assembling Tipper Trucks, Oil Tankers, Trailer Heads, Water Tankers, CIMC Flatbed and Wheel Loaders.

 

  1. Speaker, building local capacity for the sustainable long-term development of the Automotive Industry is a key priority of Government. In this regard, the Ministry will complete the establishment of an Automotive Development Support Centre in 2022 to promote innovative vehicle financing, regulate vehicle standards, and facilitate the domestication of the industry through the local manufacture of components, parts and accessories by SMEs to supply local assemblers.

 

  1. In line with the Ghana Automotive Development Policy, an Automotive Industry Development Council Bill, which will soon be submitted to Parliament for consideration and approval, will establish a consultative body for stakeholders to effectively address any issues of concern that arise from the implementation of the The policy will also foster cooperation to deepen local content through the participation of domestic SMEs in the automobile assembly and components manufacturing value chains.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will continue to implement project interventions under the Strategic Anchor Industries Initiative to enhance production capacity of selected companies and reforms to improve the competitiveness of the Garments and Textiles Sector and the Pharmaceutical Industry. In 2022, Government will consider an extension of the tax exempt period of the Garments and Textiles

 

 

Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises Development
  1. Speaker, following the enactment of the Ghana Enterprises Agency Act, 2020 (Act 1043), H.E. The President launched the Ghana Enterprises Agency (GEA) in June 2021. The Agency is mandated to serve as the umbrella body for the development of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs) in Ghana.

 

  1. Under the Coronavirus Alleviation Programme Business Support Scheme (CAPBuSS), Ghana Enterprises Agency provided 302,001 successful applicants with loans amounting to GH¢523.11 Out of the total number of beneficiaries, 208,381 were females while the remaining 93,620 were males.

 

  1. The Agency is also implementing a COVID-19 Recovery and Resilience Programme financed by Mastercard Foundation, to support MSMEs in the formal and informal sectors. As at August, 2021, a total of GH¢22.1 million grants and GH¢12 million loans were disbursed to 15,248 beneficiaries.

 

  1. To improve the capacity for MSMEs, the Agency provided 141,295 enterprises with business development A total of 116,189 women were provided with business development services, and 57,657 enterprises participated in financial literacy programmes. Additionally, 1,332 MSMEs were provided with Japanese Kaizen training to improve efficiency.

 

  1. Speaker, under the Rural Enterprise Programme, the Ministry, in collaboration with GEA, supported 37 Business Resource Centres (BRCs) to become fully operational with a total client base of 10,653 SMEs. An additional 26 BRCs under construction are 80 percent complete, while 4 new Technology Solution Centres (TSCs) have been completed at Elmina, Hohoe, Kumawu and Savelugu. In addition, 21 TSCs were refurbished across the country. These decentralised business development and technology service providers will offer critical support to young entrepreneurs, existing SMEs and the new industries being established under the 1D1F Programme.

 

Standards and Conformity Assessment Programme
  1. Speaker, the Ministry received Cabinet approval for the revised Ghana Standards Authority (GSA) Bill, soon to be presented to Parliament. In 2022, the GSA will draft the Ghana National Accreditation Service Bill and the National Quality Policy. The Accreditation Service Bill will provide an internationally recognised and effective accreditation system for conformity assessment. The National Quality Policy will ensure that goods and services emanating from or traded in Ghana meet quality standards.

 

  1. In addition, GSA will implement nationwide calibration of medical devices, develop National Hydrocarbons Standards, and establish a Metrology Laboratory to provide services to the Oil and Gas

 

Trade Development Programme
  1. Speaker, under the National Export Development Strategy (NEDS), a number of value-added products and commodities were selected for enhanced production and export. NEDS was launched in 2021 to increase Non-Traditional Exports to US$25 billion over a 10-year period. In this regard, pineapple and coconut exports received a big boost from the Ghana Export Promotion Authority, which provided a total of 18.4 million pineapple suckers and 500,000 coconut seedlings to farmers and out-growers in the Central, Eastern, Western, and Volta Regions.

 

  1. Speaker, trading under the African Continental Free Trade Agreement (AfCFTA) commenced on 1st January, 2021, and Ghana was the first country in Africa to establish Customs Procedure Codes to facilitate trading under AfCFTA. A comprehensive National Policy and Action Plan, that includes an Enterprise Support Programme aimed at assisting medium-to-large scale companies in Ghana to export to the AfCFTA Market, was developed and is being implemented. To this end, 180 companies were identified to receive support to export to markets under the AfCFTA and other preferential trade agreement areas.

 

Business Regulatory Reforms
  1. Speaker, Ghana seeks to become the most business-friendly country in Africa as part of the industrial transformation agenda. In furtherance of this objective, Government has developed a comprehensive Business Regulatory Reforms (BRR) Programme coordinated by the Ministry, which is being implemented in collaboration with over 40 MDAs and regulatory institutions.

 

MINISTRY OF TOURISM, ARTS AND CULTURE

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Management and Administration Programme
  1. Speaker, under the auspices of H.E. The President, the Ministry of Tourism, Arts and Culture launched the Domestic and Regional Tourism Campaign dubbed “#ExperienceGhana, #ShareGhana” on 1st June, 2021 to stimulate the tourism industry into action. The launch was part of the grand programme “See Ghana, Eat Ghana, Wear Ghana, Feel Ghana” Campaign to propel development of the Sector.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will embark on the implementation of activities enlisted under the “See Ghana, Eat Ghana, Wear Ghana, Feel Ghana” Campaign to realise its global

 

  1. The Ministry, in collaboration with its stakeholders, celebrated the Emancipation Day and PANAFEST in Accra and Cape Coast from 26th July to 1st August, 2021, attracting over 1,000 participants. In 2022, the Ministry will organise special events such as paragliding during the PANAFEST/Emancipation Day

 

  1. Speaker, the Ministry has drawn up a proposal for the celebration of a “National Kente and Smock Day” to promote the use of Kente and Smock across the globe. The Ministry will organise the inaugural edition of this laudable programme in 2022.

 

Tourism Product Development Programme
  1. Speaker, the Ministry, in collaboration with stakeholders, organised the “Chocolate Week”, previously called “Chocolate Day”, from 14th-21st February, 2021, under the theme, “Eat Chocolate, Stay Healthy, Grow Ghana”. In 2022, the Ministry, in collaboration with its Agencies and other stakeholders, will organise the annual National Chocolate Week in all the 16 regions from 14th-21st February, 2022. There will be distribution of chocolate and other cocoa products to citizens at some selected locations across the country to promote the consumption of locally produced cocoa products.

 

  1. Construction works on tourism projects are ongoing at the Axim Receptive Facility and the Bonwire Kente Museum. Two regional offices for the Ghana Tourism Authority were established at Damongo and Techiman. The Wa and Tamale regional offices were also rehabilitated. In 2022, the Ministry will continue with the construction of the Axim Receptive Facility and the Bonwire Kente Museum as well as the rehabilitation of the regional offices.
Tourism Research and Marketing Programme
  1. Speaker, the Ministry and the Ghana Tourism Authority (GTA) completed a survey on international air travellers and the 2020 Tourism Enterprise Directory Report. In addition, a survey on the impact of COVID-19 on tourism enterprises was completed and processed for publication. The recommendations from the 2021 report on the impact of COVID-19 on tourism enterprises will be implemented in 2022 to ensure improvement and increase in the patronage of tourist sites and attractions in Ghana.

 

  1. In 2022, the latest edition of the Manpower data and Hotel Occupancy Rate reports on the tourism sector will be updated and

 

  1. The GTA collaborated with the Ghana Immigration Service to update data on international arrivals which revealed that 411,164 visitors arrived in the country by end of the third quarter of 2021. Within the same period, 235,391 domestic visitors to tourism sites were recorded. In 2022, the Authority projects an increase in international arrivals to 554,052, and domestic visitation to 370,741.

 

  1. The Social Media Domestic and Regional Tourism Campaign was launched successfully in The implementation of activities under the campaign resulted in the participation of 16,397 followers with the breakdown below:
    • #ExperienceGhana – 6,034;
    • #ShareGhana – 1,971;
    • #ExperienceGhanaShareGhana – 952;
    • #SeeEatWearFeelGhana – 773;
    • #TravelShareWin – 868; and
    • #DiscoverGhana – 5,799.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry, in partnership with its Agencies, will continue to use social media to promote domestic tourism across the country.

 

Tourism Quality Assurance Programme
  1. Speaker, the Hotel, Catering and Tourism Training Institute (HOTCATT) employed an aggressive publicity strategy to increase awareness and visibility of the institution to its target market and the general public to revive their interest and participation in the institute’s business and training programmes. In line with this, about 150 students from various institutions received training at the basic, intermediary and supervisory levels to upgrade their skills and competences.

 

  1. In 2022, HOTCATT will train over 1,000 persons and continue with its publicity drive in the various media channels to attract individuals and institutions for business and capacity building for the sector.

 

  1. Speaker, the Ministry, through GTA conducted inspections and licensing of tourism enterprises to improve the quality of service delivery within the sector. In 2021, a total of 9,900 establishments (Accommodation 3,720, Travel Trade 348, Food, Beverage and Entertainment 5,832) were inspected and licensed. In addition, 183 units were registered as new establishments by end of September 2021.

 

  1. Speaker, the Ministry, through GTA, launched the Visit Ghana App as part of the Industry Single Window Project to provide industry information and collate relevant data. In 2022, the Ministry will continue to conduct inspections and license tourism establishments and enterprises through the GTA to ensure quality service delivery within the sector.

 

  1. Speaker, the Ministry, in collaboration with GTA, embarked on a “Seek and Find” exercise on illegal tourism enterprises in the Greater Accra Region. In this regard, the Authority identified 289 establishments that were operating without license. In 2022, the Ministry, together with GTA, will further embark on “Seek and Find” exercises to search for illegal tourist enterprise operators to register and formalise their businesses with the sector accordingly.

 

 

Culture, Creative Arts and Heritage Management Programme
  1. Speaker, the Ministry, in collaboration with the Kwame Nkrumah Memorial Park, re-enacted the Declaration of Independence on 5th March, 2021, and will re-enact it in 2022.

 

  1. The Ministry, through the W.E.B Du Bois Memorial Centre and in collaboration with the African American Association of Ghana (AAAG), observed the celebration of the Black History Month from 2nd-8th February, The event attracted more than 400 participants comprising students, African-Americans, the Caribbeans and the general public. This event reassures the current generation especially the youth that indeed the Blackman is capable of governing and managing his own affairs. The Ministry, through the Centre will continue with the tradition in 2022.

 

  1. The Ministry, in collaboration with the Green Butterfly Vending Group of Accra and the E.B Du Bois Centre, observed the African Union Day under the theme: “Arts, Culture and Heritage: Levers for Building the Africa we want” from the 24th- 30th May, 2021. In 2022, the Ministry will again organise and celebrate the African Union Day.

 

  1. Speaker, H.E. The President launched the Presidential Film Pitch Series (PFPS) in April 2021 to foster improved innovation among film industry players. In 2022, a programme will be held to create the needed platform for Ghanaian filmmakers.

 

  1. The Ghana Museums and Monuments Board re-opened the Ho Museum and Ussher Fort after about four years of closure. In 2022, these two historical sites will be used to enhance the tourism

 

MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT, SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Management and Administration Programme
  1. Speaker, the Ministry of Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation continued with the incentive payment system for e-waste collection at Old Fadama (Agbogbloshie). Over 82 tonnes of e-waste cables and 30 tonnes of waste in mixed batteries were purchased.

 

  1. The Ministry will introduce the purchase of Cathode-Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Thermoplastics before end-2021, while working assiduously to hand over these accumulated e-waste types to accredited recycling companies for sound In 2022, the construction of a handover centre and temporary storage facility for e-waste at the premises of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) will be completed.

 

 

  1. The Ministry, in collaboration with the Ministry of Sanitation and Water Resources and the Ministry of Local Government, Decentralisation and Rural Development, set up a technical committee to develop a roadmap for plastic waste management to be piloted in selected communities in the Greater Accra Metropolitan Area. Implementation of the proposals will commence in 2022 with support from the National Plastic Waste Recycling

 

  1. Parliament on 7thJuly, 2021 ratified the Bilateral Cooperation Agreement between the Government of Ghana and the Swiss Government towards the implementation of Article 6 of the Paris Agreement towards meeting Ghana’s Nationally Determined Contributions to Green Gas emission

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will commence the implementation of the 10-year Bilateral Cooperation on a National Clean Energy Access Programme under which a total emission reduction of 2.0 million Metric Tonnes of Carbon Dioxide will be sold to the Government of

 

Research and Development Programme
  1. Speaker, the Ministry through the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) developed CSIR AgricTech App and Digital Soil Map under Modernising Agriculture in Ghana programme. The application provides web- based access to all soil resources and information on Ghana for agricultural planning, policy-making and technology transfer to ensure food security and efficient land use through sustainable use of the soil resources in Ghana. Further training will be provided in 2022 for Agriculture Extension Officers, farmers, and other stakeholders on how to make use of the platform.

 

  1. Speaker, CSIR was internationally recognised for developing a water quality index for assessing the quality of water bodies, as well as discovering critically endangered frog species in the Atiwa Range Forest Reserve near Sagyimase. This new frog specie with a common name “Atiwa Slippery Frog” was scientifically named “Conraua sagyimase”. In 2022, the CSIR will use this index to assess the water quality in communities, especially in mining areas with contaminated water bodies.

 

  1. In addition, the CSIR, for the first time, developed and released male and female lines of broilers since the inception of the release of the ARIBRO (Animal Research Institute Broiler). Over 1,300 breeder hens and 300 breeder cocks were In addition, 6,023,930 oil palm germinated seeds were produced for the Planting for Export and Rural Development (PERD) Programme, while 55,727 oil palm seedlings and 34,252 coconut seedlings were sold to farmers. In 2022, the CSIR will continue to support the PERD and PFJ initiatives with the production

 

of germinated seedlings for farmers. Day old chicks will also be produced and supplied to farmers under the ARIBRO Project.

 

  1. The Ghana Nuclear Power Programme is being developed based on the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Milestones Framework per international best Out of the three phases of the milestone framework, Ghana completed all Phase 1 technical activities needed to make a knowledgeable commitment to a nuclear programme. Some Phase 2 activities have already started and are at various stages of completion namely: seismic equipment installation and monitoring is 70 percent completed; assessment on national and regional electricity grid network characteristics is 75 percent completed; while assessment on grid interface requirements for Nuclear Power Plants is 45 percent completed.

 

  1. Speaker, a nationwide perception survey which will inform the programme on how to further engage the populace was also completed. In 2022, a nationwide stakeholder involvement programme will be rolled out to enable Ghana Nuclear Power Programme Organisation (GNPPO) reach out to the populace and explain the enormous benefits of a nuclear power project.

 

  1. GAEC issued 809 conditional compliance certificates, in addition to the monitoring of 1,046 Radio Frequency (RF) Base Additionally, 1,997 occupationally- exposed workers involved in using ionizing radiation were monitored, while 256 samples were analysed to ensure that food and water imports are free from radioactive contamination. The Commission will continue with the monitoring and compliance assessments of Radio Frequency (RF) Base Stations and masts in 2022.

 

Environmental Protection and Management Programme
  1. Speaker, the EPA issued 6,129 Environmental Assessment Permits and 29,793 chemical licenses in line with L.I 1652. In addition, 7,395 undertakings were also monitored to ensure compliance. Furthermore, air quality monitoring was undertaken at 8 regulatory and 10 non-regulatory sites, and 85 industries were monitored for effluent quality. Audits were also undertaken on all DVLA testing centres across the country to determine capacity to meet requirements of the regulations to reduce air pollution from vehicles. In 2022, the EPA will continue with the enforcement of laws on environmental protection, especially against open burning of electronic waste.

 

  1. Speaker, leaders of Trade Associations were engaged by EPA to review the rates of the advance eco-levy on the remaining 300 Harmonised System (HS) Codes. The Associations are currently sensitising members on the approved rates for implementation. Resources from the E-waste Fund will be used to commence the full operationalisation of the Integrated National E-waste Management

 

Scheme in 2022. The full operationalisation of the Scheme will lead to the formalisation of the informal sector, and the creation of decent and sustainable jobs along the e-waste value chain.

 

  1. The Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) inspected and authorised 59 facilities to use radiation emitting equipment and radioactive sources and An additional 245 permits were issued for importing, exporting, transporting and storing of radioactive sources and devices to ensure the protection of humans and the environment from the harmful effects of radiation. NRA served enforcement notices to two non-complying facilities to enforce corrective actions and ensure safety of radiation for workers and patients. In 2022, NRA will undertake regulatory inspections and enforcement of radiating emitting facilities, build capacity of staff in specialised areas (ionizing and non-ionizing radiation), as well as embark on public education on radiation matters.

 

Spatial Planning and Human Settlement Programme
  1. Speaker, the Ministry through the Land Use and Spatial Planning Authority (LUSPA) completed the preparation of spatial plans (Structure Plans and Local Plans) for Ghana’s Petroleum Hub area in the Jomoro District. This plan will guide the physical development of Ghana’s Petroleum Hub which is supposed to make Ghana a leader in the petrochemical industry and related services in the West Africa Region. Spatial plans for the Afienya Industrial Area is 80 percent complete. In 2022, LUSPA will train the Regional and District Spatial Planning Committees (RSPCs and DSPCs) on spatial plan preparation.

 

Biotechnology Development Programme
  1. Speaker, the Ministry through the National Biosafety Authority (NBA) conducted series of awareness workshops and meetings for stakeholders on biosafety-related issues. Monitoring and inspection was also conducted for on- going confined field trials. One permit was granted for non-GMO status of cashew nuts for export, while one application on GMO Environmental Release of GMO Bt Cowpea is currently under consideration. In addition, the translation of the Biosafety Act into one local language (Twi) is in progress. The NBA will complete the establishment of a detection laboratory for GMOs to enhance regulation in 2022.

 

MINISTRY OF ENERGY

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022

Power Sector Development and Management Programme

  1. Speaker, Government continues to expand power generation capacity to meet domestic, commercial and industrial needs of customers. In this regard, construction works on the 200MW Phase 1 of the 400MW Early Power Project continued. Construction works for the Stage 1A are 99.7 percent complete and

 

works for the Stage 1B (56MW) combined cycle are 93 percent complete. The Amandi Power Project (200MW Twin City Energy Project) was completed, achieved commercial operation, and is currently dispatching power to the grid. In 2022, a joint venture partner will be engaged to undertake the repowering of the T3 Power Project with VRA.

 

  1. A proposed site was identified at Anwomaso in the Ashanti Region for the Ameri Relocation Project aimed at boosting power supply in the middle and northern parts of the country. Geotechnical and grid impact studies for the project were completed and negotiations with the Engineering, Procurement and Construction (EPC) contractor are In 2022, the Ministry will continue activities on the relocation of the Plant.

 

  1. Speaker, the mobilisation of major construction equipment and facilities to the Pwalugu Multipurpose Dam and Irrigation Project site is also ongoing. Contractors are scheduled to start the construction of access roads and bridges, as well as a camp equipped with water and power supply facilities.

 

Renegotiation of Power Purchase Agreements
  1. Speaker, to ensure power is affordable for industrial, commercial and residential use, the Ministry, in collaboration with key stakeholders, continued with the renegotiation and restructuring of Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs). The exercise is progressing steadily with seven operational Independent Power Producers (IPPs), namely, Karpower, Cenpower, Sunnon Asogli, Early Power, Twin City Energy (formerly Amandi), AKSA Energy and Cenit.

 

  1. The PPAs when finalised will reduce the overall financial burden imposed on Government by the onerous “take or pay” contracts. In this regard, Government is taking a nuanced approach to addressing each contract individually, tailored to the specific peculiarities of each of the seven key IPPs.

 

  1. Government has reached agreements with some IPPs to convert power plants to tolling structures, switch to natural gas, as well as reduce This is expected to result in considerable savings to Government and the nation over the remaining lifespan of the PPAs. These savings are expected to come from a combination of reduced capacity and energy charges across the portfolio.

 

  1. In order to reduce transmission and distribution system losses and also improve transmission system reliability, works on the following projects have steadily progressed:
    • Kumasi-Kintampo Lot of the 330KV Kumasi-Bolgatanga Transmission Line Project is complete and the line has been energised;

 

  • Volta-Achimota Lot of the 161KV Volta-Achimota-Mallam Transmission Line Upgrade Project is 83 percent complete and the Achimota-Mallam segment is 55 percent complete;
  • Pokuase Bulk Supply Point Project is completed, commissioned and in This seeks to improve power supply to the surrounding communities; and
  • Kasoa Bulk Supply Point Project which comprises a re-construction of a section of GRIDCO’s 161KV Winneba to Mallam Transmission lines and tie-in- works is 85 percent and scheduled for completion by the end of

 

  1. Speaker, to improve the National Interconnection Transmission System (NITS), plans are underway to secure funding: for the construction of the 50MVAr STACOM in the Ashanti and the Northern Regions of Ghana (a Siemens-Ghana collaboration); complete and commission the Volta-Mallam-Achimota Transmission Line Upgrade Project by the end of first quarter 2022; commence the construction of the GRIDCo Western Corridor Transmission Upgrade Project (WCTUP); and commence the construction of the main dam under the Pwalugu Multipurpose Dam and Irrigation Project.

 

  1. In pursuit of H.E. The President’s aspiration to achieve universal coverage of electricity by 2024, a total of 162 communities were connected to the national grid thereby increasing the national electricity access rate from 85.17 percent in 2020 to 86.63 percent in 2021. Connections to another 512 communities are at various stages of

 

  1. Speaker, in 2022, the Ministry will work to complete many such projects, and approximately 800 towns will be connected to the national grid under the SHEP- 4, SHEP-5 and Turnkey Projects. Additionally, the Ministry will implement a strategy to select 2,401 communities with population of 400 and above to be connected to the national grid as a priority.

 

Energy Efficiency and Demand-Side Management
  1. Speaker, the Ministry of Energy has received over 11 million LED bulbs (6W, 9W and 13W) for distribution as part of the Energy Efficiency and Demand Side Management Policy. A list of beneficiary public institutions and MMDAs is being finalised for the distribution of five million LED bulbs to begin by end of 2021. The remaining six million LED bulbs will be sold to the general public.

 

  1. Installation works commenced for the construction of street lighting infrastructure in Ho and the newly created regional capitals. Progress of works at Ho is 80 percent complete. Poles have been procured to commence the installation of streetlights in seven Municipalities and Districts in the Ashanti, Northern, Upper East, and Upper West Regions.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will embark on streetlight metering as a measure to efficiently determine the accuracy of electricity consumption. This is to eliminate the use of estimates by Electricity Distribution Companies which is based on the total number of streetlights installed in the country, irrespective of whether they are functioning or

 

  1. Speaker, Government is still committed to Private Sector Participation (PSP) in the electricity distribution sector and is considering the implementation of a phased introduction of PSP, through privatisation of the retail component of the electricity distribution business. This is expected to increase revenue collection, improve service delivery and significantly reduce commercial distribution system losses.

 

  1. The Energy Commission trained 154 Certified Electrical Wiring Inspectors (CEWIs) to carry out inspection of wiring in commercial A total of 1,962 out of 2,640 applicants who participated in the Electrical Wiring Examinations were successful and graduated.

 

Renewable and Alternative Energy Development Programme
  1. Speaker, as part of the strategy to electrify island communities and hard-to- reach areas with renewable energy technologies, the construction of three mini- grids at Azizkpe, Aflive and Alorkpem Islands in the Ada East District of the Greater Accra Region commenced and are expected to be completed in 2022. In addition, the Ministry will construct 10 mini-grids in 10 island communities as well as supply and install solar home systems in 20 island and lakeside communities in 2022.

 

  1. Speaker, the Bui Power Authority (BPA) 50MW Solar Power Plant and the VRA 13MW Kaleo Solar Project were successfully commissioned and operationalised. In 2022, BPA will pursue the building of other hydro power plants.

 

  1. Speaker, a total of 2,068 units of solar lanterns were distributed to rural and peri-urban communities at subsidised prices as part of efforts to promote clean lighting sources. Additional 10,000 units of solar lanterns are projected to be distributed in 2022.

 

  1. In a bid to address the exposure of women and children to carbon monoxide emissions from the use of wood fuel for cooking as well as reduce deforestation, a total of 151,000 units out of a target of 446,000 Improved Charcoal Cook Stoves were distributed in 2021. The distribution of the remaining 295,000 stoves will be completed in 2022.

 

  1. The process to identify a nuclear vendor as a strategic partner for the first nuclear power plant Nine prospective vendors responded to the Request for

 

Information (RFI) by Nuclear Power Ghana Limited in collaboration with the Ministry. Assessment and data collection of the four candidate sites are ongoing and the process for prospective nuclear power site identification is 25 percent complete.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry and Nuclear Power Ghana Limited will finalise processes to identify a vendor country. Efforts toward the identification of the preferred site for the first nuclear power plant will be continued.

 

Petroleum Sector Development and Management Programme
  1. Speaker, Government assisted GNPC to acquire 7 percent each of Anadarko’s interests in the Deepwater Tano (DWT) and West Cape Three Points (WCTP) Blocks in the sale and purchase deal with Kosmos Energy.

 

  1. Total crude oil production from the Jubilee, Tweneboa-Enyenra-Ntomme (TEN) and Sankofa-Gye-Nyame (SGN) Fields was 41,532,507 barrels from January to September 2021, translating into an average daily oil production of 152,133.73 A total of 77,196.45 MMscf of gas translating into average daily gas production of 282.77 MMscf was delivered for power generation and non-power gas users over the same period.

 

  1. As at 30th September, 2021, the Greater Jubilee Field, had produced total crude oil of 19,940,478 barrels, averaging 73,042 barrels per day. A total of 26.55 Bcf of gas was delivered to the Gas Processing Plant at Atuabo, translating into an average of 25 MMscf per day.

 

  1. Total Crude oil produced by the TEN Field from January to September 2021 was 9,476,489 barrels, averaging 34,712.41 barrels per day. A total of 2.50 Bcf of gas was delivered to the Gas Processing Plant, translating into an average of 17 MMscf per day.

 

  1. Speaker, oil production from the SGN Field from January to September 2021, was 12,379,540 barrels at an average rate of 44,379.27 barrels per day. A total of 48.14 Bcf of Non-Associated Gas was delivered to the Onshore Receiving Facility (ORF) at Sanzule, translating into average of 176.35 MMscf per day.

 

  1. Processing and interpretation of the 99km 2D seismic data acquired by GNPC is completed. About 750km of 3D seismic data is expected to be acquired in the fourth quarter of 2021. In addition, preparatory studies commenced towards the drilling of a well in the Voltaian Basin in 2022.

 

  1. Aker Energy made significant progress in the concept selection for the development of the Pecan Field, and is expected to submit the Plan of Development (PoD) by end of Parliament granted approval to GNPC to

 

acquire 37 percent stake in the Deepwater Tano Cape Three Points (DWTCTP) block and 70 percent of the South Deepwater Tano (SDWT) block from Aker Energy and AGM Petroleum Limited, respectively.

 

  1. Speaker, negotiations commenced with N-Gas, the supplier of gas in the West African Gas Pipeline (WAGP) as part of Government’s efforts to renegotiate existing gas agreements to lessen the Take-or-Pay burden. The Government Negotiation Team (GNT) is also currently negotiating petroleum agreements with four companies.

 

  1. The Tema LNG Project, a strategic project to diversify and boost security of gas supply to the nation, is expected to be commissioned by end of 2021. The terminal will have the capacity to receive, regasify, and deliver up to 400

 

  1. Speaker, all LPG intervention activities were reviewed and embedded in the LPG for Development (LPG4D) Programme. Several activities will be incorporated under the two main modules – LPG for Household Module (LPG4H) and the Commercial Module – to increase the use of LPG to 50 percent by 2030.

 

  1. With regard to the LPG for Household Module, 120,000 LPG cook stoves will be distributed across 60 districts in the rural and peri-urban areas. The Commercial Module will introduce interventions that will benefit senior high, technical and vocational schools, commercial catering users and some commercial

 

  1. The Cylinder Recirculation Model (CRM) will continue to run alongside the current distribution system. The Cylinder Investment Margin (CIM) will be introduced to fund the supply of cylinders which shall be distributed for

 

  1. Speaker, the Petroleum Hub Corporation was set up, an Interim report on the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) of the Petroleum Hub Infrastructure Master Plan was completed and a temporary environmental permit obtained. The draft Spatial Plan was subjected to review at a stakeholders’ forum. The Ministry of Energy at the recent Offshore Technology Conference (OTC) also engaged prospective investors to promote Ghana as an attractive destination for investment, technology, and a hub for refined petroleum products in the West African sub-region. In 2022, the Corporation will commence feasibility studies on the Petroleum Hub Infrastructure Master Plan.

 

Infrastructure Sector

 

  1. The main focus of the Infrastructure Sector is: water resource management; management of protected areas, coastal and marine erosion; provision of transport infrastructure; information and communication; construction industry

 

development; drainage and flood control; infrastructure maintenance; rural and urban development management; and disaster management.

 

  1. These interventions in the Infrastructure Sector will contribute to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8,

9, 11, 12, 13 14, 15, 16, and 17; and the AU Agenda 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 10, 11, 12, 17

and 20. These are to promote the development of quality, reliable, sustainable and resilient infrastructure for broad-based economic development and improvement in livelihoods and wellbeing of citizens.

 

MINISTRY OF SANITATION AND WATER RESOURCES

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Water Resources Management Programme
  1. Speaker, following interventions by Government through the programme dubbed “Galamstop”, the turbidity values for most of the major river bodies in the country have improved. Available data indicates that, the Pra River at Twifo Praso with a turbidity value of 1,157 as at February 2021, improved to 990 at the end of September 2021. Within the same period: the Pra River at Daboase improved from 7,500 to 1,052; the Ankobra River at Bonsaso, from 560 to 345; the Tano River at Elubo, from 850 to 732; the Birim River at Osino, from 14,800 to 870; and Birim River at Bunso from 4,700 to 604.

 

  1. Speaker, the Water Resources Commission will continue to monitor the quality levels of our water-bodies to assess the improvement of the turbidity levels.

 

  1. Speaker, buffer zone restoration schemes were initiated in selected riparian communities within the Black and White Volta, Tano, Offin and Densu basins with a variety of activities, including training of 252 nursery attendants in seven communities, and planting of 16,937 tree seedlings. The import of the programme is to restore degraded buffers around the river bodies and reduce the negative impact of human activities on the water bodies.

 

Urban Water Management Programme
  1. Speaker, as part of Government’s “Water for All” programme, several water systems have been initiated and are at various stages of completion. They include the:
    • Upper East Region Water Supply Project Phase I (covering Navrongo, Bolgatanga, Paga, Bongo and its environs) – 98 percent completed and scheduled for commissioning in December 2021;
    • Yendi Water Supply Project – tender document for the selection of a contractor to be ready by end December 2021;

 

  • Tamale Water   Supply   Project   –   VFM   completed   to   pave   way             for commencement of the Project;
  • Damango Water Supply Project – Initial designs and VFM completed;
  • Wenchi Water Supply Project – VFM completed and project commenced;
  • Keta Water Supply Project – VFM completed and works on the superstructure is ongoing;
  • Sekondi-Takoradi Water Supply Project – VFM completed and contract signed; and
  • Techiman Water Supply Project – Evaluation of proposals

 

  1. Speaker, Government has secured an additional funding of US$51.5 million for the extension of water supply to low income consumers within the Greater Kumasi Metropolitan Area (GKMA), and continued the Batch 3 works of the Greater Accra Metropolitan Area (GAMA) project. Procurement of a consultant for GKMA Water Supply Master Plan has commenced.

 

Rural Water Management Programme
  1. Speaker, the Rural Communities and Small Towns Water Supply Project covers five regions, namely; Ashanti, Eastern, Greater Accra, Oti and Volta. It involves the construction of 150-point sources and 12 small town water systems to serve 588 communities at the cost of €30 million. A VFM analysis has been undertaken.

 

  1. Government is constructing 654 boreholes out of which 622 will be fitted with hand pumps, and 32 with limited mechanised systems in selected regions across the country. A total of 533 boreholes have been completed and installed with hand pumps. Four boreholes with limited mechanised systems have also been

 

  1. Speaker, the Debt Swap for Development Programme (DSDP) is to expand access to and ensure sustainable water supply and sanitation services in 36 rural and small towns or communities in the Agortime/Ziope, Ho West and South Dayi Districts at a cost of US$3.78 million. A total population of 69,000 is expected to benefit from the project. So far, four out of six limited mechanised systems and five out of 12 Small Town Pipe Systems were completed and commissioned in the Ho West District.

 

  1. The scope of the Five Districts Water Supply Project Phase III includes the completion of the distribution networks in areas already connected to transmission mains of the water treatment plants constructed under Phases I and
  2. The project will cover 183 communities and is expected to benefit about 222,075 people in the Adaklu, Agortime/Ziope, Central Tongu, Ho West and North Tongu Districts. A VFM analysis was undertaken.

 

Sanitation Sector Management Programme
  1. Speaker, funding amounting to US$74 million has been secured to undertake the construction of 120 disability-friendly, fit-for-purpose, gender-sensitive institutional sanitation facilities for beneficiary schools in the GKMA. The project will also provide 30,000 household toilets in GKMA, and expand and rehabilitate the Asafo Sewerage System in Kumasi. Additionally, it will provide 30 beneficiary schools with institutional sanitation facilities and 12,000 household toilets in the GAMA. Contractors were selected to commence the construction of the household toilets in eight municipalities in the GKMA.

 

  1. Under the Greater Accra Resilient and Integrated Development (GARID) Project, the Ministry is constructing an engineered sanitary landfill and a material recovery facility in the Ga West Municipality. In addition, a waste transfer station will be constructed at the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission and a dumpsite at Abokobi (Abloradjei) will be capped. A fence will be constructed along the Odaw drain to prevent the dumping of solid waste into the Land has been secured for the construction of the land fill and the waste transfer station.

 

  1. Speaker, works continued with the decommissioning and re-engineering of the landfill sites at Kpone (Greater Accra Region) and Oti (Ashanti Region) to transform and improve the management of municipal waste and the environmental conditions of the communities within the catchment areas. Currently, work done are 97 percent and 70 percent at Kpone and Oti sites, respectively.

 

  1. Speaker, with respect to the Water Sector Management, Government will continue to execute the following projects to improve the quality of and access to water supply:
    • Upper East Region Water Supply Project, Phase II;
    • Keta Water Supply Project;
    • Tamale Water Supply Project;
    • Damongo Water Supply Project;
    • Wenchi Water Supply Project;
    • Yendi Water Supply Project;
    • Techiman Water Supply Expansion Project;
    • Sekondi-Takoradi Water Supply Project;
    • Sunyani Water Supply Project;
    • GAMA & GKMA Sanitation and Water Supply Project;
    • Services for Enhancement of Nationwide Water Network Management Project;
    • Sogakope-Lome Transboundary Water Supply Project;
    • Rural Communities and Small Towns Water Supply Project (RCSTWSP) Aqua Africa;
    • Five Districts Water Supply Scheme (STRABAG Phase III); and

 

  • Debt Swap   Development   Programme   (DSDP)   –   Water          Supply Improvement Project (WASIP).

 

  1. With respect to Sanitation Sector Management, Government will continue to execute the following projects to improve on the sanitation conditions in the country:
    • Greater Accra Metropolitan Area (GAMA) Sanitation and Water Project- Sanitation Component;
    • Greater Accra Sustainable Sanitation and Livelihoods Improvement Project (GASSLIP);
    • Greater Accra Resilient and Integrated Development (GARID) Project; and
    • Construction of faecal sludge management infrastructure in selected urban

 

MINISTRY OF WORKS AND HOUSING

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Infrastructure Sector Management Programme
  1. Speaker, to protect the coastal settlements against erosion and flooding, the Ministry of Works and Housing continued the implementation of the following projects which are at various stages of completion; Axim (100 percent), Amanful Kumah (100 percent), Dansoman (95 percent), Elmina Phase III (80 percent) and Anomabu (65 percent) coastal protection projects. Other projects include Komenda (85 percent), Cape Coast (72 percent), Dixcove (35 percent), Aboadze Phase II (32 percent) and Ningo-Prampram (30 percent).

 

  1. Under the 2020 Flood Control Programme, 161 out of 312 desilting contracts were completed, while the remaining 151 desilting works are at various stages of The construction of 19km of various drains have been completed while more than 1,000km of drains have been excavated, rechanneled and maintained across the country towards reducing the perennial devastating floods. In 2022, the Ministry will continue with the implementation of outstanding works under the 2020 National Flood Control Programme and commence the implementation of the 2022 edition of the Programme.

 

  1. Other priority projects to be implemented include: the drainage at Baale, Lafa, Zongo/Dzor and Tamale; Kumasi West Drainage; Kumasi East Drainage; as well as the Kumasi Central Business District

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will commence the performance-based dredging of the Odaw channel as well as other related civil works towards improving the drainage and flood management systems within the Odaw drainage

 

Human Settlement and Development Programme

 

  1. Speaker, the policy objective of the housing sub-sector is to provide adequate, safe, secure, quality and affordable housing schemes for the people of Ghana. An estimated 60 percent of Ghana’s urban population will require various Government interventions to access decent housing.

 

  1. In this regard, the Ministry will initiate a programme to subsidise the cost of construction of housing units. On the supply side, Government will provide: land to developers; infrastructure at designated affordable housing project sites; and tax incentives and exemptions. On the demand side, Government is facilitating the establishment of a credible mortgage system, while encouraging Rent-to- Own Schemes in the

 

  1. The Ministry has started the process to develop housing schemes in two designated sites on 203 acres of land at Pokuase and Amasaman in the Greater Accra Region, and 200 acres of land at Dedesua in the Ashanti Region which will provide 12,000 housing

 

  1. Speaker, the Ministry, in collaboration with State Housing Company Limited (SHCL), commenced works on the preparation of the District Housing Programme for the construction of 6,584 rental housing units at the District Level for public servants over the medium-term. Currently, a total funding of €160 million has been secured for the project and construction is expected to commence in 2022.

 

  1. Similarly, TDC Development Company Limited (TDCL) commenced works on the construction of 139 blocks made up of 3,016 housing units under the Kpone Affordable Housing Programme which is progressing In 2022, the project will be continued to deliver affordable housing units for the low to middle income earners in the country.

 

  1. The Ministry, in collaboration with the Ministry of Finance, is considering available options for the completion of the Saglemi Affordable Housing Project. The Ministry envisages that work will resume on the 1,502 housing units under Phase I of the

 

  1. Speaker, works continued on Phase III of the Security Services Housing Programme which comprises the construction of 320 units for the Ghana Police Service at the Ghana National Police Training School, Tesano. The overall progress of work stands at 53 percent and is expected to be completed in 2022.

 

  1. Under the Redevelopment Programme, the Ministry continued the construction of 121 housing units for public servants comprising 2- and 3-bedroom apartments, as well as town houses, at Airport, Ridge, Cantonments and Labone in Accra. The project is about 65 percent complete and is expected to be completed in 2022.

 

 

  1. State Housing Company (SHC) Limited has also embarked on a number of housing projects across the country as part of Government’s strategic efforts to address the nation’s housing deficit. Accordingly, the construction of 16 units of apartments under the Club House Redevelopment Project at North Kaneshie is fully completed, while the SHC Gardens Project involving the construction of 68 housing units and shops is 90 percent

 

  1. The Koforidua Affordable Housing Project which entails the construction of 342 housing units is 25 percent completed while the Legacy Court Project which comprises the construction of 12 houses, 7 town homes and 40 apartments is 60 percent completed. The SHC Limited also commenced the construction of 120 housing units each at Sefwi-Wiawso and Pwalugu and the projects are 30 percent and 55 percent completed, respectively. Additionally, the construction of 225 Housing Units at Oyoko Akrofrom under the John Agyekum Kuffour Estates is 70 percent completed. Other housing projects which have commenced in the Bono, Central, Western and Upper West Regions are also progressing

 

MINISTRY OF ROADS AND HIGHWAYS

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022

Road Rehabilitation and Maintenance Programme

  1. Speaker, the Ministry of Roads and Highways through its oversight responsibility, maintained its focus on routine and periodic maintenance activities to protect the huge investment made by Government in the provision of road infrastructure. As at the end of September 2021, routine maintenance was carried out on 21,165km of the trunk road network, 6,265km of the feeder road network, and 2,937km of the urban road network.

 

  1. Within the same period, maintenance activities comprising re-gravelling, spot improvement and resealing works were carried out on 162km, 412km and 262km of the trunk road, feeder road and urban road networks Additionally, rehabilitation works covering minor upgrading and construction of culverts and drainage structures were carried out on 223km of trunk roads, 173km of the feeder road and 102km of the urban road networks.

 

  1. The Department of Urban Roads is undertaking an asphaltic overlay programme in various towns and communities across the Since 2017, about 1,445km of asphalt overlay works have been completed, with 243km done in 2021. Table
  • below shows the towns and communities covered in 2021 under the

 

Table 24: List of Towns and Communities Covered under the Asphaltic Overlay Programme in 2021

REGION

AREA

 

Greater Accra

Osu, Labone, Airport Residential Area, Tesano, Madina, Tema, Ayawaso, Gbawe, Ngleshie Amanfrom, Shiashie, Burma Camp and Adenta.

Eastern

Anyinam-Kwabeng, Kyebi-Bunso, Suhum, Akim Oda, Kwabeng, Akropong, Akim Oda and Akwatia

North East

Nalerigu, Walewale and Gambaga

Northern

Choggu, Nyohini and Educational Ridge

Western

Adientem-Mpatado, Apollo- Apremdo, Davies Street (Anaji)

 

Ashanti

KNUST, Juaben, Asokore, Suame Maakro, Effiduase and Effiduase Asokore, Suame Roundabout- Airport Roundabout

Central

Winneba, Kasoa and Swedru

Upper East

DVLA Road

Source: MoRH

Road and Bridge Construction Programme

  1. Speaker, the Ministry undertook various development activities including construction, rehabilitation, reconstruction, and upgrading of roads as well as construction of bridges and interchanges.

 

  1. About 50km of trunk roads and 25km of urban roads are programmed to be Additionally, 8No. bridges on the trunk road, 5No. on the feeder road and 5No. on the urban road networks have been planned for completion. The Ministry will also undertake 13 No. engineering studies – 5 on trunk roads, 3 on feeder roads and 5 on urban roads.

 

  1. In 2022, the Sector plans to complete 25,000km, 16,000km and 3,500km of routine maintenance activities (grading, pothole patching, shoulder maintenance, vegetation control) on the trunk, feeder and urban road networks, respectively. Additionally, periodic maintenance activities (spot improvement, re-gravelling, resealing, asphaltic overlay, partial reconstruction and maintenance of bridges and culverts) will be undertaken on 23km, 800km, and 300km of trunk, feeder and urban roads, The Ministry will also undertake minor rehabilitation works on 75km of trunk roads, 150km of feeder roads and 30km of urban roads.

 

  1. Speaker, development works progressed steadily on several major projects. The Pokuase Interchange under the Accra Urban Transport Project which involves

 

the construction of a 4-tier interchange, construction of 12km of selected roads, segregated walkways, footbridges, underpasses and drainage structures was completed and commissioned on 9th July, 2021.

 

  1. Works on Phase 2 of the Obetsebi Lamptey Circle Interchange is at a physical progress of 16 percent. Additionally, with Phase 1 of the Tema Motorway Roundabout completed, Phase 2, which involves the construction of the 3rd tier of the interchange, will take off in

 

  1. Speaker, works on the La Beach Road Project (Lots 1&2) which involved improving capacity along the Accra-Tema Beach Road and the construction of a 3-tier interchange at the Nungua Barrier are at 13 percent and 21 percent, respectively. Construction works on the Flower Pot Interchange on the Spintex road is 13 percent completed. In addition, development works on the Kumasi Lake Roads and Drainage Extension Project stood at 78 percent as at the end of September 2021.

 

  1. Work on the construction of prefabricated bridges to improve connectivity within areas cut-off by waterways continued in 2021. All the components of the bridges have arrived and 45 contractors started work on the substructures with 3No. bridges fully completed.

 

  1. The following road works will also be continued in 2022:

 

Table 25: Ongoing Road Projects

REGION

CONTRACT DESCRIPTION

LENGTH

(km)

PHYSICAL PROGRESS %

Ahafo

Upgrading of Akrodie-Sayereso Road (Km 0+000-20+000)

20.0

61

Ahafo

Upgrading of Nobekaw-Sankore Road(Km 0+000-11+500)

11.5

43

Ahafo

Upgrading of Atronie-Mim Road

17.0

58

Ashanti

Upgrading of Nsuta-Beposo, Lot 3

7.0

94

Ashanti

Upgrading of Mampong-Kofiase Road (Km 0.0-14.0), Lot 2

14.0

77

Ashanti

Reconstruction of Anwiankwanta- Obuasi Road (30Km)

30.0

77

Ashanti

Rehabilitation   of   Obuasi  Town                     Roads (20.00Km)

20.0

63

Bono

Upgrading of Menji-Bui Road (Km 0+000 – 30+000)

30.0

41

Bono

Upgrading of Sampa-Jinijini Road (Km 0+000-31+500)

31.5

35

 

 

REGION

CONTRACT DESCRIPTION

LENGTH

(km)

PHYSICAL PROGRESS %

Bono East

Output and Performance-Based Road Contract on selected Feeder Roads in the Atebubu-Amantin Municipality

214

Contract awarded.

Designs ongoing

Bono East

Upgrading   of   Atebubu-Kwame                Danso- Kwadwokrom

35.0

12

Bono East

Upgrading of Asekye-Atebubu Road

30.0

13

Central

Partial Reconstruction of Bawjiase-Adeiso (15Km)

15.0

75

Central

Upgrading of Afrengua-Asafena Road

9.0

50

Eastern

Upgrading of Osiem-Begoro

24.8

100

Eastern

Upgrading of Kwabeng-Akropong Road & Akropong Town Roads

20.5

80

Eastern

Rehabilitation of Asamankese-Akroso Road (15.3Km) and Akroso Town Roads (5.3Km)

20.6

52

Greater Accra

Rehabilitation of selected roads in Okaikoi North

11.0

75

North East

Upgrading of Yagaba-Mankarigu Road (Km 12.0-24.0) and Mankarigu-Nawuni Road (Km 0.0-17.5)

29.5

70

North East

Upgrading of Wulugu-Wiase Road (Km 0.0- 35.0)

35.0

46

Northern

Upgrading of Salaga-Bimbilla Road

71.0

52

Northern

Upgrading   of   Salaga-Ekumdipe-Kpandai Road

29.4

23

Northern

Output and Performance-Based Road Contract on Tatale-Zabzugu-Yendi-Tamale

165.8

Contract awarded. Designs

ongoing

Oti

Rehabilitation   of   Nkonya                     Wrumpong- Kwamikrom

21.0

55

Oti

Rehabilitation of Jasikan-Worawora

17.6

45

Oti

Reconstruction of Nkwanta-Dambai Road

50.0

50

Savanah

Upgrading of Daboya-Mankarigu Road (Km 10-30)

20.0

36

Savanah

Upgrading   of   Salaga-Ekumdipe-Kpandai Road (Km 3+700-26+700)

23.0

34

Savanah

Construction of Binjai-Fufulso Road (Km 0+000-35+000)     And     Km     64+100-

100+000)-71Km

71.0

30

Upper East

Upgrading of Chuchuliga-Sandema- Wiase Road

40.0

45

Upper East

Upgrading of Navrongo-Naga

39.5

20

 

 

REGION

CONTRACT DESCRIPTION

LENGTH

(km)

PHYSICAL PROGRESS %

Upper West

Upgrading of Wa-Bulenga-Yaala Road (Km 6-37)

31.0

46

Upper West

Upgrading of Wechau-Ga Road (Km 2.3- 22.5)

20.2

32

Upper West

Output and Performance-Based Road Contract on selected Feeder Roads and Farm Tracks in the Upper West Region

670

3no Contracts awarded

Designs ongoing

Volta

Rehabilitation of Asikuma Jn.-Have Road

39.3

New Contractor on site

Volta

Upgrading of Golokwati -Wli Road

17.0

96

Volta

Dualization of Ho Main Road

10.5

53

Western

Upgrading of Opon Valley Junction – Opon Valley-Agyempoma Road

20.0

71

Western

Upgrading of Sureso-Aboi Junction Road

15.6

67

Western

Rehabilitation of Essiama- Telekubokazo- Aniben Junction Road

30.2

60

Western North

Upgrading of Sefwi Wiawso- Akontombra Road (Km 0.0-15) -Lot 2

15.0

51

Western North

Upgrading of Adwofua-Oseikojokrom Road

25.0

23

Source: MoRH

 

  1. Speaker, works under the Master Project Support Agreement (MPSA) with Sinohydro Corporation Limited continued with progress on the following projects as shown in Table 26 below:

 

Table 26: Projects under the MPSA

Lot

Description

Unit

Scope

Status of Completion

1

Accra Inner City Roads

km

84

Commencement delayed

2

Kumasi Inner City Roads

km

100

Commencement delayed

3

Tamale Interchange Project

No.

1

84%

4

PTC      Roundabout      Interchange Project, Takoradi

No.

1

20%

5

Adenta-Dodowa Dual Carriageway

km

14

Commencement delayed

6

Sunyani Inner City Roads

km

39

16%

 

 

Lot

Description

Unit

Scope

Status of Completion

7

Western Region and Cape Coast Inner City Roads

km

32.19

65%

8

Upgrading of Selected Feeder Roads in Ashanti and Western Regions

km

68

75%

9

Rehabilitation    of    New    Abirem- Ofoasekuma Road

km

38

Commencement delayed

10

Construction of Hohoe-Jasikan-Dodi- Pepesu

km

66.4

75%

Source: MoRH

 

Public Private Partnerships (PPP)

  1. Speaker, the Ministry’s Public Private Partnerships (PPP) programme for the financing, construction and management of road infrastructure has three projects at different stages of preparation:
    • Accra-Tema Motorway PPP Project (31.7km) – The financing arrangement is completed and construction will commence in 2022;
    • Accra-Cape Coast-Takoradi PPP Project (208km) – The feasibility study is being finalised. The final feasibility study report will provide key inputs into the Abidjan-Lagos Corridor Project;
    • Development of Tema Arterial Roads – The Project involves an upgrade of the Tema hospital Road into a 3-lane dual carriage with service lanes and five MRH and MoT are currently involved in internal consultations with key stakeholders to explore other available financing options to ensure the start of the works in 2022.

 

  1. Speaker, for road safety and environmental activities, the Ministry, in 2022, will install 20No. traffic signals and maintain 310No. of installed signals. 50No. road safety hazard sites are also expected to be treated. 20No. locations are to have junction improvement and 5km of walkways are to be constructed. Overloading is also expected to be kept below 2 percent.

 

  1. Major pipeline projects that are expected to take off in 2022 include:
    • Roads
      • Accra-Kumasi Dualisation (in sections)
      • Kumasi South and Western Bypass
      • Kumasi Outer Ring Road
      • Mamfe-Koforidua
      • Oyibi-Dodowa-Somanya-Akuse Road
      • Accra Outer Ring Road
      • Asutuare Junction-Volivo Bridge
      • Eastern Corridor Road (Gbintiri-Kulungugu)

 

  • Sawla-Wa
  • Bridges
    • Buipe, Yapei and Daboya Bridges
    • Adawso-Ekyi Amanfrom Bridge
    • Obuasi, Juanayilli and Nawunui Bridges
  • Construction of Interchanges in the Greater Kumasi Metropolitan Area (including Suame, Santasi and Airport Roundabout)

 

MINISTRY OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITALISATION

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Management and Administration Programme
  1. Speaker, in accordance with the Cyber Security Act 2020, (Act 1038), the Cyber Security Authority (CSA) was officially inaugurated on 1st October, 2021. With the passage of the Act, CSA will execute the various functions enshrined in the Act. The Ministry of Communications and Digitalisation (MoCD) will develop a Critical Information Infrastructure (CII) Database, Government Digitalisation Initiative (GDI) database, and as well develop and implement a Cyber Risk Management Framework.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ghana Open Data Initiative (GODI) is a platform that makes Government data available to the public for research and analysis, among The Open Data Policy and Action Plan was developed to guide its operationalisation. An open portal, (data.gov.gh) was developed and focal persons in MDAs and MMDAs trained to upload data unto the portal.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will deploy an information system for Computer Emergency Response Teams (CERT) to support incident response operations, and develop CERT products such as security advisories and alerts to businesses and the

 

ICT Infrastructure Development Programme
  1. Speaker, as part of Government efforts at digitising information, the Ministry is implementing a Case Management System at the Office of the Attorney General which will be interconnected to the systems at the Police and Judicial Services. This will enable the Office of the Attorney General and the Ghana Police Service expedite action on the building of dockets and the prosecution of cases at the Law Courts.

 

  1. The National SIM Card Registration programme commenced on 1st October, 2021 for all SIM card activation on all networks. The exercise will span a period of six The National Identification Card is the sole identity card for the exercise. However, for diplomats and Ghanaians currently outside Ghana, passports will be accepted in lieu of the Ghana Card. The completion of the exercise is expected to reduce SIM fraud and use of mobile phones for illegal activities.

 

 

  1. Digitisation of paper records at the Ghana Immigration Service (GIS) was successfully completed with 6.195 million records digitised and entered onto the Enterprise Content Management

 

  1. Speaker, the Ghana.Gov centralised public sector digital revenue management and payment platform, developed by a local consortium of fintech companies in collaboration with the Ministry of Finance and MoCD, was launched on 14thJuly, 2021. As at end September 2021, a total of 38 Government Agencies (consisting of 10 MDAs and 28 MMDAs) were enrolled unto the Ghana.Gov platform. Revenues accrued on the platform as at 30th September, 2021 amounted to about GH¢31.41 billion.

 

  1. Speaker, the Ministry launched the Rural Telephony and Digital Inclusion Project in November 2020 to provide telecommunication infrastructure to towns and communities where Mobile Network Operators (MNOs) do not operate. In 2021, a total of 506 towers were erected out of the acquired 1,054 sites. Two network operation centres are live in Accra and Kumasi while 800 communities were provided with broadband infrastructure. A total number of 2,016 sites will be built upon completion of this project.

 

  1. Speaker, in 2022, the Ministry, through GIFEC, will provide 1,400 additional sites under the Ghana Rural Telephony and Digital Inclusion Project for voice and data services to ensure reliable, affordable, and secured broadband infrastructure to 12,000 rural communities. The Ministry will also extend aerial fibre coverage by 1,000km as backhaul to rural communities to improve quality of service and customer experience.

 

  1. Speaker, the National Communications Authority (NCA) granted approval and authorisation for 53 new FM stations, and renewed the licenses of 64 existing FM stations.

 

  1. The National Information Technology Agency (NITA) is collaborating with key stakeholders to pilot the Integrated Traffic Management System to reduce traffic infractions and automate the related

 

  1. The Ministry, through NITA, in 2022 will;
    • Provide appropriate and affordable devices for digitalisation of 7,000 institutions in rural communities;
    • Provide connectivity to 261 District Assemblies, 16 Regional Coordinating Councils, 100 District and Regional Hospitals, 500 other Government locations (Police Stations, Post Offices, other GIFMIS offices); and

 

  • Upgrade the National Data Centre with additional storage capacity and Government Cloud infrastructure as the primary data storage or data recovery site for all MMDAs.

 

  1. NITA, in collaboration with the Ministry of Education, will deploy Learning Management System (LMS) to 25 Public Tertiary Institutions in 2022 to improve on the enrolment of free SHS graduates. The LMS will also facilitate distance education, support the Open University, and provide a platform for sharing common content seamlessly. This will target the less endowed Public Tertiary Institutions during the first phase of

 

  1. The Ministry will deploy independent stand-alone solar power supply systems at all the 42 Digital Terrestrial Transmission (DTT) sites to ensure clean, stable and reliable power to protect the transmission equipment, the investment of government and the

 

ICT Capacity Development Programme
  1. Speaker, in 2021, the Ministry launched the Girls-in-ICT Initiative and trained 200 ICT teachers as trainers, and 2,000 girls in the North East, Western and Western North Regions received training in basic computer literacy, coding, programming and HTML. The Ministry also trained 50 women from selected tertiary institutions across the country in various programmes, including Artificial Intelligence, Deep Learning, Machine Learning, Cloud, Cyber Security, Fundamentals of Scratch (i.e., Game and Dialogue) curriculum preparation and interview skills. In addition, about 20,000 girls from the girls’ senior high schools in the Ashanti Region were trained in Cyber Hygiene and the contents and implications of the Cyber Security Act 2020, Act 1038.

 

  1. Speaker, the Ministry will in 2022, facilitate the training of 3,000 girls from three selected regions under the Girls-in-ICT Programme while providing them with mentorship from interactions with selected women in technology related fields.

 

  1. The Educational version of the indigenous Nyansapo Computer Operating System, developed by the Advance Information Technology Institute-Kofi Annan Centre of Excellence (AITI-KACE) in 2021. Nyansapo was endorsed by the UN Secretary-General’s Roadmap for Digital Cooperation to offer critical support to countries in the West Africa sub-Region to meet SDG 4: Quality Education by Discussions are ongoing with the Ministry of Education for its adoption and use.

 

  1. Speaker, the AITI-KACE will in 2022 continue its research work on Solar- powered Irrigation System to contribute towards achieving all-year-round activities in agriculture.

 

 

  1. The AITI-KACE will conclude research work on TV Whitespace technology aimed at improving last mile internet connectivity in rural areas and pilot implementation of same in rural communities in Sunyani and Additionally, AITI-KACE will operationalise the Software Quality Assurance Laboratory in collaboration with the Ghana Standards Authority (GSA) and NITA to provide service to the software industry in Ghana.

 

  1. Speaker, complementing Government’s agenda to create more jobs for the people, the Accra Digital Centre (ADC) created jobs for 5,000 youth and vulnerable persons from low-income communities. In 2022, the Ministry will boost digital skills for 60,000 beneficiaries through a train-the-trainer model and provide digital skills for 8,000 youth through the Ghana Tech Lab, Innovation Hub and Kumasi Business Incubator.

 

Postal and Courier Services Regulation Commission Programme
  1. Speaker, the second phase of the National Digital Property Addressing System (NDPAS) which involves the use of offline mobile devices for Hinter-land Activations, Ghana Post Ground Activation, Emergency Services Activation, and the establishment of a National Digital Property Register among others, was completed by Ghana Post Company Limited. E-services are now available on the GhPost Pay Platform for online businesses, including sale of Tertiary Institutions Admission Forms, payment of Post Office Box bills and other transactions with Ghana Post.

 

Ghana Meteorological Services Programme
  1. Speaker, in 2022, the Ghana Meteorological Service will procure and install an Automatic Weather Observatory System (AWOS) at Kumasi. This will ensure compliance with International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) and World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) standards and protocols and enhance the air travel safety the country enjoys.

 

  1. In addition, the Service will continue with the gradual digitisation of the manual stations by installing Automatic Weather Stations and also refurbish the radar at the head office to improve lead time and accuracy of weather

 

MINISTRY OF RAILWAYS DEVELOPMENT

 

2021 performance and Outlook for 2022
  1. Speaker, the development of the Railway Flagship Programme is on course towards a modern, robust and integrated railway system in Ghana. Key among the progress made in 2021 include development of sections of the Western Rail Line and the Tema-Mpakadan rail line on standard gauge.

 

  1. The Tema-Mpakadan Single Standard Gauge Railway Line Project, which is currently about 90 percent complete and covers approximately 100km of the proposed Ghana-Burkina Faso Railway Interconnectivity Project, is expected to be completed by the second quarter of 2022. The remaining sections spanning about 1,100km from Mpakadan through Paga to Ouagadougou will be undertaken under a PPP arrangement.

 

  1. The construction of the 22km Kojokrom-Manso section of the Western Rail Line is currently about 65 percent complete and is expected to be completed by mid- The development of the new standard gauge Western Rail Line will continue from Manso to Huni Valley. Additionally, a new standard gauge rail line to the Takoradi Port will be constructed in order to have a continuous standard gauge connection from the Port to the Nsuta and other mines to facilitate the efficient haulage of minerals.

 

  1. The Government of Ghana (GoG) is also funding the development of an additional 6km of standard gauge rail line from Adum to Kaase in the Ashanti Region as part of the Western Railway Line Development Project. Site clearance works are currently

 

  1. Speaker, to ensure adequate local capacity to manage and maintain the railway system, refurbishment of the Railway Central Training Institute at Sekondi, was completed in January 2021, and the Institute, in collaboration with George Grant University for Mines and Technology, has provided training for over 300 Ghanaian youth in various engineering degree programmes.

 

  1. The development of the Takoradi Port-Huni Valley Railway Project is expected to commence by the end of Additionally, preparatory works on the development of the following sections of the Western Railway on standard gauge will be completed in 2022 to enable the commencement of works:
    • Kaase-Eduadin (approximately 12km);
    • Eduadin-Obuasi (approximately 51km);
    • Obuasi-Dunkwa (approximately 38km); and
    • Huni Valley-Dunkwa (approximately 75km).

 

MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022
  1. Speaker, to promote sustainable transportation systems with a focus on technological shift from conventional fuels to more environmentally friendly alternatives, a draft E-mobility policy has been developed. The policy incorporates implementation frameworks for the deployment and scale-up of electric vehicles.

 

  1. Consultative meetings on the Review of the Road Traffic Act, 2004 (ACT 683) and the Road Traffic Regulations, 2012 L.I. 2180 were completed and will be laid before Parliament for consideration and

 

Maritime Services Programme
  1. Speaker, the Ministry of Transport continued its programme of modernisation of the country’s sea ports to position the country as the leading container hub within the West African Sub-region. At the Tema Port, the last of the four berths of the Dedicated Container Terminal (MPS Terminal 3) was completed and commissioned. The new Terminal has enhanced Ghana’s competitiveness in the subregion. Prior to the commencement of the expansion project in 2017, the cargo throughput was 13.4 million tonnes. This increased to 18.9 million tonnes in 2020 and is expected to increase further with the completion of the last berth.

 

  1. At the Takoradi Port, the development of the Container and a Multi-purpose Terminal with a 600-metre quay wall capable of accommodating bigger vessels is 90 percent complete. The Project is expected to increase port traffic, revenue generation and job

 

  1. To ensure safe launching and landing of artisanal fishing as well as create and maintain hygienic environment and job opportunities within the fishing communities, a total of 14 landing sites are at the following stages of completion as shown in Table 27 below:

 

Table 27: Status of Fish Landing Sites under Construction

Location

Status of Completion

Axim

76%

Dixcove

70%

Moree

78%

Mumford

80%

Winneba

56%

Senya Beraku

93%

Gomoa Feteh

90%

Teshie

93%

Keta

6%

Jamestown

34%

Elmina

12%

Osu

53%

Ekumfi

25%

Mfantseman

32%

Source: MoT

 

  1. Additionally, the development of complementary projects such as fish smoking pavilions, health centres, multiple purpose market facilities, sanitary facilities and drainage systems are expected to commence in

 

  1. Feasibility studies for the Volta Lake Improvement Project was completed. The main components of the project include: a Slipway; an Integrated Management System (IMS); and 10 landing stages with reception facilities at Agordeke, Akateng, Dambai, Dodoikope, Kete-Krachi, Kojokrom, Kpando Torkor, Kwame Dwamena, Makango and Yeji; as well as the supply of five modular (passenger and vehicle)

 

  1. Three trash skimmer vessels to harvest plastics and other debris in our coastal and inland waterways were procured, delivered and deployed in the Eastern and Western waters on the Volta

 

  1. Speaker, preparatory works on Phase I of the Boankra Integrated Logistics Terminal Project, which include the construction of a container depot, warehouses, a truck parking area and an administrative building were commenced. When completed, the Project will improve job creation and facilitate transit trade particularly to the landlocked countries of Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger.

 

  1. To improve maritime education and training, a feasibility study was completed for the modernisation of the Regional Maritime University. The project includes lecture theatres, simulator centres, laboratories and training The project will improve practical education, training of students, and promote the creation of jobs in the maritime industry.

 

Road Transport Management Programme
  1. Speaker, to improve service delivery at the various DVLA offices and also ensure seamless flow of information between the Ghana Police Service, National Insurance Commission and other state agencies, the digitisation of vehicle records from 1995-2018 was completed. Digitisation of records from 2019-2021 is currently ongoing.

 

  1. As part of efforts to improve road safety in the country, the National Road Safety Authority continued with the “ARRIVE ALIVE” campaign with the participation of over 20 media houses across the country. It has empowered passengers to speak-up against bad driving behaviours and dangers on our The Authority will scale-up the campaign to influence the required positive change in road user behaviour in addressing road safety issues in the country.

 

  1. A draft Legislative Instrument to operationalise the National Road Safety Act 2019, (Act 993) is being finalised and will be submitted to Parliament for

 

consideration. The Regulation is expected to be operationalised in 2022 to improve Road Safety in the country.

 

  1. As part of measures to improve mass transportation, Government signed a contract for the supply of 45 intercity buses for Metro Mass Transit Limited (MMTL). Procurement processes were also completed for the supply of 55 intercity buses to augment the existing fleet of These buses are expected to be in operation in 2022.

 

Aviation Development and Management
  1. Speaker, as part of Government pursuit to make Ghana the Aviation Hub for the West African Sub-region, the Ministry is at its final stage of negotiations with the selected strategic partner for the establishment of the home-based carrier. It is expected that the negotiation will be finalised and the airline established in 2022.

 

  1. Speaker, works are also progressing steadily on the expansion of the Kumasi and Tamale Airports to grant them international status. In 2022, both projects are expected to be completed to improve regional connectivity, trade and tourism.

 

  1. As part of Government’s policy to establish an airport/airstrip in each of the 16 regions to boost tourism and trade, an airport is being considered in either the Central Region, Western Region or straddle the two regions. Feasibility study is currently ongoing for the development of the airport and processes for the construction are expected to commence in 2022.

 

  1. Phase I rehabilitation works at the Sunyani Airport which involves the overlay of the runway is nearing completion. Phase II, which involves the extension of the runway will commence in 2022. This, when completed, will allow for commercial operation to resume at the Additionally, the communication mast obstructing flight path at the Wa Airport, was relocated to allow for resumption of commercial operations to the airport.

 

  1. Speaker, construction of the eight parking stand Northern Apron at Kotoka International Airport (KIA) is ongoing and about 31 percent complete. When completed, the project will improve the capacity of KIA to accommodate more airlines especially during peak hours.

 

  1. Furthermore, to ensure that Ghana complies with and sustains international safety and security standards at all ports, the construction of the Air Navigation Services (ANS) complex at KIA is 92 percent The facility is expected to be operational in 2022.

 

Social Sector

 

  1. Speaker, the key focus of the Social Sector is: education and training; health and health services; food and nutrition security; population management and migration for development; poverty and inequality; child protection and family welfare; support for the aged; gender equality, empowerment of women and girls; sports and recreation; youth development; social protection; disability and development; and employment and decent work.

 

  1. Policy measures in the social sector seek to promote social, economic and political inclusion for all Ghanaians and are in line with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16 & 17; and the African Union (AU)

Agenda 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 12, 13, 17, 18 & 20.

 

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Management and Administration Programme
  1. Speaker, the Ministry of Education collaborated with stakeholders to implement measures for the safe reopening of schools in January 2021. All schools were provided with infra-red thermometers to monitor the temperature of pupils, students and staff. Students and pupils were also provided with reusable nose masks and all public and private schools were fumigated and disinfected. These measures helped to curb the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, ensured the safety of pupils, students, teachers and the general public, and contributed to the smooth running of schools at all levels for the 2020/2021 academic year.

 

  1. Speaker, in 2022 the Ministry will continue to provide the necessary logistics to both public and private schools at all levels. The Ministry will also intensify the “back to school campaign” in all districts across the country to ensure that no child is left behind when schools reopen for the 2021/2022 academic year.

 

  1. Speaker, as part of efforts aimed at streamlining the professional and career progression of teachers within the appropriate competency framework in the pre- tertiary sector, the National Teaching Council (NTC) issued a total of 128,789 licenses to teachers. The Council also inducted 26,100 newly qualified teachers into the service. In addition, the training manuals for the National Pre-Tertiary Learning Assessment Framework (NPLAF) and School-Based Assessment (SBA) were developed.

 

  1. In 2021, the Ghana Education Service (GES) introduced the use of aptitude test for qualified teachers at the pre-tertiary A total of 46,273 qualified teachers sat for the aptitude test out of which 29,465 were successful. To prevent undue delays in promotion of qualified teachers, Government will, in 2022, improve on

 

the conduct of the aptitude test leveraging on lessons learnt from the one conducted in 2021.

 

  1. Speaker, the Ghana Library Authority (GhLA) continued to work on widening the content of both the digital platforms and static libraries. Government, in 2021 completed the following libraries: Nsakina Library; Captain (RTD.) S.K. Armah Library (Winneba); Neenyi Gyan II Library (Effutu Ekrofor); Kumawu Library; Dambai Library; Lower Manya Krobo Municipal Library; Amosima Library; and Janet Brako Library (Accra). This brings the total number of public libraries to 103 across the country, seven of which were renovated.

 

  1. Government added 88,697 books to the existing book stock bringing the total to 1,167,388 in 2021. In 2022, the Authority will construct two new libraries and renovate five existing ones. In addition, mobile library van outreaches will be undertaken in 100 basic schools across the

 

  1. Speaker, the Ghana Book Development Council (GBDC) will provide book booths with 40,000 reading books to 70 basic schools across the country as part of efforts to promote reading and writing among school children.

 

  1. The National Service Scheme (NSS), in fulfilment of its mandate of providing newly qualified graduates the opportunity to have practical exposure on the job both in the public and private sectors, enrolled and deployed a total of 113,560 personnel for the 2020/2021 service year. The Scheme is currently deploying 144,134 personnel who registered for the 2021/22 service

 

Basic Education Programme
  1. Speaker, Government absorbed the examination registration fees of 438,204 registered candidates from public junior high schools for the 2021 Basic Education Certificate Examinations (BECE). In 2022, Government will again absorb the examination registration fees of a projected number of 411,922 candidates.

 

  1. Speaker, in line with the new pre-tertiary education curriculum, the Ministry will conduct the maiden edition of the National Standardised Test in December 2021 for all Primary Four pupils in public basic schools to assess their proficiency in literacy and numeracy. The results of the standardised test will enable the Ministry course-correct the implementation of the new curriculum and provide the needed intervention for pupils who do not meet the proficiency levels. In 2022, the Ministry will conduct the standard test for Primary Two and Six pupils.

 

  1. The Ministry initiated the process for the implementation of a two-year pilot project to develop and integrate Information Communication Technology (ICT) into the early childhood educational The project will integrate computer- based learning solutions in 50 selected Kindergartens (KG). The project will also

 

improve and strengthen the professional capacity of KG teachers and specialists across a range of developmental domains.

 

Secondary Education Programme
  1. Speaker, the Ministry continued with the implementation of the Government’s Flagship Free SHS Programme. A total of 425,061 first-year students enrolled bringing the total intake to 1,261,495 students. In addition, first year students received the under-listed items as part of the implementation of the Free SHS Programme:
    • 4,135,284 exercise books;
    • 1,767,547 note books;
    • 395,571 physical education kits;
    • 1,734,800 cartridge art paper for visual arts students;
    • 34,696 water-based acrylic paints for visual arts students;
    • 27,391 technical drawing boards; and
    • 27,391 sets of technical

 

  1. Speaker, in line with the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education, the Ministry trained 924 Mathematics and Science Teachers. In addition, the Ministry distributed digitised lessons prepared by experienced teachers in core subjects to all SHSs. The Ministry also commenced the construction of 20 STEM centres across the country. The current status of completion of the project as at September 2021 ranges from 93 percent in Accra High SHS to 6 percent in Tumu SHS.

 

  1. Speaker, in 2021 the Ministry completed 118 projects made up of classrooms, dormitories, administration blocks, libraries and canteens at the secondary education level. The number of completed projects under the Free Senior High School Infrastructure Intervention stands at 657 out of a total of 1,119 projects from GETFUND and other funding sources.

 

  1. In 2021, the Ministry continued the construction of nine Model Senior High Schools across the country. The status of completion as at September 2021 ranges from 32 percent in Kwadaso to 95 percent in Koase Senior High Technical In 2022, the Ministry will complete these model schools.

 

  1. In recognition of the important role of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) in the country’s industrialisation agenda, the Ministry issued 2,794 Master Craft Persons and Apprentices with vouchers to access formal The training led to the award of a National TVET Qualification Framework (NTVETQF) under the Ghana TVET Voucher Project (GTVP). In addition, 2,446 Competency-Based Training learners received NTVETQF certification.

 

  1. Speaker, pursuant to Section 55 of the Pre-Tertiary Education Act, 2020 (Act 1049), the Ministry established a TVET Service to manage, oversee and implement approved national policies and programmes. In 2022, the Ministry will expand the Free SHS Programme to cover all first year students in public TVET Institutes as provided for under the Act.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will continue with the implementation of the various reforms and projects in the TVET sector, including the rehabilitation and upgrading of technical universities, upgrading and modernisation of the erstwhile 34 NVTI centres, retooling of TVET Institutes and establishing 10 State-of-the-Art TVET

 

Non-Formal Education Programme
  1. Speaker, in 2021, the Non-Formal Education Division run 2,467 classes with 51,627 learners across the country. In 2022, the Complementary Education Agency Act, 2020 (Act 1055) will be operationalised. In addition, the Agency will initiate processes for the establishment of Multipurpose Community Learning Centres in each of the 16 regions. The Agency will open additional 253 classes to bring the total number of classes to 2,720 with 68,000 learners across the country.

 

Inclusive and Special Education Programme
  1. Speaker, in 2021 the Ministry trained 1,281 teachers on how to manage and support learners with Specific Learning Difficulties. In addition, 179 officers – made up of partially sighted and blind teachers, teaching assistants and house mothers – received training on innovative teaching. In 2022, the National Council for Curriculum and Assessment will unpack the Standards-Based Curriculum and the Common Core Programme Curricula to accommodate learners with special education needs.

 

Tertiary Education Programme
  1. Speaker, the Ministry will commence the implementation of the “No Guarantor Policy” to improve access to Student Loans in the 2021/2022 academic year.

 

  1. In line with the Act establishing the University of Media Arts and Communication (UMAC), the Ministry will merge the Ghana Institute of Languages (GIL), the Ghana Institute of Journalism (GIJ) and the National Film and Television Institute (NAFTI) into a single university.

 

  1. The Ministry will implement Phase I of the Open University Ghana Programme in 2022 to expand access to quality tertiary education and skills training to the ever- increasing population, especially the youth, in

 

  1. In 2021, Ghana Tertiary Education Commission (GTEC) assessed a total of 213 new and 242 existing academic The Commission also evaluated 427 local and 658 foreign credentials. In 2022, GTEC will develop a National Ranking Framework for tertiary education institutions and publish its maiden ranking using the Framework.

 

GETFUND

  1. Speaker, Parliament gave approval to Government in 2018, to securitise a portion of the Ghana Education Trust Fund receivables for the construction and completion of various education infrastructure. The securitisation provided adequate and timely funding to accelerate the payment of liabilities to contractors; complete progressively all abandoned education projects and finance the construction of new infrastructure, especially in response to the needs of the Free SHS Programme.

 

  1. Since Parliament’s approval, the following progress has been achieved:
    • A total of GH¢2.75 billion was raised by GETFUND through a mix of syndicated loans of GH¢321 million, and a bond programme of GH¢2.43 billion between December 2018 and October 2021;
    • GETFUND successfully undertook the following interventions:
      • Paid all the outstanding liabilities amounting to GH¢838.49 million and additional GH¢297.36 million for current obligations between December 2018 and October 2021;
      • Between November 2020 and September, 2021 a total amount of GH¢1.18 billion was paid to contractors for the completion of ongoing education infrastructure projects and the provision of education supplies. In all 760 different contractors have been paid;
      • Construction of nine new model Senior High schools has commenced and are at different stages of completion across the country;
      • Construction of 881 basic school projects – 405 completed and 476 on- going;
      • Construction of 964 secondary school projects – 526 completed and 438 on-going;
      • Construction of two new training centres of excellence for the Commission for Technical and Vocational Education and Training (CTVET) are currently ongoing at Paakyi No.1 and Anyinam;
      • Procured and distributed 2,718 vehicles to various institutions and agencies under the Ministry of Education;
      • Procured and distributed 677,470 furniture items to basic and secondary schools between 2019 and 2021; and
      • Subsidised the ongoing procurement and distribution of 280,000 laptops to teachers across the

 

MINISTRY OF EMPLOYMENT AND LABOUR RELATIONS

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Management and Administration Programme
  1. Speaker, the Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations collaborated with relevant stakeholders to implement the National Labour Migration Policy (NLMP) which was approved in 2020. Additionally, a draft Bilateral Labour Agreement between Ghana and Saudi Arabia on the regulation of migrant workers was developed. The Ministry also solicited inputs from stakeholders to draft a similar Labour Agreement between Ghana and Kuwait.

 

  1. The Ministry commenced the process of reviewing the Labour Act, 2003 (Act 651) with the goal of strengthening labour administration in the country in line with international best practice. In 2022, a nationwide consultation to validate inputs into the Act will be undertaken.

 

  1. The Ministry will collaborate with the National Steering Committee on Child Labour and other stakeholders to evaluate the outcomes of the implementation of the 2nd Phase of the National Plan of Action (NPA2 2017-2021), for the elimination of the worst forms of child labour in the country. Based on the outcome and recommendations, all necessary steps will be undertaken to strengthen efforts in the fight against child

 

  1. Speaker, in 2022, the Ministry will deepen collaboration with the Tripartite constituents and all stakeholders to work collectively to maintain the peaceful industrial atmosphere in the country. The Ministry will continue to coordinate the implementation of the National Employment Policy, the National Green Jobs Strategy, the National Labour Migration Policy, and the Labour (Domestic Workers) Regulations, 2020. The Ministry will also seek approval for the National Occupational Safety and Health Policy and the Co-operatives Bill.

 

Job Creation and Development Programme
  1. Speaker, the Youth Employment Agency (YEA) engaged 82,869 beneficiaries under the various YEA modules. In 2022, the Agency will engage 106,000 beneficiaries. “The Job Centre”, which is an interactive web-based system that links job seekers to potential employers, enabled 1,185 persons to gain employment.

 

  1. The cooperatives institutions of the Ministry facilitated the formation of 2,133 new co-operative The Department of Co-operatives inspected 1,201 co- operatives and audited 616 existing cooperative societies. The Department of Co- operatives and the Ghana Co-operatives Council trained a total of 5,320 farmers and 120 artisans. The Council also organised 184 stakeholder engagements with

 

cooperative leaders and policy makers to support the promotion and development of cooperatives.

 

  1. Speaker, in 2022, the co-operative institutions will register 1,000 new co- operative societies, inspect 700 and audit 1,200 existing co-operatives societies. The Ministry will continue to strengthen the co-operative institutions to facilitate the formation of new co-operatives and provide the needed support to existing ones. The strengthening of these institutions will ensure the growth of vibrant co-operatives for job creation and economic development.

 

Skills Development Programme
  1. Speaker, the Ministry, in collaboration with the NVTI, the Opportunities Industrialisation Centres-Ghana (OICG) and the Department of Integrated Community Centres for Employable Skills (DICCES), trained a total of 7,472 persons in various trades in 2021. The NVTI also conducted tests for 32,694 candidates in various trades. The Management Development and Productivity Institute (MDPI), on the other hand, trained 633 persons in various productivity enhancement courses to improve their skills and productivity levels.

 

  1. In 2022, the Institutions will train 8,590 persons in various vocational trades and accredit 2,674 mastercraft NVTI will assess 45,871 candidates in various trade areas. MDPI will train 1,000 persons from all sectors of the economy in various management and productivity enhancement skills, and 60 SMEs in the ILO’s Sustaining Competitive and Responsible Enterprises (SCORE) Module.

 

Labour Administration Programme
  1. Speaker, the Labour Department conducted 696 workplace and establishment inspections and placed 3,231 persons in gainful employment through Public Employment Centres (PECs) and Private Employment Agencies (PEAs). The Department registered 269 workmen compensation cases and facilitated the payment of compensation to 289 persons. The Department also issued 46 Collective Bargaining Certificates. In 2022, the Department will conduct 1,800 workplace and establishment inspections and facilitate the placement of 6,500 jobseekers in jobs through the PECs and PEAs.

 

  1. Speaker, the Department of Factories Inspectorate registered 235 new factories, shops and offices, and inspected 2,570 workplaces. The Department conducted 42 industrial hygiene surveys and investigated all eight reported industrial accidents. In 2022, the Department will register 500 new factories, inspect 3,000 offices, shops and factories, undertake 100 safety and health talks and conduct 96 industrial hygiene surveys.

 

  1. The Ministry, through the Fair Wages and Salaries Commission (FWSC), negotiated the Base Pay and Pay-Point Relativity (BPPPR) for years 2021 and

 

  1. The Commission also completed job re-evaluation for two public sector institutions and negotiated conditions of service for three others. In 2022, the Commission will negotiate the BPPPR for 2023 in accordance with section 19 of the Public Financial Management (PFM) Act, 2016 (Act 921). The Commission will re-evaluate the jobs of 10 public sector institutions and conclude negotiations of conditions of service for another 15.

 

  1. Speaker, the National Pensions Regulatory Authority (NPRA) intensified efforts to get more workers in the informal sector to be enrolled onto the 3rd Tier of the 3-Tier pension scheme. Currently, there are 315,890 persons (representing 4 percent of the workforce) enrolled onto the Tier 3 pension scheme. The Authority prosecuted seven recalcitrant employers who defaulted in honouring obligations on behalf of employees. The Authority commenced pilot registration of farmers for the Cocoa Farmers Pension Scheme in August 2021.

 

  1. In 2022, the Authority projects to roll out the Farmers Pension Scheme, and expand enrolment on the 3rd Tier to 12 percent (about 947,670) of the The Authority will commence the deployment of Risk-Based Supervisory Software (RBSS) to facilitate real-time monitoring of private pension schemes.

 

MINISTRY OF YOUTH AND SPORTS

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Management and Administration Programme
  1. Speaker, Ghana continues to excel in international sporting competitions. The Black Satellites participated in and won the U-20 AFCON in Mauritania. The Ministry of Youth and Sports fulfilled the Presidential Pledge of a total amount of US$300,000 which was disbursed to 25 players and 14 officials. Additionally, cash donation was presented to the best player, best goalkeeper and the coach. The Black Stars also qualified for the 2022 African Cup of Nations to be hosted by Cameroon. In 2022, the Black stars will continue their preparation towards the AFCON and pursue qualification to the 2022 World Cup in Qatar.

 

  1. Speaker, the Ministry reconstituted the International Games and Competitions Committee to oversee Ghana’s successful participation in the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games. “Team Ghana” presented 14 athletes in five disciplines namely; Athletics, Boxing, Judo, Swimming and Weightlifting. Three members of Team Ghana excelled in Boxing, Swimming, and Athletics and their contributions were duly recognised by Government.

 

  1. Ghana Rugby participated in Africa’s 15th pre-World Cup qualification in Kampala, Uganda from 10th July to 18th July, 2021.The Ghana Rugby Football Union also organised a successful Pre-Level One Coaching and Officiating Course, as well as scouting for Hearing and Deaf In all, 29 participants benefited from the

 

training. The NSA  also organised a successful West Africa Zonal Triathlon Championship.

 

  1. Speaker, in 2022, the Ministry will participate in the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham and continue with preparatory activities towards organising and hosting the 13th African Games in Accra in 2023. The Ministry will procure sports logistics and equipment and begin the construction of a new multipurpose sports hall, hostel facilities and an olympic-size swimming pool at Borteyman in Accra.

 

  1. Speaker, some stadia across the country were renovated in 2021 and are at various stages of completion as follows:
    • Accra Sports Stadium – 98% complete;
    • Phase I of Baba Yara Stadium – 98% complete;
    • Essipong Stadium – 90% complete; and
    • Cape Coast Stadium – 60%

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will continue with the construction of the Abiriw and the New Edubiase sports stadia, and will also collaborate with the National Sports Authority to organise regional competitions (Inter-District Competitions), the Ghana National Games and the National Cross-Country

 

  1. Speaker, the Ministry hosted the 4th Youth Connekt Africa Summit in Ghana from 20th to 22nd October, 2021. The theme for the Summit was “Africa Beyond Aid – Positioning the Youth for the Post COVID Economy and AfCFTA.” About 2,000 youth across Africa attended in-person, with over one million participating virtually. The summit created a network for business partnerships, jobs creation, employment and young entrepreneurship opportunities.

 

  1. Speaker, the National Youth Authority (NYA) finalised the review of the draft National Youth Policy (2021-2030) and its Implementation Plan. The overall goal of the policy is to achieve “An empowered youth contributing positively to Ghana’s sustainable development”. In 2022, the Ministry will start the development of a 10-year Youth Development and Future Readiness Plan.

 

  1. The NYA operates 11 Youth Leadership and Skills Training Institutes across the The Authority spent GH¢3.28 million between August 2020 and August 2021 to cater for boarding, lodging, logistics, equipment and utilities for these institutions. In addition, the NYA organised career enhancement programmes for self-employed and semi-skilled youth through short courses and workshops. The Authority also provided financial support, start-up tools and equipment to deserving beneficiaries.

 

  1. Speaker, the NYA collaborated with stakeholders to implement Skills Towards Employment and Productivity (STEP) and Youth Agric Enterprise Support (YAES)

 

Projects. Feasibility studies conducted helped target 10,000 vulnerable and marginalised youth nationwide and 3,000 young people to acquire apprenticeship training through the STEP and the YAES programmes, respectively. In 2022, the Authority will continue with these programmes.

 

  1. Speaker, the first phase of the construction of 10 Youth Resource Centres (YRCs) are ongoing in 10 regions and are at various stages of completion.
    • Dormaa Ahenkro in Bono Region – 97% completed
    • Koforidua in Eastern Region – 95% completed
    • Wa in Upper West Region – 95% completed
    • Nyinahini in Ashanti Region – 92% completed
    • Dunkwa On-Offin in Central Region – 92% completed
    • Axim in Western Region – 92% completed
    • Ho in Volta Region – 90% completed
    • Navrongo in Upper East Region – 90% completed
    • Yendi in Northern Region – 87% completed
    • North Kaneshie in Greater Accra Region – 82% completed

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will complete Phase I of the YRCs and begin the construction of nine additional YRCs in the six newly created regions and some identified

 

NATIONAL COMMISSION FOR CIVIC EDUCATION

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Management and Administration Programme
  1. Speaker, the National Commission for Civic Education (NCCE) continued to implement strategies that involved broadcast van outreaches, mass media infomercials, and social media platforms, and reached an audience of 4,145,817 across the country. The Commission also organised a Trainer of Trainers’ workshop for 191 district directors on violent extremism to enhance the capacity of field staff in the operational districts in 10 regions.

 

  1. Speaker, the Commission collaborated with the Ghana Health Service to organise a virtual capacity building programme for 507 members of staff at the national, regional and district levels on COVID-19 safety protocols, vaccine hesitancy and vaccination.

 

  1. Speaker, the Commission published two monitoring and evaluation reports on the 2021 Constitution Week and Citizenship Week Celebrations. The Commission also conducted an end-line survey on the State of Corruption, Public Accountability and Environmental Governance to assess progress made on key indicators of Anti-Corruption, Rule of Law and Accountability Programmes (ARAP).

 

 

  1. The Commission undertook a study to investigate the Risk and Threat of Violent Extremism and other forms of violence in 10 border regions of The study examined Ghana’s vulnerability, instructional readiness and community awareness of responses and preventive strategies in the event of a violent attack. In 2022, the Commission will undertake a similar study in six non-border regions of Ghana, and monitor and evaluate education on citizens’ vigilance.
Civic Education Programme
  1. Speaker, the NCCE, in 2021 undertook several activities focusing on education on the COVID-19 pandemic, the 2021 Population and Housing Census, the role of Members of Parliament and District Assemblies, Peaceful Co-existence and Tolerance as a post-election activity as well as the Annual Constitution and Citizenship Week Celebration. Other training programmes included duties of Citizens, Environmental Governance, Child Protection, Democracy and Good Governance, Human Rights, Public Order Act, engagements on the National Anti- Corruption Action Plan (NACAP), Social Auditing and Civic Education Club (CEC) activities.

 

  1. Speaker, in 2022, in relation to its mandate the Commission will undertake various programmes including: good citizenship campaign; monitor and evaluate the implementation of good societal campaign to promote positive national values; attitudinal change; patriotism; trust; pursuit of excellence and discipline; child protection; engagement on greening Ghana; sanitation and waste segregation; and CEC activities in schools.

 

MINISTRY OF CHIEFTAINCY AND RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022
  1. Speaker, in 2021, the Ministry of Chieftaincy and Religious Affairs inaugurated four traditional councils in the Upper West Region, and these are Banu, Manwe, Sankana and Takpo. The inauguration deepened collaboration, displayed custom and customary practices and involved the citizenry. In 2022, the Ministry will initiate the processes to construct six Regional Houses of Chiefs for the Ahafo, Bono East, North East, Oti, Savannah and Western North Regions.

 

  1. Speaker, as part of the Ministry’s programme and activities on Christian Pilgrimage, the Ministry mapped sites for local Christian pilgrimage to deepen positive values for development and appreciation of the solemnity of Christian sites and heritage. The sites are programmed to attract foreign visitors and serve as sources of revenue generation for the traditional authorities and local governments.

 

  1. Speaker, in 2022, the Ministry will continue to find and map additional sites for Christian pilgrimage, heritage and tourism in Ghana. The Ministry will also

 

continue to facilitate Christian pilgrimage to the State of Israel. In addition, the Ministry will finalise the draft policy on religion, and directives on religious pilgrimage. This will guide the observance of protocols on religion and the adherence to guidelines.

 

  1. Speaker, to strengthen the mechanisms for the settlement of chieftaincy matters, the Ministry commenced the process of putting together relevant materials on traditional authorities in the form of compendia. The compendia contained relevant information on traditional authorities and enabled an appreciation of all issues involved in chieftaincy in Ghana.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will facilitate the drafting of lines of succession to stools and skins in 10 identified traditional areas and will validate the outcome through the respective Regional Houses of Chiefs. These documents will then be forwarded to the Attorney General’s Department for finalisation. The Ministry will also publish the Compendium on Chieftaincy and Traditional Authorities. This will entail extensive research into Chieftaincy cases, documents and

 

  1. Speaker, the Ministry completed work on five draft Legislative Instruments on the codification of lines of succession to stools and skins, and forwarded them to the Attorney General’s Department. The draft Instruments are in respect of Adjaade, Avatime, Builda, Mion and Techiman.

 

  1. The National House of Chiefs approved and recommended 484 chieftaincy declaration forms for entry into the National Register of Chiefs and for publication in the Chieftaincy Bulletin. The objective is to report on the current status of

 

  1. The Ministry will begin the automation of the judicial processes in the National House of Chiefs and later replicate in selected Regional Houses of Chiefs to aid the speedy adjudication of

 

MINISTRY OF HEALTH

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Management and Administration Programme
  1. Speaker, the Ministry of Health continued with efforts to achieve Universal Health Coverage (UHC) for Ghana. In line with this objective, the Ministry, among other interventions, developed a comprehensive strategy and action plan for local vaccine production. The Ministry also set up a secretariat to formally start work on establishing a Ghana Centre for Disease Control (CDC). In 2022, the Ministry will continue with efforts to establish the CDC, and lead efforts towards the local production of vaccines.

 

  1. Speaker, the Ministry developed a new Health Sector Medium-Term Development Plan (HSMTDP 2022-2025), a Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) Policy and a Food Safety Policy. The Ministry is also developing a Hospital Infrastructure Strategy to bring clarity on infrastructure planning.

 

  1. The Ministry will complete the oxygen policy to ensure that the challenges facing our facilities are reduced, if not completely addressed. The policy document will be made available to stakeholders for consultation. In addition, a National Public Health Laboratory System Policy will be developed to guide the laboratory systems in Ghana.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will review the National Health Financing Strategy to guide the implementation of the UHC road map and the new Health Sector Medium- Term Development Plan. To deal with the abuse of mental health patients, the Ministry will establish Mental Health Tribunals.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ministry launched the National Human Resource Policy and Strategy for Health. As part of the implementation, the Ministry set up two committees to draft strategic documents to attract and retain health workers in deprived areas. This will be finalised in 2022.

 

Health Service Delivery Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, the Cape Coast Teaching Hospital introduced Oncology, Paediatrics, Surgical, Gynaecology, and Medical Faculties in June 2021. The Hospital further held partnership meetings with the African Diaspora Development Institute to establish Endolaproscopy services and an innovative Bed Bureau Unit (BBU) to address the “no bed syndrome”.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Tamale Teaching Hospital completed renovation works on the Oncology Centre. The Hospital drafted Occupational Health, Safety and Healthcare Policy to guide health service delivery. The Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital integrated mental health services by providing 11 Psychiatry Beds and started outreach services within its catchment area. The Pantang Psychiatric Hospital also instituted home visits and follow-ups on mental patients.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Electronic Health Medical Records System (LIGHTWAVE), which was started at Cape Coast Teaching Hospital, was deployed to all teaching and regional hospitals and 60 other health facilities across the country. In 2022, it will be expanded to all district hospitals and other targeted health facilities.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ministry established six Ambulance Service Secretariats in the newly created regions. In 2022, the Ministry will procure 100 more ambulances to augment the existing fleet.

 

Human Resource for Health Development Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, in 2021, the College of Pharmacy developed 11 new curricula to strengthen the training of specialised pharmacists. The College of Nurses and Midwives also introduced a new faculty in Paediatric Nursing Education, while the Ghana College of Physicians and Surgeons drafted guidelines for postgraduate training.

 

  1. In 2022, the new curricula for the College of Pharmacy will be rolled out, and the draft guidelines for the College of Physicians and Surgeons will be implemented. Similarly, some Nursing and Midwifery training schools will be upgraded to offer specialised training.

 

Health Sector Regulation Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, in 2021 the Ministry developed and launched the Recommended Herbal Medicines List (RHML) and guidelines for evaluation of herbal medicines and the Recommended List will be implemented in 2022.

 

  1. The Nurses and Midwives Council and the Health Facilities Regulatory Agency (HeFRA) digitised operations by going online. HeFRA also developed and launched Standards for 53 levels of care to enhance registration and monitoring of health facilities. In 2022, the rest of the health regulatory agencies and authorities will continue with the digitisation agenda.

 

  1. The Medical and Dental Council developed a policy on Practitioners Stamp, Name Tags and Professional Apparel. The policy will be implemented in 2022. The Ministry will also continue to work on Legislative Instruments (LIs) to support and strengthen the Regulatory Agencies.

 

Health Infrastructure
  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ministry will accelerate the implementation of the Agenda 111 Project comprising 101 district hospitals, seven regional hospitals and three psychiatric hospitals. Cadastral plans for 91 district hospital sites are ready.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ministry completed the comprehensive treatment and quarantine facility at Dodowa and constructed a polyclinic at Bamboi and four district hospitals at Buipe, Sawla, Somanya and Tolon. In addition, the Ministry constructed seven CHPS compounds at Akaaso, Akaasu, Akyem Mampong, Ahankrasu, Koforidua (Near Offinso), Samproso and Tiawia.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will commence the construction of 11 No. 40-bed and 1 No. 30-bed hospitals in the Ashanti, Bono, Greater Accra and Eastern Regions. The Ministry will also reconstruct the Tema General Hospital and the Central Medical Stores and continue the construction of the La, Nkoranza and Shama hospitals.

 

  1. The Ministry will also construct a 400-bed Obstetrics and Gynaecology Block as well as a Urology and Nephrology Centre at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital. Furthermore, the Ministry will construct three new Trauma, Accident and Emergency Centres at Anyinam, Dormaa and Obuasi Hospitals. Additionally, the Ministry will construct a Maternity Block at Enyiresi Hospital.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the following COVID-19 treatment centres will be completed in 2022: Adaklu; Aflao; Asawinso; Cape Coast; Dodowa; Elubo, Goaso; Keta, Korle- Bu; Kumasi South; Nalerigu; Pantang; Sewua; Sunyani; Takoradi; and Zebilla.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ministry, as part of the effort to expand drone services in the delivery of critical medical supplies, colaborated with Zipline, to construct two new distribution centres at Anum and Abujuro in the Eastern and Oti Regions, respectively. The Anum centre will cover 98 percent of Kwahu Afram Plains North, 70 percent of Kwahu Affram Plains South and 80 percent of Volta Region. The centre will serve 366 health facilities, out of which 54 percent are currently hard to reach.

 

  1. The Abujuro centre will serve 95 percent of the Oti Region as well as the riverine parts of the Sene East, Sene West and Pru East Districts of the Bono East Region. Parts of the Northern and Savannah Regions will also be covered within Zipline’s 80km service radius. The centre will cover 222 health facilities of which 52 percent are presently hard to reach.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, to support the Ministry in the distribution of COVID-19 vaccines requiring ultra-low storage temperatures, Zipline procured 3No. 700 litre ultra- low temperature freezers to aid the country in the distribution of vaccines to hard- to-reach areas. Zipline currently has the capacity to store approximately 1 million Pfizer-Bio NTech doses, 468,000 Moderna doses, and 1.7 million doses of either AstraZeneca or Sputnik vaccines all at the same time.

 

Update on COVID-19 Pandemic and Vaccines Roll-out Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, as at 5th November, 2021, the total confirmed cases of COVID-19 were 130,608 with an active case count of 1,274 and 1,203 deaths. A total of 1,909,489 tests have been conducted with a positivity rate of 6.8 percent. To help curb the spread of the pandemic, the Ministry of Health and its Agencies continued to lead the implementation of the National Strategic Response Plan. This Plan guided all activities carried out as part of Ghana’s response to the pandemic.

 

Table 28: COVID-19 Update as at 5th November, 2021

 

Category

 

Total no. Tested

Number of Positive

Cases

 

Recovered/ Discharged

 

Dead

 

Active

Routine Surveillance

446,782

49,609

 

125,320

 

 

1,203

 

 

1,274

Enhanced Contact Tracing

876,926

78,092

International travellers (KIA)

585,781

2,907

2,811

Total

1,909,489

130,608

128,131

1,203

1,274

Source: MoH

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the response and preventive strategy to the COVID-19 outbreak was initially focused on non-pharmaceutical interventions, including wearing of face masks, physical distancing, and hand hygiene. As global efforts towards the search for COVID-19 vaccine yielded positive results, COVID-19 vaccination has become an additional preventive measure to the already existing protocols. Vaccine deployment started under Emergency Use Authorisation (EUA) across the globe. Five brands of vaccines, namely AstraZeneca (COVISHIELD and VAXZEVRIA), Sputnik-V, Janssen (Johnson and Johnson), Moderna and Pfizer- BioNTech are currently authorised by the Food and Drugs Authority (FDA) for use in Ghana.

 

  1. Ghana started COVID-19 vaccine roll-out in March 2021 with an initial 600,000 doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine received through the COVAX Facility. The launch of Ghana’s COVID-19 vaccination roll-out was performed by H.E. The President, Nana Addo Danquah Akufo-Addo, who was the first person to be vaccinated on 1st March, 2021.

 

  1. Vaccine distribution and deployment strategies have been based on segmentation of the population informed by risk of exposure, disease severity, business continuity and national security. Accordingly, the first phase of the deployment that targeted population segments of high-risk groups, mainly: health care workers; persons who are 60 years old or above; persons with underlying medical conditions; frontline security personnel; critical government sector workers; other essential workers; and other persons most at risk.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, prior to the deployment, the Honourable Minister for Health, through the Director General of the Ghana Health Service (GHS), constituted a Technical Working Group (TWG) for vaccine deployment. Through the TWG, a National Vaccination and Deployment Plan (NVDP) was developed using the core principles of the WHO Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunisation (SAGE)

 

framework for the allocation and prioritisation of COVID-19 vaccination. Delivery strategies have been varied, including static or health facility-based, community outreaches, vaccination mobile clinics, campout to island and riverine communities and a combination of these.

 

  1. An initial target of 20 million persons was earmarked to be vaccinated by end of 2021. Ultimately, the entire population, inclusive of children and pregnant women, will be considered for vaccination as more safety and efficacy data become available.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, to overcome vaccine hesitancy and increase demand, a communication strategy was developed with focus on stakeholder mapping and community engagement. The Ministry used modern communication techniques to develop infographics, jingles, posters, fliers as well as Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs). Several media outlets, including mass media, local FM stations, community information centres, and social media were used for demand generation and risk communication. The NCCE and Information Services Department supported the Ghana Health Service in communication and community engagement activities.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, a total of 8,421,630 doses of AstraZeneca, Sputnik-V, Johnson & Johnson, Moderna and Pfizer vaccines have been received with AstraZeneca accounting for approximately 55.4 percent, of total doses as shown in Table 29. The COVAX facility has provided 5,224,230 doses representing 62 percent of all doses received in the country as at 8th November, 2021.

 

Table 29: Summary of Vaccines Received, Feb- 8 Nov 2021:

Vaccine Brand Name

Quantity received

Prop (%)

Doses Distributed

Doses available

AstraZeneca

4,662,270

55.4

4,335,970

326,300

COVID-19

Vaccine Janssen

 

1,178,450

 

14.0

 

422,450

 

756,000

Moderna COVID- 19 vaccine

 

1,229,620

 

14.6

 

1,229,620

 

0

Pfizer-BioNTech

1,330,290

15.8

20,901

1,309,389

Sputnik-V

21,000

0.2

21,000

0

Grand Total

8,421,630

100.0

6,029,941

2,391,689

Source: MoH. As at 8th November, 2021 the wastage rate is approximately 5 percent.

 

  1. Mr Speaker as at 8th November, 2021 over 2.5 million persons have been vaccinated with at least one dose. Of these, 835,989 are fully vaccinated (i.e., have received two doses of AstraZeneca or Sputnik-V, or one dose of Johnson

 

and Johnson vaccine). Approximately 93 percent of vaccines administered are AstraZeneca; 6.0 percent being Johnson and Johnson while Sputnik-V and Moderna constitute approximately 1 percent.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, currently, vaccination is ongoing in all 16 regions and 261 districts across the country as part of Phase 2 of the vaccination exercise targeting persons 18 years and above, excluding pregnant women. The following vaccines: AstraZeneca (986,400), Pfizer (3,472,560) and Johnson and Johnson (2,217,600) are expected by the end of 2021.

 

  1. Additional 15 million doses of Johnson and Johnson vaccines will be purchased by the Government of Ghana with support from a World Bank facility through the African Vaccine Acquisition Trust (AVAT) of the African Union, and are expected over scheduled monthly deliveries through 2023.

 

National Health Insurance Authority
  1. Mr. Speaker, in 2021 the National Health Insurance Authority (NHIA) improved claims management processes with emphasis on e-claims and paperless systems at all four Claims Processing Centres (CPCs). A total of 1,834 providers from eight regions were trained in the electronic submission of claims. The Authority expects 60 percent of providers to submit electronic claims by December 2021.

 

  1. As of September 2021, the Authority’s total enrolment stood at 15,161,655 out of a target population of 18,210,128. As part of the tariff review processes, the Authority carried out a health service costing with stakeholder validation. The Authority also revised credentialing tools to allow lower level facilities to be assessed and enrolled onto the scheme. The credentialing application processes were also digitised.

 

  1. In 2022, the Authority will continue with the digitalisation of claims and ensure that the remaining 40 percent of providers submit claims electronically and increase membership enrolment coverage from 55 percent to 57 percent. The tariffs will be revised to allow coverage of childhood cancers and long-term family planning services. CHPS facilities working closely with Health Centres will be enrolled onto the Scheme to help increase access to affordable and quality health care.

 

MINISTRY OF GENDER, CHILDREN AND SOCIAL PROTECTION

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Gender Equality and Equity Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection collaborated with stakeholders to embark on school and youth outreach programmes. The programme sensitised 1,262 young ladies and 185 young men in the Ashanti,

 

Central, Eastern, and Volta Regions on their sexual and reproductive health rights, gender-based violence, gender roles and the importance of Girl-Child Education.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ministry organised various community sensitisation dialogues for 370 traditional and religious leaders in the Savannah, Upper East, Upper West and Western Regions using the Child Marriage Tool Kits. In 2022, the Ministry will continue with the sensitisation programmes on Sexual and Gender-Based Violence (SGBV), early-child marriage, women’s reproductive health rights and harmful cultural practices.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ministry observed and celebrated the 2021 International Women’s Day to increase awareness on gender equality and women’s empowerment. The Ministry engaged women at Agobgloshie and Madina Markets on responsible parenting, SGBV, and how to observe COVID-19 protocols. In 2022, the Ministry will advocate for the passage of the Affirmative Action Bill as well as observe and participate in all International Days that affect men and women, including International Women’s Day, International Men’s Day, Mother’s Day and Father’s Day.

 

Children Rights Promotion, Protection and Development Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ministry launched the Inter Sectoral Standard Operating Procedure for Child and Family Welfare and subsequently trained 240 stakeholders from 40 selected districts. In addition, the Ministry provided care and counselling to 330 children and young adults in three government homes and two subvented residential homes for children.

 

  1. To ratify the Convention on the Right of the Child (CRC), the Ministry submitted Ghana’s 6th & 7th Combined Report on the United Nations Convention on the Right of the Child to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs for submission to the United Nations. In 2022, the Ministry will continue to sensitise the public and stakeholders on the development, protection and promotion of the rights of children in Ghana.

 

Social Development Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ministry continued with stakeholder consultations to prepare an amendment to Act 715 and its draft Legislative Instrument to conform to the provisions of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability (UNCRPD).

 

  1. The Ministry monitored the management and disbursement of 3 percent of the District Assembly Common Fund (DACF) for Persons With Disability (PWDs) in 29 MMDAs to ensure the targeted beneficiaries receive the funds. In 2022, the Ministry will continue with the monitoring and effective management of the disbursement of the Common Fund for PWDs.

 

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ministry in 2021, registered 362 new day-care centres in six regions and renewed the licenses of 769 existing ones. The Ministry also monitored five Government Day Care centres to ensure they are operating based on set standards. In addition, 150 children in foster care were monitored to ensure that they were living in good conditions.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will continue to support vulnerable children and disintegrated families and will monitor and license day-care centres, foster parents and residential homes for children. In addition, the Ministry will provide juvenile offenders with character reformation programmes, and develop a policy to address streetism.

 

Ghana School Feeding Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ghana School Feeding Programme fed 3,448,065 pupils in 10,832 public basic schools with one hot nutritious meal every school going day in 2021. The Programme provided employment for 32,496 caterers and created a ready market for local farmers.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ministry collaborated with the Ghana Education Service (GES) to collate and upload public school data onto the ONA database to assist with real time reports on the daily performance of caterers. The Ministry will undertake continuous monitoring to ensure effective and efficient school feeding service delivery.

 

The Livelihood Empowerment Against Poverty (LEAP) Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, the programme paid five cycles of LEAP cash grants to 344,023 households and registered 76 percent of all LEAP beneficiaries onto the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS). In 2022, the Ministry will facilitate the disbursement of the bi-monthly cash grants to beneficiaries. LEAP beneficiaries assessed to be above the extreme poverty line will be graduated into a productive livelihood inclusion programme.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ministry extended the LEAP Electronic reporting application to cover all districts. In 2022, the Ministry will pilot the reassessment plan of LEAP beneficiaries to inform a subsequent nationwide rollout of the plan.

 

Domestic Violence Secretariat and Human Trafficking Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, to provide information and support for survivors of Domestic or Sexual and Gender-Based Violence, the Ministry collaborated with stakeholders to launch the Orange Support Centre which operates using a toll-free line and BOAME App for ease of case reporting and resolution. In 2022, the Ministry will operationalise the Victims of Domestic Violence Support Fund and continue to provide shelter and support to victims and survivors of domestic violence.

 

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ministry developed guidelines for paralegals on handling issues of SGBV and a Domestic Violence Information Portal (DVIP) to serve as a national source of data on domestic violence and child marriage. In 2022, the Ministry will train families of domestic violence victims and intensify awareness on issues of domestic violence, Child Marriage, SGBV as well as dangers of the practices of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM). In addition, the Ministry will print and disseminate the new National Domestic Violence Policy and Plan of Action, the DV Act, 2007, Act 732, and its accompanying legislative instrument, L.I. 2237 (2016).

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ministry provided comprehensive trauma-informed care to 503 victims of Human Trafficking in Human Trafficking Adult and Children’s shelters. The Ministry also supported the reintegration of 55 victims of human trafficking into society. In 2022, the Ministry will provide comprehensive trauma care to survivors of Human Trafficking, and review, finalise and implement the Human Trafficking National Plan of Action (NPA) in the areas of prevention, protection, prosecution and partnership.

 

NATIONAL LABOUR COMMISSION

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Management and Administration Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, in 2021, the National Labour Commission settled labour and industrial disputes within one to three months of notification. In all, the Commission received 822 complaints between 1st January and 30th August, 2021. The newly opened regional offices facilitated the dispute resolution processes in line with decentralisation of the services of the Commission. In 2022, the Commission will develop effective mechanisms for managing and handling workplace differences for timely resolution of labour disputes.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Commission recorded a total of 16 strikes during the period mainly within the public sector. The Commission effectively resolved about 70 percent of these disputes while the remaining 30 percent are undergoing the resolution processes. In addition, the Commission issued 37 orders to defaulting parties to remedy infractions of the Law and noncompliance with terms and agreements reached between the parties. So far, the Commission has rendered 42 rulings and decisions upon determination of those disputes.

 

  1. In 2022, the Commission will continue to empower the Regional Offices in three regions – Ashanti, Greater Accra and Western Regions – to make them effective in the delivery of services. The Commission will also establish two more regional offices to further decentralise its services.
Public Safety Sector

 

 

  1. The main focus of the Public Safety Sector is: human security and public safety; and law and order. Policy measures in the Public Safety Sector are in line with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 3, 8, 9, 10, and 16; and the AU Agenda 11, 12, and 13, which seek to ensure effective, accountable, transparent and responsive institutions that provide protection at all levels.

 

OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL AND MINISTRY OF JUSTICE

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Law Administration Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, the Office of the Attorney General continued to defend the interest of the State in the justice delivery system. The Office represented the State in 141 civil cases which could have resulted in the payment of huge sums of money to plaintiffs as judgement debts. Notable among them were:
  • A plaintiff claim of GH¢1.27 billion as outstanding judgment debt against the State was contested and judgment of only GH¢14,689 (including interest) granted against the State; and
  • Another plaintiff claim of GH¢11.00 million was contested and judgement of less than GH¢2.00 million granted against the

 

  1. The Office reviewed and advised Government on 35 agreements and contracts to ensure value for money, gave 81 advices on various petitions and requests, and provided 45 legal opinions and advice to MDAs and MMDAs.

 

  1. In 2022, the Office projects to represent and defend the State in 400 civil suits, review 130 agreements and contracts of MDAs and MMDAs as well as resolve and respond to 270 petitions. In addition, the Office will provide about 180 legal opinions and advice on requests received.

 

  1. The Office of the Attorney General received 910 criminal cases and initiated prosecutions in 874 across the country.

 

  1. In 2022, the Office envisages to receive about 1,900 criminal cases from the various investigative bodies out of which it will prosecute at least 1,700. The Office will give 500 pieces of advice to the Police on criminal cases, and as well resolve 400 out of a projected 550 petitions to be received.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Office prepared 145 pieces of legislation made up of six substantive legislations and 139 subsidiary legislations which were enacted into law. The substantive legislation drafted and enacted into law are the:
    • Energy Sector Levies (Amendment) Act, 2021 (Act 1064);
    • Penalty and Interest Waiver Act, 2021 (Act 1065);
    • Income Tax (Amendment) Act, 2021 (Act 1066);

 

  • Financial Sector Recovery Levy Act, 2021 (Act 1067);
  • COVID-19 Health Recovery Levy Act, 2021 (Act 1068); and
  • Appropriation Act, 2021 (Act 1069).

 

  1. The subsidiary legislation drafted and enacted into law included: Civil Service (Ministries) Instrument, 2021 E.I 12; Imposition of Restrictions (Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Pandemic) Instrument, 2021 E.I. 17; State-Lands (Ho-Site for Women’s Training Institute) Instrument, 2021 E.I 46; Public Holiday (Exemption) Instrument, 2021 E.l. 118; Public Holiday (Declaration) Instrument, 2021 E.I 136; and Public Holiday (Exemption) Instrument, 2021 E.I. 137.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, in 2022, the Office will draft at least 20 pieces of substantive legislation and 200 pieces of subsidiary legislation.

 

Copyright and Entity Administration Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, the Registrar-General’s Department (RGD) registered 61,797 businesses and companies, 819 marriages and 758 trademarks. In addition, 541 trademarks were filed and 300 estates administered.

 

  1. The Copyright Office registered 484 copyright works as of end August 2021, held a sensitisation programme for 425 police recruits and undertook a 2-day anti- piracy media education.

 

  1. In 2022, the Registrar-General’s Department projects to register 97,000 businesses and 2,400 marriages. The Ghana Intellectual Property Office (GIPO) expects to register 1,900 Trademarks and file 1,800 Trademarks. In addition, the Copyright Office will register 1,200 copyright works.

 

  1. The Law Reform Commission prepared a background paper on Unfair Contract Terms, submitted the final report of the Occupier’s Liability Bill to the Office of the Attorney General and completed the memorandum on the draft bill on the Law of Defamation.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, in 2022, the Law Reform Commission will work on the background paper based on research report from key stakeholders, and hold major key stakeholders workshop aimed at reviewing sections of the Criminal Offences Act, 1960 (Act 29).

 

  1. The Council for Law Reporting sold several volumes of the Ghana Law Reports and Review of Ghana Law, published 700 copies of the 2018-2019 Volume 1 Ghana Law Reports and prepared manuscripts of the 2018-2019 Volume 2 Ghana Law Reports. The Indexing (digitising) of the Law Report Index is about 95 percent complete and will be published by the end of 2021.

 

  1. In 2022, the Council will publish 700 copies of the 2016-2017 Ghana Law Report Volume 2 as well as publish 700 copies of the 2020-2021 Ghana Law Report Volumes 1 and 2, and publish 500 copies of the 2016-2020 Review of Ghana Law.

 

Management of Economic and Organised Crime Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, the Economic and Organised Crime Office (EOCO) directly recovered an amount of GH¢1.95 million into the Consolidated Fund, and GH¢1.64 million as indirect recovery to other institutions from proceeds of crime as at the end of September 2021. In addition, the Office investigated 143 cases, with 19 cases being prosecuted at various courts, and one conviction secured.

 

  1. In 2022, EOCO projects an amount of GH¢4 million as direct and indirect recoveries from proceeds of crime. The Office also projects to investigate 450 cases.

 

Legal Education Programme
  1. The General Legal Council (Ghana School of Law) enrolled 312 lawyers to the Bar. The Council received 98 complaints against lawyers out of which 83 disciplinary cases were disposed. The Law School conducted entrance examination for 2,824 applicants for admissions into the Ghana School of Law out of which a total of 790 students passed and gained admission.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ghana School of Law expects to conduct entrance examinations for 2,500 applicants and anticipates to admit 800 students into the Ghana School of Law while 700 students are expected to be called to the Bar. The General Legal Council is expected to handle 180 disciplinary proceedings against lawyers.

 

OFFICE OF THE LEGAL AID COMMISSION

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Management and Administration Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, in order to enhance access to legal aid, the Office of the Legal Aid Commission opened new district offices in Asamankese, Kpando, Mamponteng, Obuasi and Suhum. The Commission trained 40 staff in basic Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) Laws in Legal Aid Delivery, 40 staff in ADR Mediation, and 34 lawyers in Criminal Justice and ADR Delivery.

 

  1. The Commission completed and operationalised its Scheme of Service, Legal Aid Policy, Strategic Plan and Guide to Legal Aid Delivery.

 

Legal Aid Services Programme
  1. The Commission received 1,658 civil and criminal court cases and resolved 734 of them. It also received 5,392 cases and resolved 3,904 using the ADR mediation

 

mechanisms. In addition, the Commission continued with education and sensitisation programme on various radio stations in the regions.

 

  1. In 2022, the Commission will operationalise the Bongo, Kade, Nalerigu, Nangode, Nkwanta, Nsawam, Sandema, Tongo and Walewale district offices. It also plans to open offices in the Bono East and Western North Regions and start recruitment of lawyers, ADR practitioners and administrators to manage these offices.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Volta Regional Office at Ho is 70 percent complete and expected to be fully completed in 2022. Construction works on the Kyebi and Koforidua district offices will commence while the Paralegal System will also be operationalised.

 

MINISTRY OF DEFENCE

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Management and Administration Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, the implementation of the “Earned Dollar Payment Policy” for troops deployed for Peacekeeping Operations continued in 2021. The Ghana Armed Forces contributed 2,034 troops with equipment towards international peacekeeping efforts in several conflict zones.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry of Defence will continue to contribute troops and equipment towards international peacekeeping efforts, based on the invitation of the United Nations Peacekeeping Mission to strengthen Ghana’s role in international peacekeeping affairs.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, Phase I of the Military Housing Project across all garrisons is progressing steadily and is about 60 percent complete. The Project, when completed, will ease the acute accommodation challenges of the Ghana Armed Forces to ensure combat readiness in times of emergencies. In 2022, the Ministry will continue with Phase II of the Housing Project.

 

  1. The modernisation of the Military Academy Training School at Teshie into a world class institution is also ongoing and is about 70 percent complete. In 2022, the Ministry will continue the project to ensure its completion.

 

  1. In 2022, Government will continue to transform Ghana Armed Forces into a world-class security institution with modern infrastructure, including accommodation, health and training facilities.

 

Armed Forces Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, to ensure peace and security across the country, the Ghana Armed Forces continued to collaborate with other Security Agencies in the following

 

operations: COWLEG, CALM LIFE, HALT, GONGGONG and VANGUARD to provide security to civil society and check illegal logging and mining to control environmental degradation.

 

  1. Additionally, the establishment of 10 Mechanised Battalion at Wa, 11 Mechanised Battalion at Bawku, 3 Field Workshop and 3 Mechanical Transport Company have improved security and continued to deter threats of terrorism from the Northern Border.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ghana Armed Forces will continue to provide surveillance of Ghana’s airspace, territorial waters and boundaries and also collaborate with other Security Agencies to ensure internal peace and security.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the construction of the Forward Operating Base (FOB) at Ezinlibo in the Western Region is progressing steadily and is about 25 percent complete. The project is part of the national strategic programme to protect the country’s oil and gas resources. In addition, the Ministry has initiated processes to establish 12 FOBs and three logistics support stations along the northern borders of the country to prevent cross border crimes and terrorist infiltration.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, to ensure that the Navy protects our Exclusive Economic Zone, the Ministry of Defence will acquire Navy ships and fast patrol boats to facilitate maritime activities.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ghana Airforce will take delivery of the K8 Aircraft as well as oversee the manufacturing of its L-39 NG Fighter and Trainer Aircraft.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the structural design and financial proposal for the execution of Phase III of the 37 Military Hospital Expansion Project are being reviewed. Construction works will commence in 2022.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ministry continued with the expanded version of the Army Headquarters which will accommodate units under the Command. Work is progressing steadily with work done currently at 30 percent. In addition, the Ghana Armed Forces will continue the rehabilitation of barracks roads in all garrisons across the country.

 

Armed Forces Capacity Building Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, Government continues to enhance the capacity of the Ghana Armed Forces to enable them continuously perform their duties of forestalling external aggression, safeguarding territorial integrity and also contributing to international peacekeeping efforts. In 2022, the Ghana Armed Forces will continue to enhance capacity of officers and recruit about 3,000 personnel.

 

COMMISSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS AND ADMINISTRATIVE JUSTICE

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Management and Administration Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, the Commission on Human Rights and Administrative Justice (CHRAJ) continued with the reconstruction of the Head Office, opened 32 new district offices, upgraded six new regional offices, renovated the Bono East regional office and recruited 220 new staff.

 

Human Rights Programme
  1. The Commission investigated 6,200 cases on human rights, administrative justice, corruption and breaches of code of conduct for public officers in 2021. It will investigate 9,900 of such cases in 2022. The Commission also carried out 2,466 public education and sensitisation activities on human rights and plans to undertake 5,000 public education and sensitisation activities in 2022.

 

Administrative Justice Programme
  1. The Commission organised a sensitisation workshop for heads of departments and Chief Executive Officers in the public sector on the commission’s oversight role on actions and decisions of public officials and public services. It also collaborated with the Public Sector Reform Secretariat to roll out the Grievance Redress & Capacity Building of Client Service Units in MDAs as part of the Public Sector Reform for Results Project (PSRRP).

 

  1. The Commission investigated 205 Administrative Justice cases and carried out 629 public education and sensitisation activities on Administrative Justice.

 

Anti-Corruption Programme
  1. The Commission visited 135 MMDAs and 150 MDAs to verify NACAP implementation reports for 2017-2019. In addition, the Commission disseminated the 2020 NACAP Annual Progress Report and commenced preparations for the first Actual Corruption Survey in Ghana.

 

  1. The Commission engaged 100 MDAs on Public Service Integrity Programme (PSIP), including enforcement of the Code of Conduct for Public Officers, Asset Declaration regime, Conflict of Interest rules and Gift Policy. It also completed investigation of 47 cases on corruption and breaches of code of conduct for public officers and carried out 776 public education and sensitisation activities on anti- corruption and NACAP.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, in 2022, the Commission will continue to monitor the implementation of NACAP and complete its first Actual Corruption Survey in Ghana. In addition, the Commission will commence Corruption Risk Assessment for 10 new organisations, and partner the Public Sector Reform Secretariat to roll

 

out implementation of Service Charters for MDAs and MMDAs in response to public demand for better service delivery.

 

JUDICIAL SERVICE

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Court Administration Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, in achieving the objective of improving access to justice, the Judiciary dispensed with 13 Constitutional Review Cases. In 2020/21 legal year, 72,568 new cases were filed and a total of 63,293 cases, including backlog cases were disposed of. In 2022, it is projected that a total of 122,803 new cases will be filed and 99,207 will be tried.

 

  1. The pilot Online Court System, “Virtual Courts”, was successfully concluded. The Judicial Service is acquiring equipment and software applications for a full roll- out to 138 selected district, circuit and high courts. The online technology systems initiative of court sittings, will promote COVID-19 social distancing protocols. Additionally, the Courts Computerisation and Automation Programme with a current coverage of 51 percent will be continued.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, under the Judicial Infrastructure Development Agenda, the Judicial Service, in collaboration with the Ministry of Local Government, Decentralisation and Rural Development and DACF, started the building of 98 courthouses and

121 residential facilities. This is aimed at revamping Judicial Service infrastructure in the country. Preparatory works towards the construction of the new Judicial Training Institute will continue and the Wa High Court Complex Building completed in 2022.

 

Alternative Dispute Resolution Programme
  1. Under the Judicial Service’s ADR system, in which cases are settled outside the traditional court systems, 4,189 cases were referred for mediation. A total of 1,763 out of 3,500 cases were successfully mediated. In 2022, about 3,600 will be arbitrated out of 5,500 cases expected to be received. A total of 131 courts were connected to the ADR system and additional 151 courts will be connected in 2022.

 

MINISTRY OF THE INTERIOR

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022 Management and Administration Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, in 2021, the Ministry of The Interior facilitated the submission of the draft Narcotics Control Commission Regulations 2021 to the Office of the Attorney-General for consideration. The Ministry also facilitated the procurement

 

of logistics for border patrol management and the implementation of the Northern Border Project.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, in 2022, the Ministry will monitor the implementation of the Northern Border Project as well as the installation of a new security system at the Kotoka International Airport and the major land borders. The Ministry will continue to streamline services provided to the public and enhance revenue generation.

 

Conflict and Disaster Management Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, the National Commission on Small Arms and Light Weapons finalised arrangements with the Ghana Police Service to carry out training in weapon marking in the Accra and Tema Regional Commands. The weapon marking will promote accountability and easy tracing of fire arms. In 2022, the Commission and the Service will embark on physical stocktaking, collection and destruction of confiscated illicit small arms in Police armouries and exhibit stores currently not before the law courts in the Ahafo, Bono and Bono East Regions.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, Phase I of the Small Arms Incidents Database Management System was completed and training of staff of the Commission and selected implementing agencies was carried out.

 

  1. In 2021, the Ghana National Fire Service attended to 4,442 fire outbreaks and undertook 2,934 fire education activities in various languages on radio and television stations. The Service also conducted 4,648 fire audits and inspections at public and residential premises in line with fire safety standards, issued 1,670 new fire certificates and renewed 7,249 fire certificates.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, 928 officer cadets underwent vigorous training programmes at the Fire Academy and Training School. In addition, 1,634 recruits successfully passed out. The Service commenced the recruitment process for 2,000 new personnel to augment its human resource strength.

 

  1. Construction of the Bono Regional Headquarters which was started over two decades ago was finally completed. The Fire Service’s forensic laboratory at the Headquarters, is 80 percent completed and is expected to be fully completed and operationalised in 2022.

 

  1. In 2022, the Service will continue with its Home Fire Safety Campaign termed “Dumgya Project”. The campaign is to sensitise home owners and other individuals on the need to obtain a fire certificate at a fee to ensure that homes meet a certain minimum safety requirement for habitation.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the National Peace Council (NPC) brought together more than 80 leaders from political parties, including key power brokers and actors at the national and constituency levels to dialogue towards achieving post-election peace. It also held dialogues on countering post-election violence in five most affected constituencies to reach consensus for greater political tolerance.

 

  1. In 2022, the Council will undertake monitoring visits to conflict areas and other areas of potential conflict. It will continue with conflict reduction interventions. The Council will collaborate with key stakeholders at the border communities to prevent violent extremism and promote peaceful and sustainable co-existence in Northern Ghana. It will also continue with its advocacy campaign on the eradication of vigilantism in selected regions and districts.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ministry, through the National Disaster Management Organisation (NADMO), carried out 4,872 public education exercises to sensitise the populace on major hazards, undertook 2,464 field trips for assessment, conducted 13 simulation exercises on flooding, and engaged 1,244 communities on disaster risk reduction. The Organisation also desilted 166 major drains to reduce flooding.

 

  1. In 2022, NADMO will intensify education on natural and man-made hazards. It will also coordinate with all earthquake risk reduction actors to prioritise and implement earthquake risk action plans. This will strengthen early warning and response mechanisms for disasters.

 

Crime Management Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ghana Prisons Service trained 70 juveniles and 1,250 adults in vocational skills at NVTI, prepared 584 inmates for BECE and 250 for WASSCE and enrolled 81 inmates for tertiary programmes. In addition, the Service established a Canine Unit at Nsawam to train security dogs to enhance its operations.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Church of Pentecost completed and handed over the Ejura Prison Camp in May 2021. In addition, the Damongo, Nsawam and Pomposo Prison Camps are at various stages of completion and will be handed over by the Church to the Service upon completion. This support will reduce overcrowding in prisons and improve the health of inmates.

 

  1. In 2021, the Service completed one 8-unit one-bedroom staff accommodation at the Roman Ridge Barracks and one 8-unit two-bedroom flats at Ankaful is ongoing. In 2022, the Service, will continue the construction of the Nsawam 800 Capacity Remand Project and resume work on Phase II of the Ankaful Maximum Security Prison. The Service will also continue to provide healthcare for inmates and staff and intensify inmates’ skills development programmes.

 

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ghana Police Service deepened intelligence-led policing through gathering of critical intelligence for effective and efficient combat of criminals in a proactive manner by preventing many potential crimes. A total of 2,012 newly recruited officers comprising 1,323 males and 689 females successfully passed out and were posted to various stations.

 

  1. The Ghana Police Service (GPS), in conjunction with other security agencies, launched “Operation Peace Trail” to secure the Eastern and Western Borders. The GPS Marine Unit, in collaboration with the Navy and other security agencies, are currently deployed on our territorial waters. Beach motor bike patrol teams have also been deployed. In addition, the Counter-Terrorism Unit of the Service has been deployed in: Bunkprugu, Chereponi, Gambaga and Yendi in the Northern Region; Kulungugu, Paga, Pusiga and Zebilla in the Upper East Region; and Gwollu, Hamile, Lawra, Nadowli, Tumu and Wechiau-Dorimon in the Upper West Region.

 

  1. In 2022, the Service will computerise and network all Police stations and offices to facilitate the implementation of the statistics tracking system and create specialised courts for expeditious disposal of cyber-crimes in the country. It will also create more Neighbourhood Watch Committees across the country in order to enhance partnership and collaboration with the communities to fight crime.

 

  1. The Service will extend the establishment of the Formed Police Units (FPU) in phases to all the 18 Police Regions in the country to ensure effective and efficient public order and crowd control system. The Police Service will increase its patrol duties in the communities and highways to curb the rising spate of armed robbery and other crimes in the country.

 

  1. The Police Service, in its quest to reduce carnage on our roads, will retrain and retool the MTTD on road traffic enforcement strategies and the use of modern scientific road traffic equipment.

 

  1. The Ghana Police Service will adopt a scientific intelligence-led strategy in prevention, detection and investigation of criminal cases. Specialised Criminal Investigation Units such as Forensic, Homicide, Cyber-crime, Finger prints and the Police Intelligence Directorate will be equipped with modern scientific equipment in line with international best practice.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Narcotics Control Commission opened offices in the Ahafo, Bono East, Oti, Savannah, Upper East and Volta Regions. The Commission undertook drug sensitisation programmes in 258 institutions covering 47,373 people on the harmful effects of drug trafficking and abuse. The Commission visited 18 rehabilitation centres and provided counselling to 389 persons. A total of

 

88,043.91 grams of various drugs were seized, while 121,074.31 grams of various narcotic drugs were destroyed by the order of the Courts.

 

  1. In 2022, the Commission will facilitate the passage of the requisite Legislative Instruments (L.I.) to operationalise Act 1019. It will intensify public sensitisation on the drug menace and also collaborate with treatment and rehabilitation centres to provide counselling and treatment interventions for persons suffering from substance use disorders.

 

Migration and Refugee Management Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ghana Immigration Service, through collaborative operations such as Operation Conquered Fist, Calm Life and Motherland, arrested 17,453 persons of various nationalities and repatriated 915 to their respective countries for flouting immigration laws.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, to resolve accommodation challenges of officers, the Service completed a 26-unit 4-Storey block of 1-Bedroom Flats at Dadieso, purchased six blocks of 2 and 3 bedroom flats consisting of 84 housing units at South Odorkor, and purchased 8No. 2-bedroom and 1No. 3-bedroom houses at Sunyani.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Service will ensure the application and enforcement of laws relating to immigration by investigating and prosecuting breaches of Immigration laws and regulations. It will also patrol the country’s borders to ensure border security and integrity. The Service will augment its workforce by recruiting 2,000 personnel.

 

  1. To provide secured working environment and ensure territorial integrity, Government commenced the construction of 15 Border Posts and Check Points and one residential accommodation. In addition, renovation works are ongoing on three offices and six residential accommodation blocks. Works on these projects are expected to be continued in 2022.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ghana Refugee Board completed 18 construction projects across refugee camps and host communities. The Board is putting measures in place to evacuate and relocate all recognised refugees at the Budumburam Camp to the Krisan Refugee Camp. The Board received 1,943 Liberian passports from Liberia and processed 1,501 to Ghana Immigration Service for residence and work permit out of which 1,166 were issued with the permit.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ghana Refugee Board will accelerate the process of reviewing the Ghana Refugee Law. It will intensify sensitisation for Ivorian refugees on the Cessation Clause to be applied in June 2022. The Board will continue with measures to evacuate and relocate all recognised refugees at the Budumburam

 

Camp to the Krisan Refugee Camp. The Board will also finalise an MoU with the National Identification Authority on the issuance of Ghana Card to refugees.

 

Gaming Regulation Programme
  1. Mr. Speaker, the Gaming Commission completed the procurement process to select a service provider for the Gaming Administration and Electronic Monitoring System to enhance work processes, monitoring and revenue generation. The Commission, in collaboration with the Ghana Revenue Authority (GRA), organised a stakeholders’ sensitisation meeting on the implementation of the Value Added Tax (VAT) for the gaming industry. The Commission, in collaboration with the Financial Intelligence Centre (FIC), also sensitised staff and gaming operators on Anti-Money Laundering (AML) Regulations and Suspicious Transaction Reporting (STR).

 

  1. The Commission closed down a number of unlicensed casinos at Asankragua (7), Enchi (3), Kumasi (5), Obuasi (2), Takoradi (1) and Wassa Akropong (4). Seven out of these unlicensed casinos regularised their operations and were issued with gaming licenses.

 

  1. In 2022, the Gaming Commission will construct an office complex for the head office. It will continue the process of amending the Gaming Act 2006, (Act 721) and develop L.I to strengthen the mandate of the Commission. It will also install and manage the Gaming Administration and Monitoring System. The Commission will further introduce the testing and certification of gaming equipment and establish a framework for the certification of employees in the gaming industry. The Commission will also facilitate sensitisation programmes for stakeholders on AML Regulations and STR.

 

MINISTRY OF NATIONAL SECURITY

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022
  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ministry of National Security formulated policies for the efficient management of security issues across the sector. Regular reports from the Intelligence Agencies were submitted to various arms of Government for the purpose of preserving peace and security in the country.

 

  1. The Ministry provided a secure and reliable communications platform nationwide among all Government Security Agencies. In addition, the Ministry managed emergency call centre operations and provided technical and strategic support to the Police Service to ensure prompt response to critical situations.

 

  1. The Accra Initiative Secretariat was established during the year. The Initiative is an effort of five ECOWAS member states (Ghana, Togo, Benin, Cote D’Ivoire and

 

Burkina Faso) at sharing intelligence to combat and counter terrorism and associated criminal activities.

 

  1. In 2022, the Ministry will continue with the retooling of the Intelligence Agencies with modern tools and software for improved communications and enhanced intelligence collection and analysis. In addition, the Ministry will pursue a policy of expansion of surveillance capabilities through the installation of more CCTV camera systems nationwide.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the Ministry will continue to implement its special operation activities such as Operation Calm Life, Cowleg, Vanguard and Conquest Fist in areas such as Alavanyo-Nkonya, Banda, Bawku, Bui Dam and Dagbon.

 

OFFICE OF THE SPECIAL PROSECUTOR

 

2021 Performance and Outlook for 2022
  1. Mr. Speaker, with the assumption of office of the new Special Prosecutor, the Office of the Special Prosecutor (OSP) moved into its new office and work is currently ongoing to equip the office to allow for recruitment of staff.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, the two court cases started by the Office were withdrawn for lack of evidence. The Office is in the process of recruiting staff for full operation to realise the vision of H.E. The President to fight against corruption and corruption- related offences.

 

  1. In 2022, the OSP will focus on: the completion of the retrofitting of the new office; recruitment of 251 staff; training and resourcing of staff; investigation and prosecution of cases; asset recovery and management; and prevention of corruption through public education and stakeholder engagements.

 

SECTION SEVEN: CONCLUSION

  1. Mr. Speaker, this Budget is crucial for our sustained recovery and transformation to a Ghana Beyond Aid. It requires a careful realignment and rebalancing of our needs, wants, and aspirations as a Nation and as a people. This will also require burden-sharing and the promotion and development of an entrepreneurial culture. We have extensively engaged and built partnerships of trust for the implementation of the policies presented in this Budget.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, this Budget has outlined the plans of the President and his Government to continue tackling the devastating impact of the pandemic on our economy and the fiscal impact on our debt sustainability efforts. We have committed to:
  • bold revenue policies and expenditure measures to achieve a new and more sustainable macro-fiscal balance;
  • empower the Private Sector to expand and create jobs;
  • innovative and comprehensive initiatives to improve access to finance, skills development, and promotion of entrepreneurship among our youth;
  • continued implementation of our flagship programmes to improve the living standards of our people;
  • strategic investments through the GhanaCARES “Obaatan Pa” programme to revitalise and transform the structure of our economy; and
  • initiatives to advance digitalisation and leverage it to boost efficiency in our

 

  1. Having steered our nation through the most difficult and uncertain period in our country’s history and with Ghanaians renewing their mandate for him, I can assure you that the commitment of His Excellency Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo- Addo to improve the living standards of fellow Ghanaians, and to create the self- confident country that is in charge of its destiny remains his number one priority.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, we promised to reduce the suffering of Ghanaians when we came into office and we did just that when we came into office. Specifically, the Government of Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo:
  • Reduced electricity tariffs cumulatively by 9 percent compared to a cumulative increase of 264 percent under the NDC;
  • Provided free water for households for April, May and June of 2020;
  • Doubled the Capitation Grant (From GH¢4.5 to GH¢10);
  • Established the Nation Builders Corps (NABCo) of 100,000 graduates to build the job skills of our graduates to be absorbed into the workforce;
  • Created jobs and stopped the freeze on recruitment in the public sector; Over 295,000 people recruited;
  • Abolished fees for post graduate medical training in Ghana;
  • Increased the share of the DACF to persons with disabilities by 50 percent;
  • Exempted Kayayei from market tolls;

 

  • Ensured the implementation of our pledge of employing 50% of the persons who manage the country’s toll booths from amongst Persons with Disabilities;
  • Expanded the LEAP to accommodate 150,000 more beneficiaries;
  • Expanded School Feeding from 6 million children to 2.1 million children, and also increased the amount spent on each child by 25 percent;
  • Restored Teacher Training Allowances;
  • Restored Nursing Training Allowances;
  • Abolished the three months’ pay policy for teachers;
  • Absorbed the cost of BECE and WASSCE exam registrations;
  • Abolished or reduced 15 taxes including excise duty on petroleum, VAT on financial services, real estate, and domestic airline tickets;
  • Made it easier to apply for a passport;
  • Made it easier to apply for a driver’s license;
  • Made it easier and quicker to apply for and obtain pension benefits within ten days;
  • Made it easier to buy electricity from your mobile phone;
  • Made it easier to apply for scholarships;
  • Made it easier to send and receive money through mobile money interoperability;
  • Made it easier to open a traditional bank account using your Ghanacard;
  • Ensured that no guarantor is required to obtain student The Ghanacard is more than sufficient;
  • Reduced corruption associated with obtaining public services by digitisation of service delivery;
  • Saved the NHIS from collapse by reducing arrears to service providers;
  • Provided GH¢600 million COVID fund for small businesses;
  • Made it easier for the renewal of NHIS membership through mobile phones;
  • Made it easier to register a business;
  • Made it easier to clear goods from the port through the paperless process;
  • Made it easier to apply for a construction permit;
  • Reduced inflation;
  • Reduced bank lending rates;
  • Reduced the depreciation of the cedi;
  • Increased the daily allowance of security personnel at UN Peacekeeping missions from US$31 to US$35;
  • Spent GH¢21 billion to save the deposits of 6 million depositors;
  • Implemented free TVET; and
  • Implemented the Free Senior High School

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, while we admit that we have not completely eliminated suffering, due in part to the hold back from the COVID-19 pandemic, we have, nonetheless, done more in terms of social interventions than any other Government since 7th January, 1993, and certainly more in this regard than any of the NDC Governments. We will, therefore, continue to work towards mitigating the burdens imposed by the global impact of COVID-19 on Ghanaians.

 

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, with his renewed mandate, His Excellency the President is resolute that in the next three years, he will establish a stronger and more stable economy, an entrepreneurial state that empowers young people to be bold, innovative, proactive and dynamic to contribute to the transformation of our country.

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, in addition to continuing the implementation of our flagship programmes, we will scale up interventions under the GH¢100 billion GhanaCARES “Obaatan Pa” programme and YouStart initiative.

 

  1. In 2022, through this Budget:
  • We will activate the YouStart initiative nationwide to promote skills and entrepreneurship among our Youth;
  • We will continue to support the private sector to expand and provide employment opportunities for our people;
  • We will prioritise the completion of on-going projects in the health, education, and housing sectors to drive social mobility and transformation;
  • We will continue to ramp-up our revenue mobilisation efforts to enable us secure quality living standards;
  • We will continue to subject all public expenditure to thorough justification in line with the PFM Act to ensure value for money for every cedi spent;
  • We will aggressively continue with road construction to connect communities, markets, and people;
  • We will continue to advance digitalisation to improve convenience for Ghanaians and create a modern digitised economy;
  • We will continue to promote Science, Technology, and Innovation to build our competencies for a resilient future;
  • We will continue to reposition our economy through our regional hubs programme to optimise the opportunities in the sub-region and on the continent;
  • We will continue to resource our security agencies to defend and protect Ghana and Ghanaians; and
  • We will continue to reform the energy sector, promote climate resilience, and drive the adoption of renewable energy

 

  1. Mr. Speaker, we want to thank this august House for the continuous support we have been receiving over the years. We will count on you for approval and support to implement the Budget for the transformation of our country.

 

  1. We are also appreciative of our numerous stakeholders for providing useful insights and perspectives in shaping this Budget.

 

  1. Right Honourable Speaker, I beg to move.

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George Awiadem Maclean

I'm Nobody but Everybody thinks I'm Somebody. I'm the only One they love to hate, and yet hate to love! Even at age 65, I still keep on learning a,b,c,d & 1,2,3,4!

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